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International migration and development in Sub-Saharan Africa. Volume I.

Author: 
Russell SS; Jacobsen K; Stanley WD
Source: 
Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1990. [11], 168 p. (World Bank Discussion Paper 101; World Bank Discussion Papers. Africa Technical Department Series)
Abstract: 

International migration affects almost every aspect of development in which the World Bank works. Accordingly, this paper investigating international migration in sub-Saharan Africa as it relates to development was designed and produced to provide World Bank staff with a greater understanding of country-specific settings for which World Bank projects are designed. Analysis of previously collected and published data from a host of sources was used to aid staff in policy analysis, sector work, loan preparation, and evaluation of the consequences of structural adjustment. 35 million of a total 80 million worldwide international migrants are estimated to be in sub-Saharan Africa. This figure represents approximately 8% of the region's 1983 population of 443 million. International migration, whether gradual or sudden and unexpected, surely affects countries' development. Changes in remittances impact demand for education and health services, structural adjustment, and labor markets to mention just a few potential interactions. This study was designed to consider international migration for employment, but internal migration and refugee flows are also examined. Using data on migrant stock, the study looks at migration scale, trends, and characteristics as they relate to development issues in selected sectors. Migration trend interaction is considered with remittances, labor markets, highly skilled manpower, education, health, and agriculture. Country policy toward international migration in the region are considered. The authors envisage no significant reduction in regional international migration in the future.

Language: 
Year: 
Region / Country: 
Document Number: 
064809
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