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  1. 1
    181277

    [Formative research. Support for and barriers to the reduction of vertical transmission of HIV / AIDS in El Salvador. Volume 2] Investigacion formativa. Apoyo y barreras para reducir la transmision vertical del VIH / SIDA en El Salvador. Volumen Dos.

    Carranza Flores

    [Washington, D.C.], Academy for Educational Development [AED], CHANGE Project, 2002. [13], 76 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-98-00044-00)

    This publication of the CHANGE Project of the Academy for Educated Development and the Manoff Group International consists of a public opinion survey and discussion guides addressing pregnant women, their partners and health care providers. The in-depth interview questions guides address women who accepted or rejected the offer of an HIV/AIDS text during a prenatal visit, partners/companions of women who accepted or rejected the HIV/AIDS test offered during a prenatal visit, and providers that have offered or now offer the HIV/AIDS test to pregnant women during prenatal visits. Also included are field guides for focus groups consisting of pregnant women, their partners/companions or providers offering prenatal and HIV testing services.
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  2. 2
    181276

    [Formative research. Support for and barriers to the reduction of vertical transmission of HIV / AIDS in El Salvador. Volume 1] Investigacion formativa. Apoyo y barreras para reducir la transmision vertical del VIH / SIDA en El Salvador. Volumen Uno.

    Carranza Flores

    [Washington, D.C.], Academy for Educational Development [AED], CHANGE Project, 2002. [18], 55 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-98-00044-00)

    The most significant findings of the public opinion survey, focus group discussions and in depth interviews are as follows: The study revealed strong support to offer universal HIV testing to pregnant women. There is little resistance from the general public, prenatal care health providers, pregnant women and their spouses/partners to the offer of HIV testing during prenatal care. While there is strong support for HIV testing, knowledge levels of the probability of vertical transmission or of the advantages of HIV testing during prenatal care are very low. 82 % know that HIV test is the only way to know if someone is HIV positive. 96 % say that ALL pregnant women should be tested for HIV AIDS as part of prenatal care visits, after they were told that there is medication available that can reduce the vertical transmission of HIV AIDS. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    098235
    Peer Reviewed

    Providing antenatal services in a primary health care system.

    Al-Nasser AN; Bamgboye EA; Abdullah FA

    JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY HEALTH. 1994 Apr; 19(2):115-23.

    Attitudes of 880 pregnant women attending prenatal clinics at 75 primary health care centers in Al-Baha region of Saudi Arabia were assessed to determine their opinions on maternity services. The study population was predominately aged 18-30 years (62.3%), and 70% were illiterates. 54% were multiparous, and 40% had delivered at home for their prior pregnancy. 15.8% had experienced previous obstetric complications, and 12% experienced complications during delivery. There were significant correlations between place of previous delivery and age, education, and parity of the mother. Increased level of education was related to a higher proportion experiencing hospital delivery. Low parity women had a higher proportion of hospital deliveries. 92.6% believed that prenatal care was important, and 91.3% desired prenatal care services in primary care centers. 49.9% of women desiring prenatal care in primary care centers gave the reason as closeness to home. 47.2% did not desire delivery at a primary care center because the centers were considered poor facilities which lacked privacy and did not have specialists or female doctors or midwives available. 74.1% considered 5-10 prenatal visits appropriate. 8.6% desired less than 5 visits, and 15.3% recommended 10 or more visits. 81.0% kept prenatal care appointments. 79.5% of the women who missed appointments reporting doing so because their spouse could not accompany them or because of distance to the centers. 70% had previously used prenatal care services at primary care centers; 10.9% rated services as poor. Higher recommendations for prenatal care visits were found among younger mothers and lower parity women. More prenatal visits were also associated with previous delivery at health centers.
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  4. 4
    241121

    Genetic risk, prenatal testing, and reproductive decision-making.

    Evers-Kiebooms G

    NIDI/CBGS PUBLICATION. 1994; (30):51-71.

    The main aim of the present paper is to present data about the impact of increased genetic risk upon reproductive decision-making....The first part of this paper summarizes the results of a number of large follow-up studies evaluating the effect of genetic counseling on family planning decisions. The second part of the paper focuses on prenatal testing for congenital handicaps. After a theoretical discussion of this controversial and rapidly changing topic, the results of a recent study in Flanders [Belgium] are summarized, evaluating community attitudes towards prenatal testing. (EXCERPT)
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