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The strategy of humanitarian assistance.

Author: 
Kunugi T
Source: 
UN Chronicle. 1987 May; 24:[4] p..
Abstract: 

Recent studies on emergency and disaster relief have pointed to the need to further strengthen and improve the emergency-related capacities of the United Nations system and for arrangements for more effective use of those capacities. Nearly 40 per cent of the total United Nations resources during 1984 and 1985 were allocated to humanitarian activities, surpassing the percentage resources--some 34 per cent--for operational activities and other programmes in the economic and social sectors. Furthermore, in the past few years there has been a marked increase in resource allocation for humanitarian assistance around the world. In his book, The Quality of Mercy, William Shawcross says: "Humanitarian aid is often required because of abject political failure. It is neither intended, nor is it able, to resolve political crises that Governments have created or at least failed to address.' Referring to the Kampuchean operation, he states that one effect of such aid has been "to reinforce the political stalemate". Thus humanitarian aid does have political implications, with both pitfalls and constructive potential for facilitating a solution to an impasse. Because of ever-increasing humanitarian problems and such political implications, there is definite need for a new policy science of humanitarian assistance in the world today. (excerpt)

Language: 
Year: 
Document Number: 
296555
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