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  1. 1
    077732

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world, 1988/1989: multilateral organization assistance, regional organization assistance, bilateral agency assistance, non-governmental organization and other assistance.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [1990]. [12], 932 p.

    The UNFPA periodically releases a publication listing population projects supported and/or operated by various organizations. This publication also has basic demographic data and each country's population policy. The 16th edition covers the period from January 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989. The first section reviews all the countries' programs and makes up the bulk of the publication. Each division in this section begins with demographic data, followed by the government's views about population growth, specifically as it affects mortality and morbidity; fertility, nuptiality, and family; spatial distribution and urbanization; international migration. Each division next examines the population projects and external assistance. The second section examines regional, interregional, and global programs. The regional programs are divided into Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and Western Asia, and Europe. The next section lists published information sources including those used to compile the country, regional, interregional, and global reports. Other sources include periodic publications from various agencies and organizations which provide current information about population, addresses to obtain additional information, and a listing of UNFPA representatives (names, addresses, and telephone numbers) in the field. The Inventory concludes with a detailed index.
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  2. 2
    268274

    The World Health Organization's Expanded Programme on Immunization: a global overview. Le Programme Elargi de Vaccination de L'Organization Mondiale de la Sante: apercu mondial.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI]

    World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel de Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales. 1985; 38(2):232-52.

    In recognition that immunization is an essential element of primary health care, the World Health Organization (WHO), with other agencies, is sponsoring the Global Program on Immunization whose goal is to reduce morbidity and mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases by providing immunization for all children of the world by 1990. A global advisory group of experts meets yearly to review the program. This paper summarizes the most salient features of the 1984 meeting. The major event for the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) in 1984 was the Bellagio Conference on protecting the world's children. Activities undertaken as a result of this conference are discussed. 1 outcome was the formation of the Task Force for Child Survival whose main objective is to promote the reduction of childhood morbidity and mortality through acceleration of key primary health care activities. Focus is on supporting Colombia, India and Senegal in accelerating the expansion of their immunization programs and strengthening other elements of primary health care, such as diarrheal diseases control, family planning and improved nutrition. The 5-point action program consists of the following components: promoting EPI within the context of primary health care; investing adequate human resources in EPI; ensuring that programs are continuously evaluated and adapted so as to achieve high immunization coverage and maximum reduction in target-disease deaths and cases; and pursuing research efforts as part of program operations. EPI has continued to collaborate with other programs to help assure that immunization services are provided to support delivery of other services. Integration of EPI in Africa, the Americas, the Eastern Mediterranean Region, Europe, the South-East Asia Region, and the Western Pacific Region is examined.
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  3. 3
    320847
    Peer Reviewed

    Obstetric fistula: Guiding principles for clinical management and programme development, a new WHO guideline.

    de Bernis L

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2007 Nov; 99 Suppl 1:S117-S121.

    It is estimated that more than 2 million women are living with obstetric fistulas (OFs) worldwide, particularly in Africa and Asia, and yet this severe morbidity remains hidden. As a contribution to the global Campaign to End Fistula, the World Health Organization (WHO) published Obstetric fistula: Guiding principles for clinical management and programme development, a manual intended as a practical working document. Its 3 main objectives are to draw attention to the urgency of the OF issue and serve as an advocacy document for prompt action; provide policy makers and health professionals with brief, factual information and principles that will guide them at the national and regional levels as they develop strategies and programs to prevent and treat OFs; and assist health care professionals as they acquire better skills and develop more effective services to care for women treated for fistula repair. (author's)
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  4. 4
    189046

    Romania: AIDS time bomb. The authorities are struggling to deal with rising levels of HIV infection.

    Tuchel D

    London, England, Institute for War and Peace Reporting [IWPR], 2003 Oct 31. 4 p. (Balkan Crisis Report No. 466)

    A combination of fear, ignorance and poor health care is threatening to spark an AIDS epidemic in Romania. The ministry of health and family last year estimated that more than 12,500 people were either HIV-positive or living with full-blown AIDS - the majority of them young people. While the health care system has improved over the last decade, it remains in need of reforms and investment - public expenditure on health is the lowest in the region. Aware of the looming threat of an epidemic, the Bucharest authorities have declared prevention and treatment a priority. They launched an Action Plan for Universal Access to HIV/AIDS Treatment in 2001 as part of a UN initiative to combat the virus, allocating 25 US million dollars for the project. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    142054

    Statement by representative of Ukraine.

    Ukraine

    [Unpublished] 1999. Presented at the United Nations Commission on Population and Development, Thirty-second session, New York, New York, March 22-31, 1999 [3] p.

    This is a statement concerning the "Report in world population and monitoring," by the representative of Ukraine at the Thirty-second session of the UN Commission on population and development, March 1999. The general social and economic situation in the Ukraine--particularly the consequences of last year's financial crisis--continues to have a negative impact on the development of basic demographic trends and population reproduction (population has been declining at an annual rate of almost 0.4 million). Reasons for population decrease include the following: (a) falling birth rate, (b) death (morbidity and mortality) due to the change in social and economic relationships, and (c) infectious diseases. The social and demographic situation in Ukraine is marked by the following trends: a progressive aging of the population and a worsening of the nation's general health. In response to these trends, the government of the Ukraine has implemented an Action Plan aimed at improving the country's demographic situation.
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  6. 6
    068651

    Foodborne illness: a growing problem.

    Abdussalam M; Grossklaus D

    WORLD HEALTH. 1991 Jul-Aug; 18-9.

    90% of individual cases of foodborne illness in industrialized countries are unreported and as such do not appear in official morbidity statistics. This figure grows to 99% in non-industrialized countries, yet in developed countries the associated cost of these illnesses is estimated at US$10,000 million/year. Microbiological contaminants are responsible for 90% of the episodes of foodborne illness including: typhoid fever, non-typhoid salmonelloses, cholera, diarrhoeal diseases, bacterial and amoebic dysenteries, botulism, hepatitis A, and trichinellosis. In industrialized countries most of these illnesses have declined; however, salmonellosis and a few others have increased 10 to 20 fold in countries like Germany. Similar trends are present in the US. Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom. In the Netherlands it was recently estimated that 1.5 million cases of foodborne, microbial diseases occurred in a population of 15 million. Contaminants are dangerous because their numbers can be so great that our normal defenses are overcome. Some can produce toxic chemicals that are not destroyed during cooking. The WHO has created 10 golden rules to follow in food preparation and storage. These rules were created to be practical for low-income economies and households.
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  7. 7
    038647

    [Effectiveness of the expanded programme on immunization] Efficacite du programme elargi de vaccination

    Keja K; Chan C; Brenner E; Henderson R

    World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel de Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales. 1986; 39(2):161-70.

    The Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) aims at the reduction of morbidity and mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases through the provision of immunization to women and children. Program effectiveness is measured by immunization coverage and by incidence of the target diseases. Information on these 2 indicators is provided by national programs to WHO Regional Offices and forwarded to EPI, Geneva. Although considerable progress has been made in delivering vaccines to the children of the world, the potential impact of immunization remains unfulfilled. In the developing world (excluding China) less than 40% of infants receive a 3rd dose of DPT or polio vaccines, and coverage with measles vaccine remains at only 1/2 of that level. Over 3 million children still die each year from measles, neonatal tetanus and pertussis, while over a 1/4 of a million children are crippled by poliomyelitis. In the European Region the coverage goal of the EPI has been largely achieved. In the American Region dramatic progress has been made since the beginning of EPI. The South-East Asia Region has made steady progress since the start of the EPI. The Western Pacific Region is the most heterogenous within WHO, with countries ranging in size from the smallest to the largest in the world. Levels of socioeconomic development and immunization coverage also differ widely. Nevertheless, satisfactory progress is observed in the majority of countries. In the African Region, the problems of drought, famine and civil unrest are extensive. Despite these problems, progress has been satisfactory and exemplary in a few countries. In the Eastern Mediterranean Region, progress in increasing immunization coverage has been remarkably good. It will be difficult, however, to improve immunization services for the remainder of the decade in a number of countries currently ravaged by drought, famine and civil unrest.
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  8. 8
    070166

    Poland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 30-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Poland's 1985 population of 37,203,000 is projected to grow to 45,066,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 25.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 13,8% were over the age of 60. 19.6% and 22.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 9.6 to 3.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 70.9 to 77.3 years, the crude death rate will increase from 9.6 to 9.8, while infant mortality will decline from 20.0 to 7.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.3 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 19.2 to 13.1. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 75.0, while the 1984 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.8 years. Urban population will increase from 61.0% in 1985 to 71.0% overall by the year 2025. Population size and growth, fertility, immigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population age structure, mortality, morbidity, and too high emigration are not. Poland has an explicit population policy. Aiming to establish a stable population, policies control internal migration while governing efforts to improve mortality and living conditions. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  9. 9
    070167

    Portugal.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 34-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Portugal's 1985 population of 10,157,000 is projected to grow to 10,935,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 23.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.0% were over the age of 60. 17.1% and 24.8% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 5.1 to 0.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 72.2 to 78.8 years, the crude death rate will increase from 9.6 to 10.6, while infant mortality will decline from 20.0 to 6.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.0 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 14.7 to 11.4. The 1979/80 contraceptive prevalence rate was 66.3, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.1 years. Urban population will increase from 31.2% in 1985 to 57.8% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, immigration, and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while mortality and spatial distribution are not. Portugal does not have an explicit population policy. Socioeconomic measures are, however, in place to address spatial distribution, and support emigration and the return of emigrants, education, social security, health, and family planning. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data system are also explored.
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  10. 10
    070170

    Romania.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 46-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Romania's 1985 population of 22,725,000 is projected to grow to 25,745,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 24.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 14.4% were over the age of 60. 18.4% and 20.9% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 5.6 to 1.7 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 69.6 to 77.1 years, the crude death rate will increase from 10.2 to 10.4, while infant mortality will decline from 26.0 to 7.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.2 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 15.8 to 12.2. The 1978 contraceptive prevalence rate was 58.0, while the 1977 female mean age at 1st marriage was 21.1 years. Urban population will increase from 49.0% in 1985 to 60.9% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, mortality, international migration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while too low fertility is not. Romania has an explicit population policy. Fully-integrated in socioeconomic policy, it aims to increase population growth rates to achieve a target total population of 30 million by the year 2000. The government will encourage higher fertility, lower mortality, a consolidated family, an adjusted age structure, and affirm the role of women as active participants in social development. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  11. 11
    070184

    Spain.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 110-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Spain's 1985 population of 38,602,000 is projected to grown to 42,530,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 22.9% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.1% were over the age of 60. 16.6% and 26.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 5.6 to 0.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 75.8 to 80.3 years, the crude birth death rate will increase from 7.7 to 10.3, while infant mortality will decline from 11.0 to 6.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.8 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 13.3 to 11.0. The 1985 contraceptive prevalence rate was 59.4, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.1 years. Urban population will increase from 75.8% in 1985 to 88.8% overall by the year 2025. All of these indicators and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government. Spain, therefore, does not have an explicit population policy. The government considers the country's demographic situation to be stable, and deems fertility to be an individual matter. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken regarding the above-mentioned demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  12. 12
    070200

    Sweden.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 130-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Sweden's 1985 population of 8,350,000 is projected to shrink to 8,136,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 17.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 23.6% were over the age of 60. 15.6% and 30.0% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 0.3 to -2.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.3 to 80.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 11.0 to 12.7, while infant mortality will decline from 7.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.7 to 1.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 11.3 to 10.4. The 1981 contraceptive prevalence rate was 78.1, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 27.6 years. Urban population will increase from 83.4% in 1985 to 90.5% overall by the year 2025. All of these indicators and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government while only spatial distribution is marginally not. Sweden does not have an explicit population policy. Population policies are part and parcel of broader socioeconomic policy, with, nonetheless, an interest in limiting future levels of immigration and adjusting urban-rural spatial imbalance. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  13. 13
    070201

    Switzerland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 134-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Switzerland's 1985 population of 6,470,000 is projected to shrink to 6,118,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 16.9% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 19.6% were over the age of 60. 14.3% and 33.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 2.3 to --4.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.3 to 80.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 9.3 to 13.5, while infant mortality will decline from 8.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.5 to 1.7, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 11.6 to 9.3. The 1980 contraceptive prevalence rate was 71.2, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 25.0 years. Urban population will increase from 58.2% in 1985 to 69.5% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, mortality, morbidity, spatial distribution, and international migration levels are considered to be acceptable by the government, while the low fertility level is not. Switzerland has an explicit population policy. Indirect measures will be applied in attempts to raise fertility. These would include improving the situation of families and children, and imposing more stringent regulations on immigration. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  14. 14
    070208

    Turkey.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 162-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Turkey's 1985 population of 50,345,000 is projected to grow to 89,646,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 36.4% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.4% were over the age of 60. 22.9% and 13.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 20.8 to 9.0 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 61.6 to 74.6 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 9.4 to 6.7, while infant mortality will decline from 92.0 to 19.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 3.9 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 30.2 to 16.3. The 1983 contraceptive prevalence rate was 51.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 20.7 years. Urban population will increase from 45.9% in 1985 to 69.8% overall by the year 2025. Significant immigration and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high population growth, fertility, mortality, and low emigration are not. Turkey has an explicit population policy. It aims to reduce population growth and fertility through family planning programs and family welfare provisions, reduce mortality through expanded, local-level public health services, and reduce migration to urban areas. Policy supports increased emigration. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  15. 15
    070214

    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 186-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland's 1985 population of 56,618,000 is projected to grow to 57,464,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 19.2% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 20.7% were over the age of 60. 17.2% and 27.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 1.3 to -0.1 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.0 to 79.6 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 11.7 to 11.5, while infant mortality will decline from 11.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.8 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 13.0 to 11.4. The 1983 contraceptive prevalence rate was 83, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.8 years. Urban population will increase from 91.7% in 1985 to 95.8% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, spatial distribution, and low emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while mortality and high immigration are not. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland does not have an explicit population policy. Recent legislation has, however, been enacted to stem the flow of immigrants into the country. The government considers decisions on fertility and child-bearing best left to individuals and limits itself to providing family planning and health information and services. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  16. 16
    071951

    Monaco.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 178-81. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Monaco's 1985 population of 27,000 is projected to grow to 35,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 29.0% of the population was over the age of 60, and the crude birth and death rates were 20.0. The growth rate was 0.8, with no rate of natural increase over the period 1980-85. Morbidity, mortality, immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth and fertility are not. Monaco does not have an explicit population policy. The government does, however, hope to stem future immigration and realize higher rates of fertility. Social welfare, family allowances, and assistance to young married couples are provided to meet this letter objective. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  17. 17
    071871

    Czechoslovakia.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 158-61. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Czechoslovakia's 1985 population of 15,579,000 is projected to grow to 18,157,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 24.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 16.3% were over the age of 60. 19.9% and 21.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 3.5 to 2.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 71.0 to 76.7 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 12.0 to 11.0, while infant mortality will decline from 15.9 to 6.5. The fertility rate will remain static over the period of 2.1, and the crude birth rate will drop from 15.4 to 13.8. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 95.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 21.6 years. Urban population will increase from 65.3% in 1985 to 76.3% overall by the year 2025. All of these trends and indicators are considered to be good by the government. Czechoslovakia has an explicit population policy. The government of Czechoslovakia finds social and economic development to be centrally important in solving population-related problems. Policy therefore shies away from attempting to directly affect population size, and aims instead to improve the age structure, state of health, level of education, and socio-professional composition of the population. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  18. 18
    071875

    Denmark.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 174-7. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Denmark's 1985 population of 5,122,000 is projected to shrink to 4,690,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 18.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 20.1% were over the age of 60. 14.1% and 29.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from -0.6 to -5.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.5 to 77.5 years, the crude death rate will increase from 11.3 to 14.4, while infant mortality will decline from 8.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise of the period from 1.5 to 1.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 10.7 to 9.1. The 1975 contraceptive prevalence rate was 63.0, while the 1982 female mean age at 1st marriage was 26.1 years. Urban population will increase form 85.9% in 1985 to 91.8% overall by the year 2025. All of these trends and indicators are considered to be acceptable by the government. Denmark does not have an explicit population policy. The government aims to affect neither birth rate nor population growth. Health policy is in place to improve the quality of life, while other measures are being adopted to develop rural areas. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  19. 19
    071892

    Greece.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 22-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Greece's 1985 population of 9,878,000 is projected to grow to 10,789,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 21.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.8% were over the age of 60. 18.6% and 23.8% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 4.8 to 0.9 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.0 to 77.7 years, the crude death rate will increase from 10.1 to 11.6, while infant mortality will decline from 16.2 to 8.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.2 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 14.9 to 12.5. Urban population will increase from 60.1% in 1985 to 79.1% overall by the year 2025. Spatial distribution, in part, and insignificant emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and immigration are not. Greece has an explicit population policy. The government hopes to increase fertility, population growth, and improve the quality of health care. Specifically, policy aims to remove disincentives to procreation through the betterment of social services and the quality of life. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  20. 20
    071900

    Hungary.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 54-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Hungary's 1985 population of 10,697,000 is projected to shrink to 10,598,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 21.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 18.2% were over the age of 60. 71.8% and 24.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from-0.3 to -0.6 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 70.3 to 76.4 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 13.1 to 12.9, while infant mortality will decline from 20.1 to 7.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.9 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 12.9 to 12.3. The 1986 contraceptive prevalence rate was 73.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 21.0 years. Urban population will increase from 56.2% in 1985 to 67.5% overall by the year 2025. Immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, and fertility are not. Hungary has an explicit population policy. It hopes to increase population growth by increasing fertility and improving living conditions. Additionally, changes are sought in population age structure, mortality, and overall health status of the population. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  21. 21
    071901

    Iceland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 58-61. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Iceland's 1985 population of 243,000 is projected to grow to 304, 000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 26.6% of the population was aged 0.14 years, while 13.8% were over the age of 60. 18.0% and 23.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 12.3 to 2.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.8 to 78.3 years, the crude death rate will increase from 7.2 to 9.6, while infant mortality will decline from 6.4 to 5.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.4 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 19.5 to 11.9. The 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.8 years. Urban population will increase from 89.4% in 1985 to 93.3% overall by the year 2025. All levels and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government. Iceland does not have an explicit population policy. Concern is instead focused upon improving rural health services. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  22. 22
    071906

    Ireland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 78-81. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Ireland's 1985 population of 3,608,000 is projected to grow to 5,326,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 29.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 14.4% were over the age of 60. 21.0% and 17.0% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 11.8 to 6.5 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 73.0 to 77.3 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 9.5 to 7.7, while infant mortality will decline from 10.2 to 5.5. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 3.1 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 21.3 to 14.2. The 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.4 years. Urban population will increase from 57.0% in 1985 to 76.4% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, immigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while emigration is not. Ireland does not have an explicit population policy. The government does, however, aim to hold present fertility and population growth rates, adjust spatial distribution, and stem emigration. A committee has been charged with the responsibility of advising for emigration welfare services. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  23. 23
    071852

    Bulgaria.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 82-5. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Bulgaria's 1985 population of 9.071,000 is projected to grow to 10,070,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 22.3% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.33% were over the age of 60. 20.0% and 22.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 4.7 to 1.9 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 71.6 to 76.8 years, the crude death rate will increase from 11.0 to 11.6, while infant mortality will decline from 17.6 to 7.2. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.2 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 15.7 to 13.5. The 1976 contraceptive prevalence rate was 76.0, while the 19890 female mean age at 1st marriage was 221.6 years. Urban population will increase from 66.5% in 1985 to 83.4% overall by the year 2025. Morbidity, mortality, immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while too low population growth and fertility are not. Bulgaria has an explicit population policy. Demographic policy aims to maintain moderate and stable population growth, provide for individual health, increase job opportunities, and improve living conditions and spatial distribution. Higher fertility and subsequent population growth are encouraged. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discusses, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  24. 24
    071885

    Finland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 214-7. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Finland's 1985 population of 4,891,000 is projected to grow to 4,994,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 19.3% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.2% were over the age of 60. 16.5% and 28.0% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 3.4 to -2.4 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 73.8 to 77.3 years, the crude death rate will increase from 9.9 to 13.3, while infant mortality will decline from 6.2 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.7 to 1.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 13.3 to 10.9. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 80.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 24.6 years. Urban population will increase from 64.0% in 1985 to 83.5% overall by the year 2025. All of these trends and indicators are considered to be acceptable by the government. Comparatively high morbidity and mortality among males, however, is of concern. Causes for such excess mortality include cardiovascular diseases, cancer, accidents, and suicide. Finland does not have an explicit population policy. Attention is presently directed toward morbidity and mortality, promoting and supporting the family, and adjusting spatial distribution. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  25. 25
    071886

    France.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 218-21. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    France's 1985 population of 54,621,000 is projected to grow to 58,431,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 21.3% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.7% were over the age of 60. 17.8% and 25.9% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 3.4 to 0.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.5 to 77.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 11.2 to 11.8, while infant mortality will decline from 9.2 to 5.2. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.9 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 14.5 to 12.1. The 1978 contraceptive prevalence rate was 79.0, while the 1982 female mean age at 1st marriage was 24.3 years. Urban population will increase from 73.4% in 1985 to 77.3% overall by the year 2025. Morbidity, mortality, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, fertility, and immigration are not. France has an explicit population policy. Concerned over the low growth rate of the native-born population, policy aims to increase fertility an population growth by improving the socioeconomic status of families, lowering the mortality rate, and restricting most types of immigration. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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