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Your search found 58 Results

  1. 1
    300337

    Writing xenophobia: immigration and the print media in post-apartheid South Africa.

    Danso R; McDonald DA

    Africa Today. 2001; 48(3):115-137.

    This paper discusses the print media’s coverage of crossborder migration in South Africa and how it may affect both public opinion and policymaking on the topic. The paper argues that coverage of international migration by the South African press has been largely anti-immigrant and unanalytical. Not all reportage is negative, and newspaper coverage would appear to be improving over time, but the overwhelming majority of the comprehensive collection of newspaper articles, editorials and letters to the editor surveyed for this research are negative about immigrants and immigration and are extremely unanalytical in nature, uncritically reproducing problematic statistics and assumptions about crossborder migration in the region. Although it is impossible to draw direct causal links between this kind of anti-immigrant media coverage and anti-immigrant policymaking and xenophobia in South Africa, the paper does argue that the two are at least mutually reinforcing and that the print media has a responsibility to be more balanced and factual in its reporting on the issue. (author's)
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  2. 2
    150872

    [Replacement migration will accentuate development disparities: the viewpoint of an African demographer] Les migrations de remplacement accentueront les ecarts de developpement: le point de vue d'un demographe africain.

    N'Guessan K

    EQUILIBRES ET POPULATIONS. 2000 Jun-Jul; (59):12.

    Recent studies in Africa conducted by the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) confirm the existence of a fertility decline began toward the end of the 1980s. In order to sustain this trend, most African governments adopted population policies supported by the financial and technical assistance of international or bilateral organizations. The need to lower fertility levels on the continent was at the same time accompanied by the definition of programs to reduce mortality levels. Developed regions are an important emigration destination, especially among the peoples of southern Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. However, there is relatively little emigration from sub-Saharan Africa toward the North, a population flow that the developed countries nonetheless attempt to either reduce or block altogether. Saturated job markets and the corresponding rising unemployment in these latter countries have provoked the rise of vociferous arguments against the arrival of immigrants and the rejection of foreign populations. Replacement migration policies could lead to a number of adverse consequences if adopted by the developed countries as a solution to population aging. The author considers this problem by asking himself why northern destination countries are not adopting pronatalist policies.
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  3. 3
    257472

    A comparative assessment of public opinion toward immigrants and immigration policies.

    Simon RJ; Lynch JP

    INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION REVIEW. 1999 Summer; 33(2):455-67.

    This article is part of a larger study of public attitudes toward immigration in seven countries that historically and currently have had different policies and practices vis-a-vis immigration. The countries involved are Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Japan and the United States. The time frame for which most of the public opinion data will be reported is from 1970 through 1995. The data have been collected from national surveys that were conducted in each of the countries. (EXCERPT)
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  4. 4
    163878

    The securitization of cross-border migration: Sweden in the era of globalization.

    Hettne B; Abiri E

    In: Redefining security: population movements and national security, edited by Nana Poku and David T. Graham. Westport, Connecticut, Praeger, 1998. 187-201.

    This chapter analyzes the process by which cross-border migration in Sweden has developed into a security issue. The analysis is contextualized broadly within the current globalization process.... The chapter also raises the question of what kind of national security a democratic state like Sweden should strive for. When the linkage between migration and security is analyzed academically, a common hypothesis is that a securitization of migration discourse--that is, a change in the official migration discourse of a state--is more likely to precede the securitization of the migration policy--that is, changes in the migration policy of the entity.... This chapter argues that the development of the link between migration and security in Sweden has been the other way around--security as a policy making act preceded the speech act. (EXCERPT)
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  5. 5
    134659

    African-American attitudes towards United States immigration policy.

    Diamond J

    INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION REVIEW. 1998 Summer; 32(2):451-70.

    In the growing US debate over immigration policy since the 1980s, it is often argued that immigration must be restricted in order to protect Black Americans from competition with newly arrived immigrants. Findings are reported upon Black Americans' attitudes toward immigration policy. An extensive review of more than 50 Black newspapers and magazines, from January 1994 to June 1996, uncovered attitudes both in favor of and against restricting immigration. The majority of articles in the Black press on immigration, however, were nonrestrictionist. The Black political leadership is also against restricting immigration. Furthermore, a review of the 14 most recent national opinion polls on immigration available to the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research as of July 1996 found that while many Blacks favor restricting immigration, all US Blacks should not be characterized as restrictionist, especially when compared with Whites. Historical attitudes among US Blacks dating back to before the abolition of slavery are discussed.
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  6. 6
    255477

    The changing demography of U.S. immigration flows: patterns, projections, and contexts.

    Bean FD; Cushing RG; Haynes CW

    MIGRATION AND REFUGEES: POLITICS AND POLICIES IN THE UNITED STATES AND GERMANY. 1997; 121-52.

    The paper is divided into four sections. The first describes the major flows of people coming into the United States during the twentieth century, especially since the end of World War II.... The second examines the implications of these flows for the current and future racial/ethnic composition of the U.S. population.... The third assesses the demographic and economic contexts within which these flows have occurred. The fourth argues that a combined view of trends in migration flows, racial/ethnic composition, interracial and interethnic marriage patterns, and economic and labor market outcomes makes it possible to discern not only why recent immigration patterns have come to be negatively perceived but also why they may have come to be seen as violating the prevailing sense of social contract in the United States. (EXCERPT)
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  7. 7
    254478

    [The fight against clandestine immigration] Lutte contre l'immigration clandestine.

    Sayah J

    CAHIERS DE L'ORIENT. 1995; 38(2):151-68.

    The history of recent French legislation on immigration is discussed. The author examines the consequences of stricter immigration laws, suggesting that they force more people into illegality and thus increase public suspicion of and action against foreigners. (ANNOTATION)
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  8. 8
    253484

    [Toward a new immigration policy] Pour une nouvelle politique d'immigration.

    Weil P

    ESPRIT. 1996 Apr; (220):136-54.

    The author examines current immigration policies in France in light of the growing success of the right-wing political party, the National Front, which proposes to send back to their countries of origin the 3 million or so non-European immigrants currently residing in France. He suggests that the concern of the French people with immigration issues is real and not just a symptom of concern about other social and political issues. He also notes that recent attempts to control immigration, such as the Pasqua legislation of 1993, have been largely ineffective. He concludes that realistic policies need to accept the fact that, although immigration can possibly be controlled, it cannot be stopped entirely.
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  9. 9
    252616

    Two traditions of American reform: immigration regulation and the lessons of history.

    Tichenor DJ

    CURRENT WORLD LEADERS. 1995 Apr; 38(2):45-62.

    Immigration reform long has produced fierce conflict among U.S. policymakers over how to regulate racial and ethnic diversity, economic opportunity, and global involvement in American life. This essay attempts to provide an historical perspective on recent innovations in [U.S.] immigration policy, comparing them with restrictionist and expansionist traditions in U.S. political development. While recent reforms exemplify an unprecedented openness in keeping with a more inclusive democracy, their failure to address public anxieties about porous borders inadvertently breathed life into a new anti-immigrant politics that may threaten these policy achievements. (EXCERPT)
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  10. 10
    252596

    Sweden and its immigrants: policies versus opinions.

    Rosenberg G

    DAEDALUS. 1995 Summer; 124(3):209-18.

    `Refugees' has long been the only category of immigrants for which Sweden has had any policies. Traditional immigration, in which men and women enter a foreign country in search of jobs or other social or economic goods, has for all practical purposes ceased to exist in Sweden. The clash between policies and opinions--in this instance between political myth and social realities--has become a matter of great importance. (EXCERPT)
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  11. 11
    255022

    The powerful consequences of being too weak. The impact of immigration on democratic regimes.

    Zincone G

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY/ARCHIVES EUROPEENNES DE SOCIOLOGIE/EUROPAISCHES ARCHIV FUR SOZIOLOGIE. 1997; 38(1):104-38.

    The potential negative effects of large-scale immigration on the democratic functioning of modern European countries, whose political systems were generally not set up to take such migration into account, are explored. These effects could include a disruption of the traditional balance between business and labor, the weakening of social welfare, and increased burdens on educational systems. The extent to which it is possible for a democratic state to control immigration flows is considered. In the author's opinion, the fear that immigrant communities will bring a new wave of fundamentalism into Europe, disrupting the secular character of European institutions and threatening the homogeneity of the political culture, is not justified. She argues that bringing immigrants into the political process as soon as possible will minimize the likelihood of serious problems.
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  12. 12
    254682

    Immigration reform and the browning of America: tensions, conflicts and community instability in metropolitan Los Angeles.

    Johnson JH; Farrell WC; Guinn C

    INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION REVIEW. 1997 Winter; 31(4):1,055-95.

    Tensions, conflicts, and community instability associated with heightened immigration--especially of nonwhite immigrant groups--threaten to balkanize America. This article highlights the root causes of the growing opposition to both immigrants and U.S. immigration policy--the nativist backlash, presents a typology of the community-level conflicts that have arisen as a consequence of heightened immigration--legal and illegal--to the United States over the last 30 years, and outlines the conditions under which diversity can be brought to the forefront as one of society's strengths....The 1992 Los Angeles County Social Survey (LACSS)...provides insights into the nature and magnitude of intergroup stereotyping and prejudice in a community in which large numbers of immigrants have settled. (EXCERPT)
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  13. 13
    254630

    The cuckoo's egg: how the U.S. Department of Education is misleading America about immigration's impact on our nation's schools.

    Thom LH

    POPULATION AND ENVIRONMENT. 1997 Nov; 19(2):119-27.

    The author critically examines U.S. Department of Education data that attempt to account for the country's rising school enrollment. The focus in on the extent to which immigration has contributed to that increase. The author asserts that "the Federal Government is...slipping other people's children into our nests and telling us that we should take responsibility for them. It is gravely harming American children with overcrowded classrooms." (EXCERPT)
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  14. 14
    254555

    Australian identity, racism and recent responses to Asian immigration to Australia.

    Jones GW

    Canberra, Australia, Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences, Demography Program, 1997. [19] p. (Working Papers in Demography No. 71)

    In the context of the recent increase in non-white immigration to Australia, particularly from Asia, Australian attitudes toward immigration are examined in the light of Australia's search for a national identity. The author notes that there has always been an element of racism in Australian nationalism, and that public opinion is against Asian immigration, as well as against immigration in general, although immigration is not seen as an issue of major concern. The need for responsible political leadership to avoid an increase in anti-Asian attitudes, particularly among working-class Australians, is stressed.
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  15. 15
    254119

    A continent of migration: European mass migration in the twentieth century.

    Munz R

    NEW COMMUNITY. 1996 Apr; 22(2):201-26.

    This article gives an overview of the size and geography of migration to and within Europe. Changing causes, patterns and trends of international migration, as well as key periods, are discussed. It also analyses the composition of foreign resident populations in Europe. The article covers the second half of the twentieth century. Different types of mass migration as well as links between particular sending and receiving countries are analysed. The article also looks at public opinion concerning ethnocentric attitudes and the number of foreigners in Europe. Finally, policy options are discussed. (EXCERPT)
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  16. 16
    254109

    The impact of immigration on U.S. demographics.

    Fallon JE

    JOURNAL OF SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC STUDIES. 1996 Summer; 21(2):141-66.

    The author discusses the impact of immigration on the demographic profile of the United States, with a focus on changes in the sources of immigration and the effect of U.S. migration policy. "The demographic destruction of the U.S. has been swift and dramatic. The transformation, made in constant contravention of popular mandate, has been unprecedented in the history of democratic societies. To better understand this phenomenon and the role which post-1965 immigration policy plays in it,...15 tables have been created and compiled from the official statistics of the U.S. Bureau of the Census and the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service." (EXCERPT)
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  17. 17
    254153

    On the political economy of immigration.

    Benhabib J

    EUROPEAN ECONOMIC REVIEW. 1996 Dec; 40(9):1,737-43.

    The authors "study how immigration policies that impose capital and skill requirements would be determined under majority voting when native agents differ in their wealth holdings and vote to maximize their income". The results of the model calculations indicate that "the native population will be polarized between those who would like an immigration policy to maximize the domestic capital-labor ratio and those who would like an immigration policy that would minimize it". (EXCERPT)
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  18. 18
    130235

    Immigration and emigration: current trends, dilemmas and policies.

    Skeldon R

    In: The other Hong Kong report: 1994, edited by Donald H. McMillen and Man Si-wai. Hong Kong, Chinese University Press, 1994. 165-86.

    The author analyzes recent trends in emigration and immigration in Hong Kong. He considers return movements; the fear of a "tidal wave" of immigration from China and the impact on policy; Vietnamese migrants; and problems related to passports and residence. (ANNOTATION)
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  19. 19
    253724

    The polls--trends: immigrants and immigration.

    Lapinski JS; Peltola P; Shaw G; Yang A

    PUBLIC OPINION QUARTERLY. 1997 Summer; 61(2):356-83.

    This report summarizes attitudes and opinions in the United States concerning aspects of immigration based on searches of survey archives and both published and unpublished sources. It includes information on attitudes toward legal and illegal immigrants and toward immigrants from different countries, evaluation of immigrant characteristics, why Americans are reluctant to admit more immigrants, the perceived impact of immigrants on U.S. culture and language, and evaluation of immigration policies. Particular attention is given to attitudes and opinions on immigration in California.
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  20. 20
    253694

    Immigration and the social contract.

    Bean FD; Cushing RG; Haynes CW; Van Hook JV

    SOCIAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY. 1997 Jun; 78(2):249-68.

    The specific purposes of this paper are (1) to develop a portrait of the recent major migration flows to the United States, (2) to assess their implications for the racial/ethnic composition of the U.S. population, and (3) to examine the economic context in which they have occurred. Our general goal is to try to explain not only why recent migration flows have come to be negatively perceived, but also why they appear increasingly to be seen as violating the prevailing sense of social contract in the United States. The authors conclude that "devising immigration policies that are fair as well as sensitive to their environmental, developmental, trade, and foreign-policy implications may prove difficult unless the public sense of economic security increases enough to strengthen what appears to be an increasingly fragile sense of social contract." (EXCERPT)
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  21. 21
    161112

    [Expanding the lebensraum of Africans: how the "country of European uncles" also became the country of African nephews] L'elargissement de l'espace de vie des Africains: comment le "pays des oncles" europeens devient aussi celui des neveux africains.

    Lututala MB

    REVUE TIERS MONDE. 1997 Apr-Jun; 38(150):333-46.

    The author analyzes migration from Africa to the developed countries of the north, focusing on the underlying logic and methods of such migration. He suggests that Africans see migration to the northern countries as a survival strategy and as an attempt to integrate themselves into the world economic system. The methods employed by African migrants to circumvent the increasing efforts to limit their numbers are described, with a focus on their use of regulations designed to aid the reunification of families. The author suggests that rich countries may have a moral obligation to allow migration from Africa, since its causes lie in the history of colonialism and the present and past exploitation of the developing countries by those of the north.
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  22. 22
    253391

    [The probable future of European "East-West" international migration] Pravdepodobny vyvoj evropske mezinarodni migrace "Vychod-Zapad".

    Drbohlav D

    SBORNIK CESKE GEOGRAFICKE SPOLECNOSTI. 1995; 100(2):92-106.

    Probable future trends in East-West migration in Europe are examined using data from a two-stage survey of 109 European scholars and administrators. The opinions of those surveyed are summarized concerning the determinants of future migration, migration types and components, volumes and timings of migrations, and regional differences. Their recommendations for changes in migration policy in both sending and receiving countries are included. (ANNOTATION) (SUMMARY IN ENG)
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  23. 23
    253221

    A continent of migration: European mass migration in the twentieth century.

    Munz R

    NEW COMMUNITY. 1996 Apr; 22(2):201-26.

    This article gives an overview of the size and geography of migration to and within Europe. Changing causes, patterns and trends of international migration, as well as key periods, are discussed. It also analyses the composition of foreign resident populations in Europe. The article covers the second half of the twentieth century. Different types of mass migration as well as links between particular sending and receiving countries are analysed. The article also looks at public opinion concerning ethnocentric attitudes and the number of foreigners in Europe. Finally, policy options are discussed. (EXCERPT)
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  24. 24
    252615

    Don't send us your huddled masses]

    Somers P; Gordy S

    CURRENT WORLD LEADERS. 1995 Apr; 38(2):35-44.

    The notion of the United States as `the mother of exiles' is an illusion, a legend perpetuated during an era when cheap immigrant labor was necessary to fuel the development of the country. The truth is that immigrants have been shunned for much of our history, tolerated only because their semiskilled labor was needed. Immigrant bashing was common, especially during times of economic distress. This article details the history of U.S. immigration and squarely places the current nativist sentiments in perspective. (EXCERPT)
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  25. 25
    253121

    Immigration and the social contract.

    Bean FD; Cushing RG; Haynes CW; Van Hook JV

    Austin, Texas, University of Texas, Texas Population Research Center, 1996. 22, [5] p. (Texas Population Research Center Paper No. 96-97-08)

    Immigration issues have risen once again to a prominent place on the public policy agenda of the United States....To understand why policy makers and the public have grown increasingly concerned about immigration, it is helpful to examine recent trends in the magnitude of flows of persons coming into the country compared to those at earlier time periods....Thus, the specific purposes of this paper are: (1) to develop a portrait of the recent major migration flows to the United States, (2) to assess their implications for the racial/ethnic composition of the U.S. population, and (3) to examine the economic context in which they have occurred. The general goal is to try to explain not only why recent migration flows have come to be negatively perceived, but also why they appear increasingly to be seen as violating the prevailing sense of social contract in the United States. (EXCERPT)
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