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  1. 1
    115394

    Progress towards health for all: third monitoring report. Progres vers la sante pour tous: troisieme rapport de suivi.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    WORLD HEALTH STATISTICS QUARTERLY. RAPPORT TRIMESTRIEL DE STATISTIQUES SANITAIRES MONDIALES. 1995; 48(3-4):174-249.

    In 1977, the World Health Assembly designated the year 2000 as the time by which it should be possible for all citizens of the world to obtain a level of health that would permit them to be socially and economically productive. This document, which assesses implementation of health-for-all strategies during 1991-93, is the third report to monitor progress toward this goal. The report opens with an introduction describing the monitoring process and the data upon which the assessment was based. The second section of the report describes population and socioeconomic trends and considers such issues as patterns in population growth, longterm trends in births and deaths, social change, age structure, migration, urbanization, refugees and displaced persons, and trends in education. The third section discusses trends in the provision of a healthy environment and promotion of healthy life styles. Section 4 summarizes health status data on life expectancy, mortality rates, causes of death, morbidity trends, disability trends, and the nutritional status of children. Implementation of primary health care (PHC)is covered in the next section, which looks at health education and promotion, food supply and proper nutrition, safe water and basic sanitation, maternal and child care, control of locally endemic diseases, immunization, treatment of common diseases, and PHC coverage. The sixth section assesses the development of health systems based on PHC and looks at national health policies, strategies, and legislation; organization and management of health systems based on PHC, intersectoral collaboration, community involvement, health systems research, technology for PHC delivery, international support for health system development, sustainable development initiatives, and emergency preparedness and relief. Section 7 is devoted to health resources in the areas of financial activities, human resources, the physical infrastructure, and logistics and supplies. The concluding section of the report summarizes the status of 1) the major determinants of health, 2) the implementation of PHC and the development of health systems, and 3) the distribution of health resources. The next in-depth analysis of progress toward health-for-all is scheduled to begin in 1997.
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  2. 2
    099432

    Government of Sierra Leone. National report on population and development. International Conference on Population and Development 1994.

    Sierra Leone. National Population Commission

    Freetown, Sierra Leone, National Population Commission, 1994. [4], 15, [4] p.

    The government of Sierra Leone is very concerned about the poor health status of the country as expressed by the indicators of a high maternal mortality rate (700/100,000), a total fertility rate of 6.2 (in 1985), a crude birth rate of 47/1000 (in 1985), an infant mortality rate of 143/1000 (in 1990), and a life expectancy at birth of only 45.7 years. A civil war has exacerbated the already massive rural-urban migration in the country. Despite severe financial constraints, the government has contributed to the UN Population Fund and continues to appeal to the donor community for technical and financial help to support the economy in general and population programs in particular. Sierra Leone has participated in preparations for and fully supports the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. This document describes Sierra Leone's past, present, and future population and development linkages. The demographic context is presented in terms of size and growth rate; age and sex composition; fertility; mortality; and population distribution, migration, and urbanization. The population policy planning and program framework is set out through discussions of the national perception of population issues, the national population policy, population in development planning, and a profile of the national population program [including maternal-child health and family planning (FP) services; information, education, and communication; data collection, analysis, and research; primary health care, population and the environment; youth and adolescents and development; women and development; and population distribution and migration]. The operational aspects of the program are described with emphasis on political and national support, FP service delivery and coverage, monitoring and evaluation, and funding. The action plan for the future includes priority concerns; an outline of the policy framework; the design of population program activities; program coordination, monitoring, and evaluation; and resource mobilization. The government's commitment is reiterated in a summary and in 13 recommendations of action to strengthen the population program, address environmental issues, improve the status of women, improve rural living conditions, and improve data collection.
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  3. 3
    182169
    Peer Reviewed

    Reducing child mortality: Can public health deliver?

    Bryce J; el Arifeen S; Pariyo G; Lanata CF; Gwatkin D

    Lancet. 2003 Jul 12; 362(9378):159-164.

    This is the third paper in the series on child survival. The second paper in the series, published last week, concluded that in the 42 countries with 90% of child deaths worldwide in 2000, 63% of these deaths could have been prevented through full implementation of a few known and effective interventions. Levels of coverage with these interventions are still unacceptably low in most low-income and middle-income countries. Worse still, coverage for some interventions, such as immunisations and attended delivery, are stagnant or even falling in several of the poorest countries. This paper highlights the importance of separating biological or behavioural interventions from the delivery systems required to put them in place, and the need to tailor delivery strategies to the stage of health-system development. We review recent initiatives in child health and discuss essential aspects of delivery systems, including: need for data at the subnational level to support health planning; regular monitoring of provision and use of health services, and of intervention coverage; and the need to achieve high and equitable coverage with selected interventions. Community-based initiatives can extend the delivery of interventions in areas where health services are hard to access, but strengthening national health systems should be the long-term aim. The millennium development goal for child survival can be achieved, but only if strategies for delivery interventions are greatly improved and scaled-up. (author's)
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  4. 4
    375280

    World Malaria Report 2016.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. 186 p.

    The World Health Organization’s (WHO) World Malaria Report 2016 reveals that children and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa have greater access to effective malaria control. Across the region, a steep increase in diagnostic testing for children and preventive treatment for pregnant women has been reported over the last five years. Among all populations at risk of malaria, the use of insecticide-treated nets has expanded rapidly. But in many countries in the region, substantial gaps in programme coverage remain. Funding shortfalls and fragile health systems are undermining overall progress, jeopardizing the attainment of global targets.
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  5. 5
    344641

    World health statistics 2017. Monitoring health for the SDGs, Sustainable Development Goals.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO , 2017. 116 p.

    The World Health Statistics series is WHO’s annual compilation of health statistics for its 194 Member States. World Health Statistics 2017 compiles data on 21 health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) targets, with 35 indicators, as well as data on life expectancy. This edition also includes, for the first time, success stories from several countries that are making progress towards the health-related SDG targets.
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  6. 6
    375796

    World malaria report 2017.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 196 p.

    The World malaria report, published annually, provides a comprehensive update on global and regional malaria data and trends. The latest report, released on 29 November 2017, tracks investments in malaria programmes and research as well as progress across all intervention areas: prevention, diagnosis, treatment and surveillance. It also includes dedicated chapters on malaria elimination and on key threats in the fight against malaria. The report is based on information received from national malaria control programmes and other partners in endemic countries; most of the data presented is from 2016.
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  7. 7
    375903

    World health statistics 2018: monitoring health for the SDGs, sustainable development goals.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2018. 100 p.

    The World Health Statistics series is WHO’s annual snapshot of the state of the world’s health. This 2018 edition contains the latest available data for 36 health-related Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) indicators. It also links to the three SDG-aligned strategic priorities of the WHO’s 13th General Programme of Work: achieving universal health coverage, addressing health emergencies and promoting healthier populations.
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