Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Crushed homes, crushed lives.

Author: 
Scholz B
Source: 
Habitat Debate. 2002 Dec; 8(4):[3] p..
Abstract: 

For most women, the home is the single most important place in the world. Beyond shelter, it is a place of employment, where income is generated; it is a place to care for children; and it provides respite from violence in the streets. For some women, the home may be the only place where they can participate in social activities. The interconnectedness and particular relationship women have with housing suggests that a practice like forced eviction will have an acute and disparate impact on women’s lives. According the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, forced eviction is the involuntary, permanent or temporary removal of a person from his/her home or land, directly or indirectly attributable to the State, without the provision of, or access to, legal and other forms of protection The United Nations Commission on Human Rights has deemed the practice of forced evictions to be a “gross violation of human rights, in particular the right to housing.” General Comment No. 7 to the Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights, the most definitive statement on forced evictions in international law, adopted by the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, has named the practice of forced eviction a prima facie violation of the provision of the Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and “can only be carried out under exceptional circumstances” and then in stringent accordance with principles of international law. (excerpt)

Language: 
Year: 
Region / Country: 
Document Number: 
292263
Add to my documents. Add to My Documents