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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    168660

    Urbanization in Peshawar: making a case for Healthy City Project.

    Khan J

    In: Pakistan's population issues in the 21st century. Conference proceedings Oct 24th - 26th, 2000, Karachi, [compiled by] Population Association of Pakistan. Islamabad, Pakistan, Population Association of Pakistan, 2001. 213-28.

    Acceleration in urban migration is a universal phenomenon. In Pakistan, in general, and Peshawar (the biggest city of North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan), in particular, the urbanization process is taking place at a very rapid pace. Consequently, proper planning is lacking. Being a city in a developing country, the condition of this "city of flowers" has already deteriorated. It was therefore felt that there was a need to highlight this problem and bring it to the notice of all concerned, so that time measures could be taken. In this paper, urbanization problems of Peshawar have been analyzed in the context of emerging global as well as local scenario. An effort has been attempted to present a profile of the problem, to estimate the impact, and recommend strategies to delineate this important public health issue. Indigenous research in this field is seriously lacking in Pakistan. However, published literature, government reports and Internet sources were searched and reviewed. Global view as well as the situation in Pakistan and Peshawar was explored. The impact of urbanization on the population, especially with regard to health was assessed. Finally, recommendations have been put forth for an urgent need for steps to be taken by the government. The recommendations of this study, mainly centering on adoption of healthy city/village concept pledged in the national health policy also, may prove an icebreaker in solving the urbanization-related problems of Peshawar (and other cities of Pakistan as well). This may usher in a new era in raising the health status of the nation in the minimum possible time. (author's)
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  2. 2
    292203

    Water crisis linked to poor governance, says Toepfer.

    Habitat Debate. 2000; 6(3):[4] p..

    Cities concentrate people in high-density settlements creating severe demand for services like water supply and sanitation. It is really a matter of concern that some 95 per cent of the urban population increase over the next 30 years will be in less developed countries. Out of 19 megacities of the world, 15 are in developing countries. Cities are increasingly forced to transport water from longer distances, often beyond natural watersheds and even across national boundaries, as in the case of Johannesburg. In other cases, over-exploitation of groundwater has resulted in major environmental problems. Mexico City, for example, has sunk more than 10 metres in the last 70 years. Thailand is facing irreversible damage to freshwater aquifers from saltwater intrusion, caused by over-abstraction of groundwater. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    292204

    Water for thirsty cities is demand management the solution?

    Ray K

    Habitat Debate. 2000; 6(3):[4] p..

    Africa and Asia are the most rapidly urbanizing regions in the world. The city authorities in these regions are often overwhelmed by this growth and the burgeoning pressure on public services. A recent report of the United Nations Secretary General states that at the current rate of progress, providing safe water to all cannot be anticipated before 2050 in Africa and 2025 in Asia. That is still a generation away! In the meantime, those without access to public supplies — the urban poor — will continue to pay a heavy price for lack of easy access to safe water. Let us take a closer look at the situation in Africa which is the fastest urbanizing continent today. Africa’s urban population will nearly quadruple from 138 million in 1990 to 500 million by 2020. How is it managing its growing urban water demand from the competing industrial, commercial and domestic sectors? The answer is not simple. The task of the city manager is made more complex by the fact that most of the rapidly growing cities are located in water stress or water scarce regions, with diminishing per capita water availability. Several of the larger cities on the continent (Johannesburg, Dakar and Nairobi, for example), have outgrown the capacity of local sources and are forced to carry water from a distance of 200 to 600 kilometres. Others (such as Abidjan, Lusaka and Addis Ababa) are drawing deeper and deeper, often over-abstracting the ground aquifers. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    292222

    Africa's cities may face a dry and dirty future.

    Sen Y

    Habitat Debate. 2002 Jun; 8(2):15-16.

    Water management and pollution are the most critical issues affecting water access today, as affirmed by UN Secretary- General Kofi Annan, during World Water Day, 22 May, 2002, when he stated that, "Even where supplies are plentiful, they are increasingly at risk from pollution and rising demand". The Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), estimates that presently, some 1.1 billion people on earth are without access to clean water and over 2.4 billion are without adequate sanitation. This concern led the organization to launch the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for All (WASH) campaign. UN-HABITAT, which is also involved in this campaign, is increasing its role in urban water issues. It started with the innovative programme, Water for African Cities in seven demonstration cities: Abidjan (Cote d'Ivoire), Accra (Ghana), Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), Dakar (Senegal), Johannesburg (South Africa), Lusaka (Zambia) and Nairobi (Kenya). UN-HABITAT has also recently been mandated by the third World Water Forum to play a leading role in raising international awareness on water and cities. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    292215

    Editorial.

    Habitat Debate. 2001 Jun; 7(2):[2] p..

    At the special session of the General Assembly Istanbul +5, UN Member States adopted by consensus the "Declaration on Cities and Other Human Settlements in the New Millennium", which commits governments to strengthening their efforts to improving the living environment, especially for the urban poor. The governments had met in New York for three days to review progress made in implementing the Habitat Agenda. Five years after the Agenda was adopted, the Istanbul + 5 special session of the General Assembly recognized the gaps and obstacles in the way of developing sustainable human settlements, but also showed the way forward in achieving the Agenda's objectives. By adopting the Declaration, the governments recognized that the world is becoming increasingly urban and that specific policies are needed to address growing urban poverty. Urbanization is clearly a dominant factor in global demographics, raising challenges and opportunities, which in turn have further impact on the numbers. Urbanization has been found to have an impact on fertility, mortality and other demographic trends, on personal and household incomes, and on the general economic development of both rural and urban areas. As UNCHS (Habitat)'s State of the World's Cities Report 2001 clearly indicates, there is a strong correlation between city development and human development at the national level. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    318271

    Growing up urban. UNFPA state of world population 2007. Youth supplement.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2007. [55] p.

    The world is undergoing the largest wave of urban growth in its history. The 3 billion population of towns and cities in 2005 will increase by 1.8 billion by 2030. The urban population of Asia and sub-Saharan Africa will double in less than a generation. The fastest growth will be in the poorer urban areas. For example, the slum population of Dhaka has more than doubled in a decade, from 1.5 million in 1996 to 3.4 million in 2006. Most urban growth comes from natural increase (more births than deaths). The urban poor have higher fertility rates than other urbanites: women have less education and less autonomy; they know little about sexual and reproductive health services, and have little access to them. Rural-urban migration also contributes to urban growth. Young people under 25 already make up half the urban population and young people from poor families will be a big part of the urban wave. The future of cities depends on what cities do now to help them, in particular to exercise their rights to education, health, employment, and civic participation. Investment in young people is the key to ending generations of poverty. In particular it is the key to reaching the Millennium Development Goals and halving poverty by 2015. (excerpt)
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