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Your search found 13 Results

  1. 1
    333217

    Inter-agency field manual on reproductive health in humanitarian settings. 2010 revision for field review.

    Inter-agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crises

    [New York, New York]. Inter-agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crises, 2010. [222] p.

    The 2010 Inter-agency Field Manual on Reproductive Health in Humanitarian Settings is an update of the 1999 Reproductive Health in Refugee Situations: An Inter-agency Field Manual, the authoritative guidance on reproductive health interventions in humanitarian settings. The 2010 version provides additional guidance on how to implement the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Reproductive Health, a minimum standard of care in humanitarian response. It also splits the original chapter on HIV and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) into two separate chapters to accommodate new guidance on HIV programming. A new chapter on Comprehensive Abortion Care has been developed to cover more than post-abortion care. The chapters on Program Design, Monitoring and Evaluation and Adolescent Reproductive Health have been placed earlier in the manual to address the cross-cutting nature of these topics. Information on human rights and legal considerations has been integrated into each of the thematic chapters to ensure that program staff can address rights-related concerns. The updated information is based on normative technical guidance of the World Health Organization. It also reflects the good practices documented in crisis settings around the world since the initial field-test version was released in 1996. The latest edition reflects the wide application of the Field Manual's principles and technical content beyond refugee situations, extending its use into diverse crises, including conflict zones and natural disasters.
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  2. 2
    315301

    Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2007. [383] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book expands on the coverage of Essentials: It addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    323078

    [Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration] Planificacion familiar: un manual mundial para proveedores. Orientacion basada en la evidencia desarrollada gracias a la colaboracion mundial.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2007. [383] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    328129

    [Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration]

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2008. [489] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book expands on the coverage of Essentials: It addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    333226

    Planning and implementing an essential package of sexual and reproductive health services: Guidance for integrating family planning and STI / RTI with other reproductive health and primary health services.

    Williams K; Warren C; Askew I

    [New York, New York], Population Council, 2010 Oct. [56] p.

    The goal of this guidance document is to provide a framework for developing an essential sexual and reproductive health (SRH) package. It focuses on two priority areas: 1) integrating family planning into maternal and newborn care services, and 2) integrating services for preventing and managing sexually transmitted infections / reproductive tract infections into primary healthcare services. This guidance document comprises three sections. The Introduction explains and justifies why the development and implementation of an essential SRH package should be planned and framed within the World Health Organization's six Building Blocks of Health Systems. The second section presents the "How To" steps and checklist tools for planning, implementing and scaling up, including specific examples for the two priority areas indicated above. The third section provides the evidence-base supporting the recommendations and action-points proposed in each tool. This evidence-base includes key findings and summary recommendations from a literature review (in matrix format) and a bibliography of the references included in the literature review.
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  6. 6
    187374

    Using international guidelines to support national policy in maternal and newborn healthcare. Case Study No. 3.

    Crump S

    In: Shaping policy for maternal and newborn health: a compendium of case studies, edited by Sandra Crump. Baltimore, Maryland, JHPIEGO, 2003 Oct. 29-36.

    One of the ways that national governments solidify and communicate their commitment to safe motherhood and newborn health is through their national policy and service delivery guidelines, which outline a management and service delivery approach for achieving specific standards of care in healthcare facilities. In developing these guidelines --and the facilities and providers to support them--policymakers at the national level generally look to expert opinion and international consensus regarding practices and models that have been proven effective in other countries. The collection, synthesis, and publication of internationally endorsed maternal and newborn healthcare practices can therefore provide an important support and catalyst for policy change at the national level. International guidelines can provide both a focus for national policy dialogue and development and a technical reference to help ensure that national policies follow current scientific evidence and thinking. This case study describes how the international guidelines in the World Health Organization's (WHO's) manual Managing Complications in Pregnanq and Childbirth: A Guide for Midwives and Doctors (MCPC) have influenced policy development in countries where JHPIEGO and the Maternal and Neonatal Health (MNI-1) Program have been working to increase the use of skilled care for women and newborns and increase maternal and newborn survival. The MCPC manual was published as part of WHO's Integrated Management of Pregnancy and Childbirth (IMPAC) series, the technical component of WHO's Making Pregnancy Safer strategy aimed at reducing maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity and improving maternal and newborn health. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    133320

    Managing maternal and child health programmes: a practical guide.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 1997. [8], 65 p. (Western Pacific Education in Action, Series No. 10)

    The health of mothers and children in developing countries continues to lag far behind that in the developed world. As a result of cultural factors and a lack of access to essential services, women are often denied freedom of reproductive choice. This manual was prepared by the World Health Organization to assist managers of health services, especially at the district level, to ensure the availability of high-quality maternal-child health/family planning (MCH/FP) care in developing countries. MCH/FP program management has gained recognition as an essential component of adequate reproductive health care. Practical guidelines are presented on how to plan, implement, and evaluate MCH/FP programs as well as how to establish objectives, strategies, training activities, and evaluation procedures.
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  8. 8
    099740

    Care of mother and baby at the health centre: a practical guide. Report of a technical working group.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Division of Family Health. Maternal Health and Safe Motherhood Programme

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Division of Family Health, Maternal Health and Safe Motherhood Programme, 1994. [3], 55 p. (Safe Motherhood Practical Guide; WHO/FHE/MSM/94.2)

    This report is designed for health planners and program managers to improve access to health and to decentralize maternal and newborn health care. It covers secondary care services that traditional birth attendants (TBAs), midwives, and other nonphysician health workers in health centers can perform. Specifically, it defines the tasks and skills required to provide comprehensive care of mother and infant at the health center and in the community. It also looks at the role of the health center in training, supervision, and continuing logistic support for community based care. The first chapter examines the health center's role in maternal health and the 3 approaches to integrated care: vertical integration, integration across time, and horizontal integration. The next chapter reviews the essential elements of obstetric and neonatal care, including sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS. Topics discussed in the chapter on developing and maintaining a functional referral system include referral protocols, functional links with referral centers, obstetric first aid, maternity waiting homes, transport and communication, and reception of referred cases in referral centers. Institutional support mechanisms (chapter 4) are training; teamwork and supervision; logistics, maintenance, and essential drugs and supplies; management, communication, and interpersonal skills; and data collection and research. Topics included in the chapter on community support systems are TBA training and retraining, integrating the TBA into the health care system, IEC, and community support mechanisms for the health of mothers and newborns. The last chapter revolves around evaluation and monitoring, including estimating catchment area and coverage, monitoring quality of care for mothers and newborns, performance indicators, record keeping, and home-based maternal records.
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  9. 9
    101248

    The mother-baby package: WHO's guide to saving women's and infants' lives.

    SAFE MOTHERHOOD NEWSLETTER. 1994 Jul-Oct; (15):4-7.

    WHO has developed guidelines to health interventions for safe motherhood entitled the Mother-Baby Package. The guidelines are the minimum levels of care that all pregnant women and newborns should receive. Even though they can be used in any country, they are designed for countries with the most severe problems and most acute constraints on resources. The Package spells out in detail how to prevent and treat pregnancy complications. Basically, prenatal care is needed to recognize complications. Health facilities are needed so the complications can be treated. Women should receive family planning counseling to prevent unplanned and unwanted pregnancies. WHO provides specific guidelines on early diagnosis and health interventions at different levels of care (community, health center, and district hospital) for each major cause of maternal and neonatal mortality. There must be rapid referral and efficient transport of mothers and newborns with emergency conditions to a facility equipped to handle these cases. It emphasizes the need for cleanliness during delivery. WHO also has guidelines on postpartum care of mother and child. It advocates putting the newborn to the breast as soon as possible after birth and exclusive breast feeding. WHO introduced the Mother-Baby Package to health planners from some countries with high maternal mortality levels (Bangladesh, Benin, Ethiopia, Guinea, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nepal, Uganda, Viet Nam, Yemen, and Zambia) in April 1994. Mongolia was the first country to translate the Package. District health managers and obstetricians adapted the interventions for local conditions in Mongolia. District health teams are set to implement the interventions soon.
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  10. 10
    105265

    Training in maternal-child health / family planning.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1990. [4], 13 p. (Programme Advisory Note)

    UNFPA has published this Programme Advisory Note to orientate its field officers and other program staff to practical issues and obstacles in the design and implementation of maternal and child health/family planning (MCH/FP) training. It serves as a manual for needs assessment, project formulation, project monitoring, and evaluation. This Note emphasizes training activities for MCH/FP services in the community, at health centers, or in the smaller hospitals. It provides a brief description of the characteristics of countries with successful MCH/FP services (e.g., a clear straightforward policy pronouncing political commitment to MCH/FP). The Note begins with addressing issues and problems in MCH/FP training as they apply to health policies, including strategies and planning for training; curricula; and teaching and assessment methodology and materials. Integration of FP, MCH, and primary health care services, decentralization, definition of job descriptions, forecasting human resource needs, and multiplier/cascade training fall under the category of health policy-related issues and problems in training. Curricula-related issues revolve around coordination with job descriptions and between learning objectives and topics and learning objectives and teaching methods, integration of MCH/FP within curricula, time allocation, control of curricula and the process of curricula development, and in-service training. Teaching and assessment methodology and materials-related issues include the need for teacher training, appropriate teaching methods, teaching facilities, teaching/learning materials, and assessment methods. The Note then covers the role of external support and technical assistance for MCH/FP training, specifically technical capacities of donor agencies, cooperation, and modality of support. The modes of support include support for within country courses, fellowships to attend overseas courses and study tours, technical advisors, and supporting teachers.
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  11. 11
    115476

    Integrating maternal and child health services with primary health care: practical considerations.

    Hart RH; Belsey MA; Tarimo E

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 1990. iii, 92 p.

    The introductory chapter in this book notes that it is aimed at program managers and that it examines the integration of maternal-child health services (including family planning) with primary health care. The book identifies barriers to such integration, clarifies the issues involved, and provides examples of current innovations in the field. Chapter 2 provides background information on maternal and child health and primary health care. The third chapter gives an overview of program-related issues such as putting integration in place, the use of static versus mobile health units, expanded coverage, utilization of the work-force, appropriate technology, support services, cost effectiveness, using the epidemiological concepts of relative and attributable risk, health systems research, community relations, and finances. Chapter 4 considers how to plan integrated services at the community, health center, district, and national levels. The summary contained in the final chapter points out that the integration of maternal-child health services within primary health care will lead to wider health coverage, more efficient use of personnel, and greater cost effectiveness.
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  12. 12
    375409

    Caring for newborns and children in the community. Planning handbook for programme managers and planners.

    Marsh D; Shirey PW

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization, Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health, 2015. 168 p.

    Prevention and treatment services need to be brought closer to children who are not adequately reached by the health system. To help meet this need, WHO and UNICEF have developed state-of-the-art packages to enable community health workers to care for pregnant women, newborns and children. Caring for Newborns and Children in the Community comprises three packages of materials for training and support of CHWs. Countries will assess their current community-based services and choose to what extent they are able to implement these packages for improving child and maternal health and survival: (1) Caring for the newborn at home, (2) caring for the child's healthy growth and development, (3) caring for the sick child in the community.
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  13. 13
    323639

    Programme reporting standards for sexual, reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 32 p.

    Information about design, context, implementation, monitoring and evaluation is central to understanding the processes and impacts of sexual, reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health (SRMNCAH) programmes, in support of effective replication and scale-up of these efforts. Existing reporting guidelines do not demand sufficient detail in the reporting of contextual and implementation issues. We have, therefore, developed programme reporting standards (PRS) to provide guidance for complete and accurate reporting on the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation processes of SRMNCAH programmes. The PRS can be used by SRMNCAH programme implementers and researchers. The PRS can be used prospectively to guide the reporting of a programme throughout its life cycle, or retrospectively to describe what was done, when, where, how and by whom. The PRS is intended as a guide for implementation researchers who need to document important details of implementation and context in addition to the results of their studies. The PRS is intended for programme managers and other staff or practitioners who have designed, implemented and/or evaluated SRMNCAH programmes. It can be used by governmental and nongovernmental organizations, bilateral and multilateral agencies, as well as by the private sector. The PRS is also intended as a guide for implementation researchers who need to document important details of implementation and context in addition to the results of their studies
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