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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    119960

    Power and community: organizational and cultural responses to AIDS.

    Altman D

    London, England, Taylor and Francis, 1994. viii, 179 p. (Social Aspects of AIDS)

    Community involvement in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic has been central to helping to create the social, political, and cultural response to HIV/AIDS. At this point, no government or international agency HIV/AIDS program can be effective if it does not cooperate with and support grassroots responses. Moreover, the AIDS epidemic has been a powerful impetus to grassroots organizations of groups that have been marginalized as a result of gender, sexual orientation, race, or poverty. On the other hand, the emerging global AIDS industry has the potential to subvert traditional power structures and become isolated from those it claims to serve. Community groups can be co-opted into carrying out the agenda of this "industry" or they can continue to be subversive of the dominant social order. The central challenge facing the community movement is how to strengthen its political effectiveness without compromising its basis in grassroots participation and control. Of concern are emerging tensions within community-based organizations between activism and service provision, altruism and self-help, volunteer participation and management control, and fluidity of function and increasing bureaucratization. Another concern is the potential for effective community and nongovernmental organization-sponsored programs to take the pressure off of governments to provide or reform essential health services. Direct community sector involvement in the policy making process represents the best strategy for ensuring that national AIDS policies are responsive to those most affected by the epidemic.
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  2. 2
    070938

    Increasing contribution of voluntary organisations in attaining population stabilisation.

    Talwar PP

    DEMOGRAPHY INDIA. 1990 Jan-Jun; 19(1):17-26.

    India is the 1st country to have embraced the notion of family planning at the national level. Provisions for programs were indeed included as components of the nation's 1st 5-year plan in 1951. India's population grew over the 1900s to reach a peak growth rate of 2.2%/year over the period 1961-81, then declined slowly to 2.04%/year in 1988. Zero population growth is, however, ultimately desired by the country's planners and policy makers. A midterm goal has been set to attain net reproduction rate of 1 by the year 2000. Declines in crude birth, crude death, and infant mortality rates will be required to reach this objective, in addition to an increase in the couple protection rate. National family planning efforts have met with only moderate success thus far, in large part due to the public perception of the program as a product of and for the Indian government. Voluntary organizations do, however, have great potential to contribute to the program's success. Their potential role is discussed. Specifically, non-governmental organizations (NGO) may help to make the program more community-oriented and accessible, with improved internal worker coordination. They may train functionaries, help supply spacing methods, provide follow-up acceptors, and help make family welfare education be more effective in the organized sector. The paper discusses the degree of current NGO involvement, collaborative experiences with government and how they may be increased in both quantity and effectiveness, and the need for full attention to NGOs for their effective involvement.
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  3. 3
    068455

    AIDS in India: constructive chaos?

    Chatterjee A

    HEALTH FOR THE MILLIONS. 1991 Aug; 17(4):20-3.

    Until recently, the only sustained AIDS activity in India has been alarmist media attention complemented by occasional messages calling for comfort and dignity. Public perception of the AIDS epidemic in India has been effectively shaped by mass media. Press reports have, however, bolstered awareness of the problem among literate elements of urban populations. In the absence of sustained guidance in the campaign against AIDS, responsibility has fallen to voluntary health activists who have become catalysts for community awareness and participation. This voluntary initiative, in effect, seems to be the only immediate avenue for constructive public action, and signals the gradual development of an AIDS network in India. Proceedings from a seminar in Ahmedabad are discussed, and include plans for an information and education program targeting sex workers, health and communication programs for 150 commercial blood donors and their agents, surveillance and awareness programs for safer blood and blood products, and dialogue with the business community and trade unions. Despite the lack of coordination among volunteers and activists, every major city in India now has an AIDS group. A controversial bill on AIDS has ben circulating through government ministries and committees since mid-1989, a national AIDS committee exists with the Secretary of Health as its director, and a 3-year medium-term national plan exists for the reduction of AIDS and HIV infection and morbidity. UNICEF programs target mothers and children for AIDS awareness, and blood testing facilities are expected to be expanded. The article considers the present chaos effectively productive in forcing the Indian population to face up to previously taboo issued of sexuality, sex education, and sexually transmitted disease.
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  4. 4
    271112
    Peer Reviewed

    Anti-sterilization abuse organizing: a retrospective examination.

    McDonald M

    INTERNATIONAL QUARTERLY OF COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION. 1988-89; 9(2):111-24.

    This retrospective examination looks at the strengths and weaknesses of anti-sterilization abuse organizing in the US, and draws out lessons for other areas of work. It begins by exploring the problem of sterilization abuse and the history of the movement against it. Theoretical concepts of community organizing, such as, the concept of community and the concept of movement, are defined and discussed. Issue selection and strategy, 2 crucial aspects of any successful organizing effort, are examined as are organizational forms and coalition building. An evaluation indicates that the anti-abuse efforts were successful and rich with lessons for reproductive rights and other popular health struggles today. (Author's modified)
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  5. 5
    032480

    America's challenge.

    Lindsay GN

    Victor-Bostrom Fund Report. 1968 Fall; (10):24-6.

    As government increasingly recognizes its own obligations to support and provide family planning as a health and social measure, serious questions are raised as to the proper role for Planned Parenthood World Federation as a private organization. Federal programs both at home and abroad tend to make private fundraising more difficult, whatever the role of this organization may be. Contrary to common impression, experience thus far indicates that the existence of governmental programs does not decrease demands on Planned Parenthood as a private agency. A wide gap also exists between public acceptance, which has been realized, and public conviction, which still has not been accepted. Only those who feel distress at the vision of an all-encompassing megalopolis, only those with concern for the qualify of life in the crowd, and only those who see finite limits of resources recognize that the US must someday plan a halt to population growth. As the gap between the developed and the underdeveloped world widens, economists point out that the US, with less than 6% of the world's population, already consumes some 50% of the world's available raw materials. Business and government leaders are beginning to understand the rate at which an industrial and affluent society consumes the world's substance and threatens the environment. If the assumption is correct that the population explosion constitutes a major threat to life on earth, then America's own attitudes and actions at home, as well as abroad and in the developing countries, are vital. In the next few years Planned Parenthood faces the task of converting the tide of public acceptance into one of conviction and effective action on a giant scale both at home and abroad. In its effort, Planned Parenthood has continued to expand its own service functions. It now has 157 local affiliates with an additional 30 in the organizational stage. In 1967 Planned Parenthood affiliates operated 470 family planning centers, 71 more than in the previous year. Beginning in 1964 an attempt was made to quantify the needs and the costs of bringing birth control services to all who need it in the US. The partnership with government has been more intimate than simple parallelism of effort. Planned Parenthood initiated or helped to administer nearly half of the family planning projects sponsored by the War on Poverty. It has served as a consultant on family planning programs to the Department of Health, Education and Welfare and assisted affiliates and other community agencies in developing project applications for federal funds totalling about $4 million, of which about $2 million for 25 projects has been funded. Planned Parenthood World Population has undertaken the planning function and has for that purpose established a national technical assistance center and program.
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  6. 6
    037700

    Expanding the CSDR in the industrialized world.

    Konig U

    Assignment Children. 1984; (65/68):37-42.

    The potential for the Child Survival and Development Revolution (CSDR) can only be realized, and a significant reduction in the infant mortality achieved, if all forces are mobilized worldwide. In industrialized countries, it is essential that the general public become aware of the recent breakthroughs in social development, and that the potential only now exists to reduce infant mortality and to improve child development on the basis of a combination of new knowledge and communication capacities that now exist in developing countries. National Committees for UNICEF, meeting in Rome in October 1984, developed lines of action for disseminating the CDSR message to the public in their respective countries and in mobilizing public opinion, NGOs and governments. A 3-point action plan was drawn up, to include awareness-raising through the diffusion of the CSDR message to target groups (media, opinion leaders); through an assessment in each of their countries of immunization levels, breastfeeding, and growth monitoring practices and advocacy with NGOs working on behalf of children in developing countries so that the measures recommended by UNICEF are included in their projects.
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  7. 7
    731938

    Relationships between governments and voluntary family planning associations.

    London, International Planned Parenthood Federation, March 1973. Family Planning Reviews. No. 1. 40 p

    The report discusses general trends in relationships between governments and voluntary family planning associations and the specifics relevant to particular nations. At the beginning of 1973, 109 nongovernmental family planning associations existed and 40 governments carried out official programs. In many nations governmental participation occurs even without an official policy. Some governments provide family planning arrangements within the regular public health network. In some cases the government assists private efforts with funding, facilities, or doctors' time. A combination of approaches is typical. As government takes on more responsibilities, private associations often relinquish their service roles and expand their educational and motivational activities. In the future, government involvement and interest in family planning should increase. Charts summarize the international situation in government/voluntary family planning association relationships.
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  8. 8
    710145

    The pill on trial.

    Kistner RW

    American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. April 15, 1971; 109(8):1118-1127.

    The 1970 Nelson Committee hearings were held to determine whether Pill users were properly told about the side effects and suspected complications. The author charges the Committee hearings of sensationalizing adverse results of the Pill, causing 18% of all U.S. users to stop this treatment and another 23% to seriously consider quitting. A survey following the Nelson hearings showed 97% of the 13,000 U.S. obstetricians and gynecologists questioned believed oral contraceptives to be medically acceptable. The Scowen report of England (1970) said the Pill is the best contraceptive available, and the low-estrogen pill (50 mcg) is the safest. Because of the relationship of the pill to thromboembolism brought out by Nelson hearings oral contraceptives now must carry a health warning, and the result of the Scowen Committee will most likely encourage doctors to prescribe low dosage estrogen pills.
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