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Your search found 16 Results

  1. 1
    107443

    Experts and NGOs discuss the implementation of the Dakar / Ngor Declaration and the Cairo Programme of Action in Abidjan.

    AFRICAN POPULATION NEWSLETTER. 1995 Jan-Jun; (67):1.

    An Experts and Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) Workshop on the implementation of the Dakar/Ngor Declaration (DND) and the Cairo Programme of Action (ICPD-PA) was organized in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, June 6-9, 1995 by the Joint ECA/OAU/ADB Secretariat with the financial support of the governments of France and the Netherlands, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), and the African Development Bank. Goals of the Workshop included the following: 1) to evolve a methodology for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of the DND and the ICPD-PA; 2) to define the role of the NGOs in the conceptualization, implementation, and monitoring of policies and programs derived from the DND and the ICPD-PA; 3) to create a network of major NGOs working in the area of population and development in the ECA region; and 4) to define IEC strategies to publicize the recommendations in the DND and the ICPD-PA. 26 experts, and representatives of 28 NGOs, several international and research institutions, UNFPA, and IPPF attended the Workshop. Sessions focused on the following themes: 1) Implementation of the Kilimanjaro Programme of Action at the regional level; 2) National experiences in the implementation of the DND and the ICPD-PA; 3) Framework of monitoring and evaluating the implementation of DND and the ICPD-PA; 4) African Population Commission and the implementation of DND and the ICPD-PA; 5) ADB experience in the field of population programs and projects; and 6) the role of NGOs in the implementation of the DND and the ICPD-PA. The recommendations of the Workshop, which will affect ECA member states, will be disseminated in the second half of 1995.
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  2. 2
    189349

    Preventing HIV / AIDS among adolescents through integrated communication programming.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2003. [117] p.

    This manual is designed to assist national UNFPA officers in planning, designing, implementing and evaluating communication interventions for HIV prevention among adolescents that integrate advocacy, behaviour change communication and education with other policy and service components. The manual provides a series of checklists to guide the programme or project officer in addressing key questions related evidenced-based communication programming for HIV prevention among adolescents. The checklists follow a stepwise decision-making process and serve as menus of options to conduct thorough needs assessments, analyse programmatic responses, and handle strategic programming decisions. The first chapter sets the tone in relation to UNFPA’s support at the county level. It describes the three main communication approaches, HIV prevention, adolescent reproductive health, and explains how they relate to the UNFPA programming cycle. The second and third chapters review the situation of HIV among adolescents from the viewpoint of their priority needs and government policies and intended response. Beneficiary needs and state policies become the set of priority issues that communication will need to address. The fourth chapter assesses the ability of organizations involved in HIV prevention among youths to identify needs for capacity development and to help UNFPA determine its role vis-à-vis implementing partners. The fifth chapter compiles a set of desirable programme results in advocacy, behaviour change communication and education that focus on HIV prevention among young people. It also provides tips for selecting among them. The sixth chapter provides information and suggestions for selecting the communication strategy that will be most effective, based on assessed adolescent communication and health needs. The seventh chapter reviews issues to strengthen partnerships, management and coordination in programme implementation. Chapter eight provides tips and tools for monitoring and evaluating processes and outcomes. (author's)
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  3. 3
    278445

    Indicators for monitoring the Millennium Development Goals: definitions, rationale, concepts and sources.

    United Nations Development Group

    New York, New York, United Nations, 2003 Oct. [111] p.

    This handbook contains basic metadata on the agreed list of quantitative indicators for monitoring progress towards the 8 goals and 18 targets derived from the Millennium Declaration. The list of indicators, developed using several criteria, is not intended to be prescriptive but to take into account the country setting and the views of various stakeholders in preparing country-level reports. Five main criteria guided the selection of indicators. They should: Provide relevant and robust measures of progress towards the targets of the Millennium Development Goals. Be clear and straightforward to interpret and provide a basis for international comparison. Be broadly consistent with other global lists and avoid imposing an unnecessary burden on country teams, governments and other partners. Be based to the greatest extent possible on international standards, recommendations and best practices. Be constructed from well-established data sources, be quantifiable and be consistent to enable measurement over time. The handbook is designed to provide the United Nations country teams and national and international stakeholders with guidance on the definitions, rationale, concepts and sources of the data for the indicators that are being used to monitor the Millennium Development Goals. Just as the indicator list is dynamic and will necessarily evolve in response to changing national situations, so will the metadata change over time as concepts, definitions and methodologies change. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    286826

    Reproductive health in Iraq in need of rehabilitation.

    Population 2005. 2003 Dec; 5(4):9.

    A survey conducted by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), in collaboration with the International Center for Migration and Health, has tracked startling statistics regarding the health system in Iraq. According to UNFPA, the number of women who die from pregnancy and childbirth in Iraq has close to tripled since 1990. Among the causes of the reported 310 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2002 are bleeding, ectopic pregnancies and prolonged labor. In addition, stress and exposure to chemical contaminants are also partly to blame for the rise in miscarriages among Iraqi women. Access to medical facilities is becoming more difficult for women due to breakdowns in security and weakened communication and transport systems. This has caused nearly 65 per cent of Iraqi women to give birth at home, the majority without skilled help. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    296466

    Commission gives high priority to monitoring global trends - UN Population Commission meeting, Mar 28-31, 1994 - includes information on preparation of action program to be recommended at the Sep 5-13, 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, Egypt.

    UN Chronicle. 1994 Jun; 31(2):[3] p..

    The effect of population growth on the environment, the role and status of women, and the demographic implications of development Policies were among major topics discussed by the Population Commission at its twenty-seventh session (28-31 March, New York). "The most important lesson we have learned is that population growth and other demographic trends can only be affected by investing in people and by promoting equality between women and men", Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) and Secretary-General of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, told the 26-member body. In the single text approved during the session, for adoption by the Economic and Social Council, the Commission asked that high priority be given to monitoring world population trends and policies, and to strengthening multilateral technical cooperation to address population concerns. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    300895
    Peer Reviewed

    Can the process indicators for emergency obstetric care assess the progress of maternal mortality reduction programs? An examination of UNFPA Projects 2000-2004. [Les indicateurs de processus pour les soins obstétriques d’urgence peuvent-ils évaluer les progrès des programmes de réduction de la mortalité maternelle ? Un examen des projets du FNUAP 2000-2004]

    Fauveau V; Donnay F

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2006 Jun; 93(3):308-316.

    In view of the disappointing progress made in the last 20 years in reducing maternal mortality in low-income countries and before going to scale in implementing the new evidence-based strategies, it is crucial to review and assess the progress made in pilot countries where maternal mortality reduction programs focused on emergency obstetric care. The objective was to review the process indicators recommended for monitoring emergency obstetric care and their application in field situations, examining the conditions under which they can be used to assess the progress of maternal mortality reduction programs. Five of the six UN recommended process indicators were monitored annually for 5 years in selected districts of Morocco, Mozambique, India and Nicaragua. Trends are presented and discussed. With specific variations due to different local situations in the four countries and in spite of variations in quality of data collection, all indicators showed a consistent positive trend, in response to the inputs of the programs. The UN process indicators for emergency obstetric care should continue to be promoted, but with two important conditions: (1) data collection is carefully checked for quality and coverage; (2) efforts are made to match process and outcome indicators (maternal and perinatal mortality, incidence of complications). (author's)
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  7. 7
    320243

    Joint UNFPA-UNICEF-WHO Meeting on Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections in the Pacific, 8-11 November 2005, Nadi, Fiji.

    UNICEF Pacific; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Office for the Pacific; World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines. WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, [2006]. [35] p. ((WP)HSI/ICP/HSI/3.5/001; Report Series No. RS/2005/GE/36(FIJ))

    The Joint UNFPA-UNICEF-WHO Meeting on Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections in the Pacific was held at the Mocambo Hotel in Nadi, Fiji, from 8 to 11 November 2005 with the following objectives: to review the current sexually transmitted infection (STI) situation in the Pacific island countries and areas; to share experiences, lessons learnt and the latest developments in STI prevention and control; and to identify issues, gaps and key actions needed for effective prevention and control of STI in the Pacific island countries and areas. The programme included technical presentations, situation reports from countries and partners and open forum discussion across a broad range of issues related to the epidemiology, prevention and control of STIs: the status of STIs in countries in the Pacific region; new STI case management strategies; the role of laboratories in STI case management, screening and surveillance systems; special needs for dealing with STIs in high-risk groups like antenatal women, sex workers and their clients, and youth; the integration of STIs into reproductive health services; and Pacific STI networking, both current and planned. Meeting participants reached a number of conclusions and made recommendations. These included: recognition of the important individual and public health hazards that STIs present in the Pacific region; the special clinical and epidemiological challenges that are presented by chlamydiosis; the utility of syndromic case management in controlling STIs, the importance of STI intervention programmes targeting "core" and "bridging" groups; and the role of partnerships and STI networks in the Pacific region. Each participating country identified its immediate priority needs as well as priorities for regional support. (author's)
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  8. 8
    321122

    Engaging faith-based organizations in HIV prevention. A training manual for programme managers.

    Toure A; Melek M; Jato M; Kane M; Kajungu R

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2007. [53] p.

    The influence behind faith-based organizations is not difficult to discern. In many developing countries, FBOs not only provide spiritual guidance to their followers; they are often the primary providers for a variety of local health and social services. Situated within communities and building on relationships of trust, these organizations have the ability to influence the attitudes and behaviours of their fellow community members. Moreover, they are in close and regular contact with all age groups in society and their word is respected. In fact, in some traditional communities, religious leaders are often more influential than local government officials or secular community leaders. Many of the case studies researched for the UNFPA publication Culture Matters showed that the involvement of faith-based organizations in UNFPA-supported projects enhanced negotiations with governments and civil society on culturally sensitive issues. Gradually, these experiences are being shared across countries andacross regions, which has facilitated interfaith dialogue on the most effective approaches to prevent the spread of HIV. Such dialogue has also helped convince various faith-based organizations that joining together as a united front is the most effective way to fight the spread of HIV and lessen the impact of AIDS. This manual is a capacity-building tool to help policy makers and programmers identify, design and follow up on HIV prevention programmes undertaken by FBOs. The manual can also be used by development practitioners partnering with FBOs to increase their understanding of the role of FBOs in HIV prevention, and to design plans for partnering with FBOs to halt the spread of the virus. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    331902

    From inception to large scale: the Geracao Biz Programme in Mozambique.

    Hainsworth G; Zilhao I; Badiani R; Gregorio D; Jamisse L

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization, [WHO], 2009. 48 p. (Analytic Case Studies. Initiatives to Increase the Use of Health Services by Adolescents)

    This case study describes how the Government of Mozambique scaled up its successful youth HIV prevention and sexual and reproductive health program to a national level. Geared toward developing-country governments and nongovernmental organizations, the case study provides a technical overview of the program and its interventions, a detailed description of the scale-up process and lessons learned, and the program's achievements.
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  10. 10
    332015

    The Fistula Fortnight: Healing Wounds, Renewing Hope, 21 February - 6 March 2005, Kano, Katsina, Kebbi and Sokoto States, Nigeria.

    Iliyasu Z; Idoko L; Ramsey K

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], [2007]. 46 p.

    The Fistula Fortnight accomplished a number of goals: it mobilized resources for obstetric fistula and safe motherhood; increased public awareness that fistula is preventable; contributed to combating the marginalization of women who suffer from fistula; strengthened institutional capacity to manage fistula; and began to address the broader needs of women living with the disability. While the surgeries conducted represent only a small portion of the backlog, the Fistula Fortnight provided a strategic opportunity to raise awareness and motivate action among policymakers, national and local leaders, and the general public about the need to increase efforts to both prevent and treat fistula. (Excerpt)
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  11. 11
    333218

    Making reproductive rights and sexual and reproductive health a reality for all. Reproductive rights and sexual and reproductive health framework.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2008 May. [40] p.

    The Reproductive rights and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) framework has been developed to provide overall guidance and a cohesive- Fund-wide response for implementing the Reproductive Health and Rights elements of the UNFPA Strategic plan 2008-2011. The framework builds on the goals of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), 1994; the Millennium Summit, 2000, with its adoption of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); the 2005 World Summit; and the addition, in 2007, of the goal of universal access to reproductive health to MDG 5, for improving maternal health. This includes two parts: the first provides a snapshot of the progress achieved since ICPD, identifies major remaining gaps and priorities and outlines principles and approaches for programme planning and implementation. The second part identifies key priorities and specific strategies for each of the SRH-related strategic plan outcomes. (Excerpt)
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  12. 12
    351766
    Peer Reviewed

    Ensuring the complementarity of country ownership and accountability for results in relation to donor aid: a response.

    Germain A

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2011 Nov; 19(38):141-5.

    This paper focuses on the topic of improving the impact of sexual and reproductive health development assistance from European donors. It touches on country ownership and accountability and uses International Health Partnership+ (IHP+) as an example. In addition, it discusses the need for better funding data and more activity around sexual and reproductive health and rights. It concludes with recommendations for improving aid impact and effectiveness and improving outcome measures.
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  13. 13
    357499
    Peer Reviewed

    Maternal & Newborn Health Road Maps: a review of progress in 33 sub-Saharan African countries, 2008-2009.

    Ekechi C; Wolman Y; de Bernis L

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2012 Jun; 20(39):164-8.

    The 2006 Maputo Plan of Action aimed to help African nations to achieve the Millennium Development Goals related to reducing maternal mortality, combatting HIV and AIDS, and reducing infant and child mortality within integrated sexual and reproductive health care plans. In 2008 and 2009, UNFPA worked with senior Ministry of Health officials and national UNFPA, UNICEF and WHO teams in 33 African countries to review their development of national Maternal and Newborn Health strategies and plans through a self-assessment survey. The survey showed that many key components were missing, in particular there was poor integration of family planning; lack of budgetary, infrastructure and human resources plans; and weak monitoring and evaluation provisions. The maternal and newborn health Road Map initiative has been the single most important factor for the initiation and development of the national maternal and newborn health plans for many African countries. However the deficiencies within these national plans need to be addressed before a significant reduction in maternal and newborn mortality can realistically be achieved. Copyright (c) 2012 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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  14. 14
    335183

    Key performance indicators strengthen procurement in Latin America.

    John Snow [JSI]. DELIVER

    Arlington, Virginia, JSI, DELIVER, 2013 Jan. [7] p.

    This brief describes the evolution of contraceptive procurement in the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region, highlighting how LAC countries monitored and evaluated key data when making performance improvements. By introducing and monitoring key indicators, they were able to smooth the procurement process and improve procurement performance.
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  15. 15
    375726

    Accelerating change by the numbers. 2016 annual report of the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting: Accelerating change.

    UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2017 Jul. 92 p.

    The 2016 Annual Report for the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting provides two perspectives. This main document, "By the Numbers," analyses progress in quantitative terms, using the Results Framework as a basis. It provides an account of how the budget was allocated and offers profiles of each of the 17 programme countries (excepting Yemen). The profiles present facts on the national context, summarize key achievements, and share operational and financial information.
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  16. 16
    374583

    The evaluation of comprehensive sexuality education programmes: a focus on the gender and empowerment outcomes.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2015. 64 p.

    Repeated evaluations have demonstrated that comprehensive sexuality education does not foster earlier sexual debut or unsafe sexual activity. By contrast, programmes that teach only abstinence have not proved to be effective. Additionally, recent research demonstrates that gender norms are a “gateway factor” for a range of adolescent health outcomes. Comprehensive sexuality education curricula that emphasize critical thinking about gender and power – the empowerment approach – are far more effective than conventional “gender-blind” programmes at reducing rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended early pregnancy. These studies also indicate that young people who adopt more egalitarian attitudes about gender roles, compared to their peers, are more likely to delay sexual debut, use condoms and practise contraception. They are also less likely to be in relationships characterized by violence. This report, The Evaluation of Comprehensive Sexuality Education Programmes: A Focus on the Gender and Empowerment Outcomes, represents an important milestone in our understanding of advances in the field of comprehensive sexuality education evaluation. It offers an extensive review and analysis of a wide range of evaluation studies of different comprehensive sexuality education programmes, at different stages of development and from different contexts and setting across the globe. It enriches our knowledge of new methodologies, available questionnaires and instruments that can be applied in future assessments and evaluations, most particularly to measure the gender empowerment outcome of comprehensive sexuality education programmes. It addresses the adaptation of the methodology to various contexts and age-specific groups of young people and children. This report is co-sponsored by UNFPA, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the World Health Organization and the International Planned Parenthood Federation.
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