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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    307079
    Peer Reviewed

    Delphi method and nominal group technique in family planning and reproductive health research.

    van Teijlingen E; Pitchforth E; Bishop C; Russell E

    Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care. 2006 Oct; 32(4):249-252.

    Both the Delphi method and nominal group technique offer structured, transparent and replicable ways of synthesising individual judgements and have been used extensively for priority setting and guideline development in health-related research including reproductive health. Within evidence-based practice they provide a means of collating expert opinion where little evidence exists. They are distinct from many other methods because they incorporate both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Both methods are inherently flexible; this article also discusses other strengths and weaknesses of these methods. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    272852

    [Opinion survey on family planning, urban population] Enquete d'opinion sur la planification familiale, milieu urban.

    Morocco. Ministere de la Sante Publique. Division des Statistiques

    Rabat, Ministere de la Sante Publique, Division des Statistiques, 1971. 132 p

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  3. 3
    127058

    Perceptions and realities: How safe is the pill? The role of the media, healthcare providers, and the pharmaceutical industry in shaping American women's perceptions about birth control. Q and A.

    Alan Guttmacher Institute [AGI]; Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation; National Press Foundation

    New York, New York, AGI, 1996 Jan 31. 4 p. (Emerging Issues in Reproductive Health: A Briefing Series for Journalists)

    Contraceptive choice and usage is affected by various factors at different stages of reproductive life including childbearing hopes, sexual behavior, health history, exposure to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), ability to use a method consistently and correctly, the side effects and/or health benefits of various methods, and the degree of risk associated with unplanned pregnancy. Survey data indicate that most adults in the US gain family planning information from health professionals as well as from friends and family and the mass media. Perceptions about various methods can influence contraceptive usage in general and method choice in particular. While a majority of US adults find oral contraceptives (OCs) "very" or "somewhat" safe, 21% think OCs are somewhat unsafe, and 11% find them very unsafe. Most safety concerns center on the inability of the OC to protect from STDs and ignore specific health effects that vary for individual women. The fact is that failure to use a contraceptive poses greater risk than any method and that OCs are effective contraceptives that do not hinder future fertility. While the relationship of OC use and breast cancer remains uncertain, OCs are known to protect against ovarian and endometrial cancers. OC use is associated with a relatively small increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and the risk increases in older women and women who smoke. Pregnancy also increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Recent studies reporting 1) an increased risk of venous thrombosis and 2) a decreased risk of myocardial infarction with new formulations of the OC underscore the importance of taking individual circumstances into account when prescribing OCs. The new studies also indicate a need for additional research on the effects of OC use.
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  4. 4
    033419

    Family planning in Colombia: changes in attitude and acceptance, 1964-69.

    Simmons AB; Cardona R

    Ottawa, Canada, International Development Research Centre, 1973. 30 p. (IDRC-009e)

    This paper evaluates the progress of a Latin American population through stages in family planning adoption. The focus is on changes in knowledge of contraception, attitudes, and practices which occurred over 5 years (1964-69) of widespread public discussion concerning family planning and of program activity in Bogota, Colombia. Data from 2 surveys, 1 in 1964 and the other in 1969, permit the 1st temporal analysis of family planning adoption for a major metropolitan city in Latin America. Additional data on rural and small urban areas of Colombia from the 2nd survey permit a limited assessment of diffusion of family planning from the city to the nation as a whole. The 1st survey in Bogota revealed moderate to high levels of knowledge of contraceptive methods and generally favorable attitudes to birth limitation. However, at this time many women had never spoken to their husbands about the number of children they wanted, nor tried a contraceptive method at any time. The 2nd survey showed substantial changes in this picture. The proportion of currently mated women who had spoken to their husbands about family size preference changed from 43 to 62% for an increase of 71%. Fertility fell appreciably over this period, especially among younger women. Family planning program services had a significant direct contribution to the adoption process, since 36% of mated women had been to a clinic by 1969. The most modern methods of birth control -- the anovulatory pill and the intrauterine device -- which were scarcely known in 1964 were widely known in 1969, and contributed most to the observed increase in current contraceptive practice. However, among the previously known methods, the simplest method of all, withdrawal (coitus interruptus), showed the greatest increase in current practice and remained the most commonly used method. These findings suggest that favorable attitudes and knowledge tend to become rather widespread before levels of husband-wife discussion of family size preferences and levels of contraceptive trial increase appreciably. The results also indicate that contraceptive knowledge and favorable family planning attitudes are spreading rapidly outward from the cities into the rural areas, but that contraceptive practice is still predominantly restricted to urban populations. (author's)
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  5. 5
    751693

    Some results of an Irish family planning survey.

    Wilson-Davis K

    Journal of Biosocial Science. October 1975; 7(4):435-444.

    A survey was conducted in 1973 in the Republic of Ireland on the opinions of 754 married women and 194 husbands on the practice of contraception and on the government ban on and the desired availability of contraception. The ban has since been lifted. 54.1% of the women said that the had used family planning at some time. The safe period was the leading method, used by 55%, followed by the pill, which was used by 15.6%. Coitus interruptus was third, being used by 10.2%. Differences in use were found according to age, residence, and social class. Contraception was the highest in the 30-34 age group and in urban areas, where 61% used contraception, compared to 39% in rural areas. Younger women and those of the professional classes tended more toward artificial methods of contraception. Only 3.3% of the agricultural class used an artificial method. More than 75% wanted the government ban on contraceptives repealed. Yet, only 5.5% wanted contraceptives to be made freely available to everybody. Most wanted them restricted to married couples and by prescription only.
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  6. 6
    723020

    National youth survey.

    Silver M; Pomeroy R; Burbank J

    Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Toronto, Canada, April 13-15, 1972. 19 p

    The Gilbert Youth Poll conducted a nationwide survey of 2541 young people between the ages of 14 and 24 in the spring of 1971 for the Research Department of Planned Parenthood World Federation. Of this group 834 were high school students, 948 were college students, and 759 were young people who were not in school. Most of the latter group were older than the high school students and 46% of them have been to college. The findings indicate that 3/4 of this sample approve of making birth control available to any teen-ager wanting this service. Neither sex, race, nor religion affected this attitude. 76% of the white and 58% of the black respondents recommended that couples get professional birth control counseling upon marrying. Most of the respondents plan to marry in their 20s and do not want children during the 1st year of marriage. Variations in these findings did occur among certain subgroups. For example, high school students are less likely to recommend early professional birth control counseling and more likely to approve a child within the 1st year of marriage. About 1/2 the respondents wanted only 2 children while another 1/4 preferred 2 or 3 children. 9 out of 10 indicated the oral contraceptive as an effective birth control method and about 1/2 mentioned the IUD. 11% specified tubal ligation or vasectomy and another 5% stated general sterilization without mention of procedure. Approximately 1/4 noted Planned Parenthood clinics as a place teen-agers could go for birth control services and another 1/5 indicated "family planning clinics." Although population growth in the U.S. was given recognition as a potential problem, it was not regarded as one which required immediate attention. 3 out of 5 expressed some concern over the effect of population growth on their lives, but only a small proportion thought the effect would be serious. Concerning their reasons for family planning, this sample attributed greater importance to child care and economic situation than to social issues such as population.
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