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Your search found 21 Results

  1. 1
    105579

    Visit to WHO / GPV to discuss introduction of vaccine vial monitors, March 20-24, 1995.

    Fields R

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, 1995. [3], 10, [14] p. (BASICS Trip Report; BASICS Technical Directive: 000 HT 51 012; USAID Contract No. HRN-6006-C-00-3031-00)

    In March 1995, a BASICS (Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival) Project technical officer participated in a World Health Organization (WHO) Global Programme on Vaccines and Immunization (GPV) meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, about introduction of vaccine vial monitors (VVMs). VVMs constitute color-coded labels that can be affixed to vials of vaccines which, when exposed to heat over time, change irreversibly. In 1994, WHO and UNICEF requested that, starting in January 1996, VVMs be affixed on all UNICEF-purchased vials of oral polio vaccine. Yet, UNICEF does not require vaccine manufacturers to include VVMs in their vaccine labels. USAID has supported much of the development and field testing of VVMs since 1987. Participants discussed status of interactions between UNICEF and vaccine manufacturers, issues and means related to introducing VVMs worldwide, and the prospect for conducting a study or studies on the initial effect of VVMs on vaccine-handling practices. They also heard an update on the pilot introduction of VVMs in some countries. BASICS could contribute to the development of a plan for global VVM introduction, since time constraints and heavy workloads face WHO/GPV leaders. UNICEF and GPV staff suggested that other VVM products from different manufacturers also be sold to avoid a monopoly. Participants considered issues of global introduction and resolution of issues with manufacturers of VVMs and vaccines to be high priority issues. WHO and UNICEF asked BASICS to draft general training materials for staff at the central, provincial, district, and periphery levels, focusing on actions that each level should take as a result of VVM use. They also asked BASICS to develop a quick-reference sheet for policy makers.
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  2. 2
    182169
    Peer Reviewed

    Reducing child mortality: Can public health deliver?

    Bryce J; el Arifeen S; Pariyo G; Lanata CF; Gwatkin D

    Lancet. 2003 Jul 12; 362(9378):159-164.

    This is the third paper in the series on child survival. The second paper in the series, published last week, concluded that in the 42 countries with 90% of child deaths worldwide in 2000, 63% of these deaths could have been prevented through full implementation of a few known and effective interventions. Levels of coverage with these interventions are still unacceptably low in most low-income and middle-income countries. Worse still, coverage for some interventions, such as immunisations and attended delivery, are stagnant or even falling in several of the poorest countries. This paper highlights the importance of separating biological or behavioural interventions from the delivery systems required to put them in place, and the need to tailor delivery strategies to the stage of health-system development. We review recent initiatives in child health and discuss essential aspects of delivery systems, including: need for data at the subnational level to support health planning; regular monitoring of provision and use of health services, and of intervention coverage; and the need to achieve high and equitable coverage with selected interventions. Community-based initiatives can extend the delivery of interventions in areas where health services are hard to access, but strengthening national health systems should be the long-term aim. The millennium development goal for child survival can be achieved, but only if strategies for delivery interventions are greatly improved and scaled-up. (author's)
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  3. 3
    182215
    Peer Reviewed

    Poverty, equity, human rights and health. [Pauvreté, équité, droits de l'Homme et santé]

    Braveman P; Gruskin S

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2003 Jul; 81(7):539-545.

    Those concerned with poverty and health have sometimes viewed equity and human rights as abstract concepts with little practical application, and links between health, equity and human rights have not been examined systematically. Examination of the concepts of poverty, equity, and human rights in relation to health and to each other demonstrates that they are closely linked conceptually and operationally and that each provides valuable, unique guidance for health institutions’ work. Equity and human rights perspectives can contribute concretely to health institutions’ efforts to tackle poverty and health, and focusing on poverty is essential to operationalizing those commitments. Both equity and human rights principles dictate the necessity to strive for equal opportunity for health for groups of people who have suffered marginalization or discrimination. Health institutions can deal with poverty and health within a framework encompassing equity and human rights concerns in five general ways: (1) institutionalizing the systematic and routine application of equity and human rights perspectives to all health sector actions; (2) strengthening and extending the public health functions, other than health care, that create the conditions necessary for health; (3) implementing equitable health care financing, which should help reduce poverty while increasing access for the poor; (4) ensuring that health services respond effectively to the major causes of preventable ill-health among the poor and disadvantaged; and (5) monitoring, advocating and taking action to address the potential health equity and human rights implications of policies in all sectors affecting health, not only the health sector. (author's)
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  4. 4
    287950
    Peer Reviewed

    Surveillance of drug resistance in tuberculosis in the state of Tamil Nadu.

    Paramasivan CN; Bhaskarair K; Venkataraman P; Chandrasekaran V; Narayanan PR

    Indian Journal of Tuberculosis. 2000; 47(1):27-33.

    Surveillance of drug resistance was carried out at State level to obtain data which are standardised and compaiable using guidelines prescribed by the WHO/IUATLD Working Group on Anti-tuberculosis Drug Resistance Surveillance. The objective was to determine the proportion of initial and acquired drug resistance in cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in Tamil Nadu, m order to use the level of drug resistance as a performance indicator of the National Tuberculosis Programme. Two specimens of sputum from each of a total of 713 patients attending 145 participating centres all over the state were tested by smear and culture examination and drug susceptibility tests of Isoniazid, Rifampicin, Ethambutol and Streptomycin. Out of 400 patients for whom drug susceptibility results were available, 384 (96%) had no history of previous anti-tuberculosis treatment. Of these, 312 (81%) were susceptible to all the drugs tested. Resistance to Isoniazid was seen in 15.4% of patients and to Rifampicin in 4.4%, including resistance to Isoniazid and Rifampicin in 3.4%. There has been a gradual increase in initial drug resistance over the years in this part of the country. (author's)
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  5. 5
    290366

    Interim WHO clinical staging of HIV / AIDS and HIV / AIDS case definitions for surveillance. African region.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2005. [46] p. (WHO/HIV/2005.02)

    With a view to facilitating the scale-up of access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the African Region the present document outlines recent revisions made by WHO to the clinical staging of HIV/AIDS and to case definitions for HIV/AIDS disease surveillance. These interim guidelines are based on an international drafting meeting held in Saas Fee in June 2004 and on recommendations made by experts from African countries at a meeting held in Nairobi in December of the same year. The revisions to the clinical staging target professionals ranging from senior consultants in teaching and referral hospitals to surveillance officers and first-level health care providers, all of whom have important roles in caring for people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA), including children. It is proposed that countries review, adapt and repackage the guidelines as appropriate for specific tasks at different levels of health service delivery. It is hoped that national HIV/ AIDS programmes in African countries will thus be assisted to develop, revise or strengthen their ART guidelines, patient monitoring and surveillance efforts. The interim clinical staging and revised definitions for surveillance are currently being reviewed in the other WHO regions and will be finalized at a global meeting to be held in September 2005. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    299727

    Monitoring the Declaration of Commitment on HIV / AIDS: guidelines on construction of core indicators.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2005 Jul. 106 p. (UNAIDS/05.17E)

    The primary purpose of this document is to provide key constituents, who are actively involved in an individual country's response to HIV and AIDS, with essential information on core indicators that measure the effectiveness of the national response. These guidelines will also help ensure the transparency of the process used by national governments and UNAIDS to prepare progress reports on implementation of the UNGASS Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS. Countries are strongly encouraged to integrate the core indicators into their ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities. These indicators are designed to help countries assess the current state of their national response while simultaneously contributing to a better understanding of the global response to the AIDS pandemic, including progress towards meeting the Declaration of Commitment targets. Given the parallel applications of the indicators, the guidelines in this document are designed to improve the quality and consistency of data collected at country level, which will enhance the accuracy of conclusions drawn from the data at both regional and global levels. This document also includes an overview of global indicators that will be used by UNAIDS and its partners to assess key components of the response that are best measured on a worldwide basis. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    300755

    HIV / AIDS, law and human rights: a handbook for Russian legislators.

    Narkevich MI; Polubinskaya SV

    Moscow, Russia, Transatlantic Partners Against AIDS, 2005. 52 p.

    The purpose of this Handbook is to assist members of the Federation Council and deputies of the State Duma of the Russian Federation, and other Russian officials on the federal and regional levels, in enacting appropriate legislation and legislative reform to address AIDS, whether they be initiatives prohibiting discrimination against PLWHA or members of highly vulnerable groups, laws guaranteeing reliable HIV prevention information for all Russian citizens, or other policy priorities — and ensuring adequate fiscal and other resources to support them. This Handbook provides examples of the best legislative and regulatory practices gathered from around the world. Best practices are given for each of the 12 guidelines contained in the International Guidelines on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights, published in 1998 by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (UNHCHR) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). The Handbook also presents detailed information on the Russian AIDS epidemic with regard to the establishment and implementation of these Guidelines. Most importantly, the Handbook outlines concrete recommendations on measures that legislators can take to protect human rights and promote public health in responding to the epidemic. (author's)
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  8. 8
    311833
    Peer Reviewed

    Rationale for developing a new international growth reference.

    Garza C; de Onis M

    Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 2004; 25 Suppl 1:S5-S14.

    The rationale for developing a new international growth reference derived principally from a Working Group on infant growth established by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1990. It recommended an approach that described how children should grow rather than describing how children grow; that an international sampling frame be used to highlight the similarity in early childhood growth among diverse ethnic groups; that modern analytical methods be exploited; and that links among anthropometric assessments and functional outcomes be included to the fullest possible extent. Upgrading international growth references to resemble standards more closely will assist in monitoring and attaining a wide variety of international goals related to health and other aspects of social equity. In addition to providing scientifically robust tools, a new reference based on a global sample of children whose health needs are met will provide a useful advocacy tool to health-care providers and others with interests in promoting child health. (author's)
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  9. 9
    311687

    Fulfilling reproductive rights for women affected by HIV / AIDS. A tool for monitoring progress toward three Millennium Development Goals. Updated version.

    de Bruyn M

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Ipas, 2006 Aug. 20 p.

    In 2004, more than 25 national and international organizations presented a statement to the secretariat of the United Nations (UN) Commission on the Status of Women that highlighted relatively neglected areas in the reproductive health of women affected by HIV/AIDS. In collaboration with the International Community of Women Living with HIV/AIDS (ICW), the Center for Health and Gender Equity (CHANGE) and the Pacific Institute for Women's Health, Ipas used that statement and a literature review to develop this practical tool to help nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) address those neglected areas of reproductive health. Since the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have become a common framework for assessing progress in development, the tool links those areas of reproductive health to three of the MDGs related to empowering women, improving maternal health and combating HIV/AIDS. This document is an updated version of the original resource published in 2004. Changes were made after the eight partner NGOs listed below piloted the benchmarks in 11 developing countries. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    318821
    Peer Reviewed

    New guidance issued on HIV data collection.

    Hargreaves S

    Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2007 Aug; 7(8):508.

    New guidance has been issued to ensure that patient confidentiality is not compromised in the process of collecting and storing information on HIV/AIDS. "Ensuring that HIV information is securely stored and confidentiality is maintained will avoid potential stigmatisation and discrimination of individuals and communities as countries are scaling up HIV prevention, treatment, care, and support services", Eduard Beck (UNAIDS, Geneva, Switzerland) told TLID. "The development of these guidelines is part of the standards work that UNAIDS has been involved in, together with the US-funded President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and WHO...it is aimed at those who provide and use HIV services, and managers who need to monitor and evaluate the services provided." (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    319155
    Peer Reviewed

    IAP Guidelines 2006 on hospital based management of severely malnourished children (adapted from the WHO guidelines).

    Bhatnagar S; Lodha R; Choudhury P; Sachdev HP; Shah N

    Indian Pediatrics. 2007 Jun 17; 44(6):443-461.

    Malnutrition in children is widely prevalent in India. It is estimated that 57 million children are underweight (moderate and severe). More than 50% of deaths in 0-4 years are associated with malnutrition. The median case fatality rate is approximately 23.5% in severe malnutrition, reaching 50% in edematous malnutrition. There is a need for standardized protocol-based management to improve the outcome of severely malnourished children. In 2006, Indian Academy of Pediatrics undertook the task of developing guidelines for the management of severely malnourished children based on adaptation from the WHO guidelines. We summarize below the revised consensus recommendations (and wherever relevant the rationale) of the group. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    321121

    UNAIDS practical guidelines for intensifying HIV prevention: Towards universal access.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007. [66] p. (UNAIDS/07.07E; JC1274E)

    These Practical Guidelines for Intensifying HIV Prevention: Towards Universal Access are designed to provide policy makers and planners with practical guidance to tailor their national HIV prevention response so that they respond to the epidemic dynamics and social context of the country and populations who remain most vulnerable to and at risk of HIV infection. They have been developed in consultation with the UNAIDS cosponsors, international collaborating partners, government, civil society leaders and other experts. They build on Intensifying HIV Prevention: UNAIDS Policy Position Paper and the UNAIDS Action Plan on Intensifying HIV Prevention. In 2006, governments committed themselves to scaling up HIV prevention and treatment responses to ensure universal access by 2010. While in the past five years treatment access has expanded rapidly, the number of new HIV infections has not decreased - estimated at 4.3 (3.6-6.6) million in 2006 - with many people unable to access prevention services to prevent HIV infection. These Guidelines recognize that to sustain the advances in antiretroviral treatment and to ensure true universal access requires that prevention services be scaled up simultaneously with treatment. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    353472

    Practical guidelines for supporting EDUCAIDS implementation.

    Greenall M

    Paris, France, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization [UNESCO], 2012. 158 p.

    The education sector has a significant role to play in the response to HIV and AIDS. The sector can help to prevent the spread of HIV through education, and, in countries that are highly affected by HIV, by taking steps to protect itself from the effects of the epidemic. It can also make a significant contribution by supporting health improvement more generally and by helping to improve the sexual and reproductive health of young people in particular.This framework is designed to help those working in the education sector at a national level to understand the need for a robust response to HIV and AIDS in order to achieve Education for All (EFA) and the education-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The document also highlights the education sector’s role in contributing to universal access to HIV and AIDS prevention, treatment, care and support.
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  14. 14
    335040

    Country implementation of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes: status report 2011.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2013. [62] p.

    Globally, breastfeeding has the potential to prevent 220 000 deaths among children under five each year. WHO recommends that all infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life, but actual practice is low (38%). The implementation and enforcement of International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes and subsequent relevant Health Assembly Resolutions (the Code) are critical for an environment that supports proper infant and young child feeding and for the attainment of Millennium Development Goal 4 (reduce child mortality). This report summarizes the progress countries have made in implementing the Code. It is based on data received from WHO Member States between 2008 and 2010 and on information for 2011 from UNICEF. WHO recognizes ongoing progress being made in various countries since 2011, in terms of passing laws, strengthening existing laws or improving monitoring mechanisms. Updates will be included on an ongoing basis in the WHO Global database on the Implementation of Nutrition Action (GINA). In addition, WHO will publish status reports periodically.
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  15. 15
    335271

    Monitoring national cervical cancer prevention and control programmes: quality control and quality assurance for visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA)-based programmes.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2013. [41] p.

    This guide outlines quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) considerations to support introduction or scale-up of visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) as a screening test for cervical cancer, within the context of national comprehensive cervical cancer prevention and control programmes. The guide proposes a framework for QC and QA including a core set of indicators, and provides examples for how the indicators can be set, measured and used to strengthen programme implementation. The guide is intended primarily for programme managers, supervisors and other stakeholders working in public health programmes for cervical cancer prevention and control.
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  16. 16
    378061
    Peer Reviewed

    Elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis in Cuba and Thailand.

    Ishikawa N; Newman L; Taylor M; Essajee S; Pendse R

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2016 Nov; 94(11):787-787A.

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  17. 17
    375609

    WHO guidelines on ethical issues in public health surveillance.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 56 p.

    The WHO Guidelines on Ethical Issues in Public Health Surveillance is the first international framework of its kind, it fills an important gap. The goal of the guideline development project was to help policymakers and practitioners navigate the ethical issues presented by public health surveillance. This document outlines 17 ethical guidelines that can assist everyone involved in public health surveillance, including officials in government agencies, health workers, NGOs and the private sector. Surveillance, when conducted ethically, is the foundation for programs to promote human well-being at the population level. It can contribute to reducing inequalities: pockets of suffering that are unfair, unjust and preventable cannot be addressed if they are not first made visible. But surveillance is not without risks for participants and sometimes poses ethical dilemmas. Issues about privacy, autonomy, equity, and the common good need to be considered and balanced, and knowing how to do so can be challenging in practice.
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  18. 18
    323639

    Programme reporting standards for sexual, reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 32 p.

    Information about design, context, implementation, monitoring and evaluation is central to understanding the processes and impacts of sexual, reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health (SRMNCAH) programmes, in support of effective replication and scale-up of these efforts. Existing reporting guidelines do not demand sufficient detail in the reporting of contextual and implementation issues. We have, therefore, developed programme reporting standards (PRS) to provide guidance for complete and accurate reporting on the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation processes of SRMNCAH programmes. The PRS can be used by SRMNCAH programme implementers and researchers. The PRS can be used prospectively to guide the reporting of a programme throughout its life cycle, or retrospectively to describe what was done, when, where, how and by whom. The PRS is intended as a guide for implementation researchers who need to document important details of implementation and context in addition to the results of their studies. The PRS is intended for programme managers and other staff or practitioners who have designed, implemented and/or evaluated SRMNCAH programmes. It can be used by governmental and nongovernmental organizations, bilateral and multilateral agencies, as well as by the private sector. The PRS is also intended as a guide for implementation researchers who need to document important details of implementation and context in addition to the results of their studies
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  19. 19
    323933

    Monitoring human rights in contraceptive services and programmes.

    Gruskin S; Kumar S; Nicholson A; Ali M; Khosla R

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 73 p.

    This tool for Monitoring human rights in contraceptive services and programmes contributes to the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) ongoing work on rights-based contraceptive programmes. This work builds directly on WHO’s 2014 Ensuring human rights within contraceptive programmes: a human rights analysis of existing quantitative indicators and the 2015 publication Ensuring human rights within contraceptive service delivery implementation guide by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and WHO. This tool is intended for use by countries to assist them in strengthening their human rights efforts in contraceptive programming. The tool uses existing commonly-used indicators to highlight areas where human rights have been promoted, neglected or violated in contraceptive programming; gaps in programming and in data collection; and opportunities for action within the health sector and beyond, including opportunities for partnership initiatives.
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  20. 20
    375764

    Global guidance on criteria and processes for validation: Elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis. Second edition.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland,WHO, 2017. 52 p.

    This second edition of the EMTCT global validation guidance document provides standardized processes and consensus-developed criteria to validate EMTCT of HIV and syphilis, and to recognize high-HIV burden countries that have made significant progress on the path to elimination. The guidance places strong emphasis on country-led accountability, rigorous analysis, intensive programme assessment and multilevel collaboration, including the involvement of communities of women living with HIV. It provides guidance to evaluate the country’s EMTCT programme, the quality and accuracy of its laboratory and data collection mechanisms, as well as its efforts to uphold human rights and equality of women living with HIV, and their involvement in decision-making processes.
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  21. 21
    392520
    Peer Reviewed

    A Decade of Monitoring HIV Epidemics in Nigeria: Positioning for Post-2015 Agenda.

    Akinwande O; Bashorun A; Azeez A; Agbo F; Dakum P; Abimiku A; Bilali C; Idoko J; Ogungbemi K

    AIDS and Behavior. 2017 Jul; 21(Suppl 1):62-71.

    BACKGROUND: Nigeria accounts for 9% of the global HIV burden and is a signatory to Millennium Development Goals as well as the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals. This paper reviews maturation of her HIV M&E system and preparedness for monitoring of the post-2015 agenda. METHODS: Using the UNAIDS criteria for assessing a functional M&E system, a mixed-methods approach of desk review and expert consultations, was employed. RESULTS: Following adoption of a multi-sectoral M&E system, Nigeria experienced improved HIV coordination at the National and State levels, capacity building for epidemic appraisals, spectrum estimation and routine data quality assessments. National data and systems audit processes were instituted which informed harmonization of tools and indicators. The M&E achievements of the HIV response enhanced performance of the National Health Management Information System (NHMIS) using DHIS2 platform following its re-introduction by the Federal Ministry of Health, and also enabled decentralization of data management to the periphery. CONCLUSION: A decade of implementing National HIV M&E framework in Nigeria and the recent adoption of the DHIS2 provides a strong base for monitoring the Post 2015 agenda. There is however a need to strengthen inter-sectoral data linkages and reduce the rising burden of data collection at the global level.
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