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  1. 1
    275761

    National spending for AIDS 2004. Prepublication draft.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]. Global Resource Tracking Consortium for AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2004 Jul. [82] p.

    In monitoring resource flows for HIV and AIDS, it has proven easier to collect information on donor governments, multilateral agencies, foundations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) than to obtain reliable budget information on domestic outlays for HIV and AIDS in affected countries. As a result, UNAIDS has focused significant efforts on strengthening the capacity of countries to monitor and track expenditures for HIV and AIDS. This report summarizes the latest information available on HIV-related spending in 26 countries. Seventeen of the countries are from the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region. Resource tracking in the LAC region, as well as in Thailand, Burkina Faso and Ghana has benefited from the leadership of the Regional AIDS Initiative for Latin America and the Caribbean (SIDALAC), which helped implement the National AIDS Account (NAA) approach. Beginning with pilot projects in three countries in 1997–1998, NAA has now been extended throughout the region, in large part due to the provision of extensive technical assistance by countries involved in the early pilot projects. NAA uses a matrix system that describes the level and flow of health expenditures on AIDS. The NAA model: a) identifies key actors in HIV and AIDS activities; b) uses existing data or makes estimates for specific services or goods purchased; c) analyses domestic (public and private) and international budgets; d) determines out-of-pocket expenditures; and e) assesses the financial dimensions of the country’s response to AIDS. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    281203

    The Glion Call to Action on Family Planning and HIV / AIDS in Women and Children, 3-5 May 2004.

    Glion Call to Action on Family Planning and HIV / AIDS in Women and Children (2004)

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2004. 6 p.

    In order to achieve internationally agreed development goals, it is vital that the linkages between reproductive health and HIV/AIDS prevention and care be addressed. To date, the benefits of the linkages have not been fully realized. United Nations agencies have initiated consultations with a wide range of stakeholders to identify opportunities for strengthening potential synergies between reproductive health and HIV/AIDS efforts. This Glion Call to Action reflects the consensus of one such consultation, which focused on the linkage between family planning (a key component of reproductive health) and prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) (a key component of HIV/AIDS programmes). The focus of the Glion Call to Action on preventing HIV among women and children is fully consistent with the parallel need for increased commitment to the health and wellbeing of women themselves. Therefore, the Glion Call to Action rests on the consensus achieved at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo and acknowledges the rights of women to decide freely on matters related to their sexuality, including sexual and reproductive health, free of coercion, discrimination and violence, and the need to improve access to services so that couples and individuals can decide freely the number, spacing and timing of their children. In order to ensure that these rights are respected, policies, programmes and interventions must promote gender equality, and give priority to the poor and underserved populations. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    284056

    IAEN: Current Issues in the Economics of HIV / AIDS. Prospects for support and development of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of HIV / AIDS assistance programs, Thursday, April 24, 2003. Transcript.

    International AIDS Economics Network [IAEN]

    [Palo Alto, California], Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2003. 50 p.

    Each of us who works in this field and who visits countries where HIV/AIDS is devastating society has their own tragic memories of people that we have met, of communities that we have visited, of parents, dying parents of children affected by HIV/AIDS, so I can't think of anything more important than this discussion on effective strategies for resource mobilization and resource allocation. This is and area that we are giving much greater attention at USAIDS as we have access to greater resources. We are now doing a specific strategic plan for each country, and of course those plans very much involve our relationship with our primary partner, the host country government (Unintelligible) in UNAIDS and we are constantly asking ourselves, what impact, what choices because we all know there are more good choices in which to invest HIV/AIDS and your money and so you really have to focus on what is the impact on human beings. Will you prevent an infection? Will you provide desperately needed care or treatment or will you help a family who sold all of its lands to those whose last resources. I guess two memories that keep me up at night are sitting with women in Uganda, part of that wonderful Ugandan women's group working against AIDS, who are making scrapbooks for their children that say, this is who your parents, as they are dying, this is who your father was, this is who your mother is. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    351766
    Peer Reviewed

    Ensuring the complementarity of country ownership and accountability for results in relation to donor aid: a response.

    Germain A

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2011 Nov; 19(38):141-5.

    This paper focuses on the topic of improving the impact of sexual and reproductive health development assistance from European donors. It touches on country ownership and accountability and uses International Health Partnership+ (IHP+) as an example. In addition, it discusses the need for better funding data and more activity around sexual and reproductive health and rights. It concludes with recommendations for improving aid impact and effectiveness and improving outcome measures.
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  5. 5
    374440

    Taking ownership and driving progress: leading the global movement towards FP2020.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2014 Nov. 8 p.

    This publication outlines how, following the London Summit on Family Planning in 2012, International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) has worked to engage governments, with the aim of building a conducive environment to reach the most vulnerable groups, no matter how remote their location, in order to reach the key goal of ensuring 120 million more women have access to family planning by 2020.
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  6. 6
    375726

    Accelerating change by the numbers. 2016 annual report of the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting: Accelerating change.

    UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2017 Jul. 92 p.

    The 2016 Annual Report for the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting provides two perspectives. This main document, "By the Numbers," analyses progress in quantitative terms, using the Results Framework as a basis. It provides an account of how the budget was allocated and offers profiles of each of the 17 programme countries (excepting Yemen). The profiles present facts on the national context, summarize key achievements, and share operational and financial information.
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