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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    327779
    Peer Reviewed

    Contraptions for intrauterine contraception.

    Edouard L

    Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care. 2008 Jul; 34(3):199-201.

    Intrauterine contraception is underutilised largely due to its reputed association with infections. The Copper T-380A, one of the most cost-effective methods of contraception and the most widely used intrauterine contraceptive device in the world, is effective for at least 12 years and is also used for emergency contraception. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG IUS) is extremely useful for treating menorrhagia. A renaissance of intrauterine contraception is overdue and will necessitate community-wide information campaigns to stimulate demand generation, implementation of service guidelines that avoid restrictive eligibility criteria, and access to service providers with special training in counselling and clinical skills. (author's)
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  2. 2
    137829

    Introducing more contraceptive methods in Jordan.

    Gallagher M

    AVSC NEWS. 1998 Spring; 36(1):3, 8.

    With the average woman in Jordan bearing 4-5 children during her reproductive lifetime, Jordan's population is growing rapidly. Many contraceptive methods are available through Jordan's well-developed health care system, but the public is aware of only a few, and misinformation is common. The government of Jordan launched a study, sponsored by AVSC and Family Health International (FHI), to determine the feasibility of introducing Norplant implants and Depo-Provera, in an effort to increase the choice, knowledge, availability, and use of contraceptive methods. More than 300 clients who received Norplant implant or Depo-Provera services at three health care facilities in Amman were followed. Many of the women chose either of these two methods because of their desire to delay pregnancy for a long time, often 5 years or more. Most cited length of protection, ease of use, dissatisfaction with previously used methods, and fewer perceived side effects than other methods as reasons for choosing either Norplant or Depo-Provera. The quality of counseling varied among the three facilities. At the end of 6 months follow-up, about 80% of the Norplant users and one-third of the Depo-Provera users reported being very satisfied with the method and planned to continue using it. However, although most clients experienced at least one side effect during the first 6 months of use, such effects were cited as the main reason for method discontinuation. Discontinuation of Depo-Provera was also influenced by popular attitudes and outside decision-makers such as health care providers, counselors, husbands, and other family members. Study results were presented at a workshop held in Amman in fall 1997.
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  3. 3
    113579

    Norplant system insertion and removal rates in relation to negative media coverage among a low income, inner-city population.

    O'Hare D; Benedicto MA; Baker M; Nicholas N

    [Unpublished] 1995. Presented at the 123rd Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association [APHA], San Diego, California, October 29 - November 2, 1995. 4, [2] p.

    The Maternity, Infant Care - Family Planning Projects (MIC-FPP), a service division of the Medical and Health Research Association of New York City, Inc., provides comprehensive family planning care to approximately 17,000 low-income postpartum and family planning patients annually in 10 inner-city clinics. In October 1993, the Norplant contraceptive system was added to the MIC-FPP formulary of available contraceptives in their clinics. Prior to that date, many women had requested Norplant, explaining that they had heard about it from satisfied friends both in the US and their countries of origin. 117 women requested and received Norplant between October 1, 1993, and July 31, 1994. Only 45 women, however, requested and received Norplant during the subsequent ten-month period of August 1, 1994, to May 31, 1995. Moreover, during August 1, 1994, to May 31, 1995, 52 of these 162 women requested removal of the system. Negative media coverage in the popular press is most likely responsible for the decline in use of Norplant over the period. Indeed, it seems that the popularity, acceptance, and rejection of a contraceptive method is often more strongly influenced by mass media than by other factors such as age, country of origin, prior pregnancies, pregnancy terminations, or number of children.
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