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  1. 1
    072997

    Ascertaining the user perspectives on community participation in family planning programme in Thailand.

    Soonthorndhada A; Buravisit O; Vong-Ek P

    [Bangkok], Thailand, Mahidol University, Institute for Population and Social Research, 1991 Dec. [8], 132 p. (IPSR Publication No. 156)

    A study of community members, family planning program staff and managers, community-based distributors (CBDs), and local leaders in 4 regions of Thailand was undertaken to determine the extent to which community members are willing to participate in family planning programs, and which activities they prefer. 400 married women aged 15-44, 100 of their spouses, with a contraceptive prevalence rate of 69% taken equally from 12 villages, 16 CBDs from 12 communities, 69 village leaders divided into 1 focus group per village, and 17 staff were interviewed from May to July 1989. 5 variables that determine attitudes were measured: sociocultural norms for participatory behavior, values and beliefs underlying norms, institutionalized participatory behavior, government policies, and the family planning program. Some of the responsibilities open for participatory activity were promotion of family planning in the community,k educating potential users, target-setting, selecting, paying, training and supervising CBDs, record keeping, storing commodities, identifying potential acceptors, and transportation to clinics. Staff and CBDs considered community participation a valuable strategy. Community members considered participation attractive if it were perceived as beneficial to the community. They liked the idea of having services locally, but showed some doubts about the competence of CBDs. They expressed hesitancy about participating in such a personal realm as family planning. Most thought that program staff would be better able to do IEC work. Community members would consider participating in transportation to clinics, selection of CBDs, identification of acceptors, and referral to clinics. Community members were strongly motivated to work in collective, social activities. Managers wanted to make community people more self-reliant and cooperative. No one wanted community participation to duplicate current programs, or to pass program expenses on to localities.
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  2. 2
    266246

    Population education through rural cooperatives; a pilot project in Comilla.

    Howie I; Chowdhury M

    [Unpublished] 1978. Paper presented at National Workshop on Innovative Projects in Family Planning and Rural Institutions in Bangladesh, Dacca, Bangladesh, Feb. 1-4, 1978. 9 p.

    The concept of integration of family planning with other development programs has led to the innovation of a multisectoral approach to population control and family planning in Bangladesh. Population education through rural cooperatives is 1 such pilot project currently under implementation. Primary cooperatives are 1 of the few widespread, tangible, and viable rural institutions operating within the village. This paper summarizes the activities undertaken so far to create an awareness of the population problem among rural cooperative and other village leaders and to enlish their support in spreading the message of family planning. The Project has passed through the following stages: 1) The establishment of a viable working infrastructure; 2) The preparation for field activities by raising and formalizing support from locally relevant authorities. The Project team initiated a series of regular contacts through personal visits and correspondence; 3) The development and execution of a 4-month training module for the leaders (based on weekly classes) to achieve acceptability and committment by the leaders; to ascertain attitudes, values, and beliefs in order to gauge what motivational stimuli villagers will respond to; to discover links between previous experiences of change in response to the felt needs of communities and that of contemporary problems; to test various educational practices, materials and motivational approaches; and to help the cooperative manager to motivate his fellow members and counter arguments against family planning likely to be thrown at him. A description of the training sessions is provided. Phase 4 will consist of follow-up and Phase 5 will entail evaluation. The paper concludes with a detailed list of preliminary findings.
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