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  1. 1
    184946

    Problems of indigenous peoples living in cities should be addressed, Permanent Forum told.

    New York, New York, United Nations, 2002 May 21. 5 p. (HR/4600)

    The Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues should discuss the situation of indigenous peoples living in urban areas, an indigenous representative told the Forum today, as it continued its review of United Nations activities relating to indigenous peoples. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    292222

    Africa's cities may face a dry and dirty future.

    Sen Y

    Habitat Debate. 2002 Jun; 8(2):15-16.

    Water management and pollution are the most critical issues affecting water access today, as affirmed by UN Secretary- General Kofi Annan, during World Water Day, 22 May, 2002, when he stated that, "Even where supplies are plentiful, they are increasingly at risk from pollution and rising demand". The Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), estimates that presently, some 1.1 billion people on earth are without access to clean water and over 2.4 billion are without adequate sanitation. This concern led the organization to launch the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for All (WASH) campaign. UN-HABITAT, which is also involved in this campaign, is increasing its role in urban water issues. It started with the innovative programme, Water for African Cities in seven demonstration cities: Abidjan (Cote d'Ivoire), Accra (Ghana), Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), Dakar (Senegal), Johannesburg (South Africa), Lusaka (Zambia) and Nairobi (Kenya). UN-HABITAT has also recently been mandated by the third World Water Forum to play a leading role in raising international awareness on water and cities. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    292229

    How gender-sensitive is your city?

    Michaud A

    Habitat Debate. 2002 Dec; 8(4):[3] p..

    Seven years down the road from the first international conference on “Women in the City, Housing, Services and the Urban Environment” (Paris, OECD 1994), much has been achieved, especially in the context of the follow-up to the City Summit (Istanbul , 1996) and the growth of international networking on issues related to Women in local governance. What we are witnessing is the concrete implementation of city policies, structures and mechanisms aimed at ensuring equal access to decision-making at the city and borough level, as well as equal access to services and resources delivered at these levels of urban governance. A number of “ingredients” are used in cities of the North, as well as cities of the South, both big and small. Although these ingredients differ in scope, themes and priorities, within different social, economic, cultural and political contexts, “gender equality in urban governance” seems to be a cross-cutting issue. This offers great opportunities for “City-to-City cooperation”, through development of case studies, knowledge and practice sharing amongst all partners involved: elected officials, city managers and staff, women’s, grass roots and community based organizations, unions, researchers, national associations of local governments and global organizations and networks. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    292225

    Towards woman-friendly cities.

    Seaforth W

    Habitat Debate. 2002 Dec; 8(4):[3] p..

    A woman from the Philippines, one of the early writers on community participation, tells the story about how she started working and writing on the subject. In the early 1980s, she was introducing projects to urban poor communities and telling the people what the government wanted to do for them. Eventually the same communities started asking her “if we tell you what we want, can you tell the government and will anything be done?” Later on in Latin America, one of the early homes of popular urban movements, civil society started questioning the role of community participation. The following grafitti was seen in a poor neighbourhood in a Latin American city in the late 1980s: “don’t ask me about my participation, I want to know what is my government’s participation”. In the new millennium, we have come full circle vis a vis involving city residents in running the affairs of their cities. While the situation is by no means perfect, it is now quite normal to talk about such concepts as participatory governance, participatory budgeting, planning with communities, and building the capacity of local authorities to enable them to relate better with civil society in the process of governance. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    292226

    Women's participation in the city consultation process.

    Habitat Debate. 2002 Dec; 8(4):[3] p..

    Over the past fifteen years, there has been increasing evidence of the advantages of involving “the beneficiaries” in the development process. From a relatively passive involvement as providers of information, this involvement has changed both quantitatively and qualitatively, so that it is now accepted that the stakeholders should be involved in all stages of the process from design to implementation and evaluation. Through such involvement, civil society, especially the poor, effectively become partners in the project and the development process. The Urban Management Programme (UMP), a joint programme of UN-HABITAT, UNDP and the World Bank, has extended this principle to other domains of governance, partly out of recognition that government alone is not able to decide on the priority issues and the future vision for the city. More significantly, bringing the civil society into the development process as partners provides more than just additional resources. The increase in commitment, knowledge and expertise plus the shared sense of ownership provide better chances for successful outcomes. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    292224

    Editorial.

    Habitat Debate. 2002 Dec; 8(4):[2] p..

    Imagine a city where women and men, girls and boys, walk freely without fear of violence or intimidation, where child day-care centres and crèches are an integral part of the urban infrastructure, and where a woman’s voice is as loud as a man’s in all aspects of urban governance. In other words, imagine a woman-friendly city. In this issue of Habitat Debate, we take a critical look at the ways in which women have been denied power, services and resources in their cities and, also, at the various initiatives that have sprung up in recent decades to make cities more livable for women. For many women, the city is an ominous place, full of lurking dangers and potential threats. Violence – or the threat of it – has severely hindered women’s mobility in cities, especially at night. Impractical zoning laws, inflexible public transport routes and schedules, lack of childcare facilities and anonymous public spaces have made city life a nightmare for many women. At the municipal level, although more and more women are getting elected into municipal councils, their overall representation is still not equal to men’s, which means they have less power and authority to impact the way their cities are managed and governed. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    292262

    Manzese Ward, Dar es Salaam.

    Habitat Debate. 2002 Dec; 8(4):[1] p..

    The Manzese Ward was among the first areas in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to implement crime prevention initiatives under the framework of UN-HABITAT’s Safer Cities Programme. Safer Cities worked with the Manzese women and ward leadership to conduct a Safety Audit for women in two selected areas of the Ward. A two-day discussion accompanied with an exploratory walk was conducted by the group of women who have lived in the area for not less than five years. Guided by a map, the women led the team of Safer Cities and Ward officers into the area through all streets, paths, open spaces and unfinished buildings expressing their experiences of criminal activities at each point. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    292263

    Crushed homes, crushed lives.

    Scholz B

    Habitat Debate. 2002 Dec; 8(4):[3] p..

    For most women, the home is the single most important place in the world. Beyond shelter, it is a place of employment, where income is generated; it is a place to care for children; and it provides respite from violence in the streets. For some women, the home may be the only place where they can participate in social activities. The interconnectedness and particular relationship women have with housing suggests that a practice like forced eviction will have an acute and disparate impact on women’s lives. According the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, forced eviction is the involuntary, permanent or temporary removal of a person from his/her home or land, directly or indirectly attributable to the State, without the provision of, or access to, legal and other forms of protection The United Nations Commission on Human Rights has deemed the practice of forced evictions to be a “gross violation of human rights, in particular the right to housing.” General Comment No. 7 to the Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights, the most definitive statement on forced evictions in international law, adopted by the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, has named the practice of forced eviction a prima facie violation of the provision of the Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and “can only be carried out under exceptional circumstances” and then in stringent accordance with principles of international law. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    292261

    Women's safety audits.

    Smaoun S

    Habitat Debate. 2002 Dec; 8(4):[2] p..

    Violence against women, be it threats, intimidation, harassment, sexual attacks or rape, considerably inhibits women’s mobility within the city. Women are targets of violence due to their vulnerability, and this vulnerability perpetuates their position in society. This means that in large cities, most women restrict their movements or activities because they feel unsafe. This daily experience of insecurity makes them infinitely qualified to detect problems and offer solutions. One of the ways in which women can feel safer and fully benefit from the services and resources cities have to offer is to actively go about changing their environment together with municipal authorities and other community institutions and groups. A Women’s Safety Audit is a tool that enables a critical evaluation of the urban environment. This tool was initiated in Canada following the recommendations of a report in 1989 on violence against women and has been further developed by UN-HABITAT’s Safer Cities programme. (excerpt)
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