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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    121436

    HIV / AIDS workshop: community-based prevention and control strategies, Volume II. Khon Kaen, Thailand, November 15-26, 1993. Report.

    Garcia C

    Woking, England, Plan International, 1993. [6], 61 p.

    This report contains the proceedings of the portion of a 1993 HIV/AIDS workshop held in Thailand dealing with community-based prevention and control strategies. The report opens by identifying PLAN international's identity, vision, and mission. The next section reviews PLAN's policy on children directly or indirectly affected by HIV/AIDS. Section 3 brings perspectives from Burkina Faso, India, Kenya, Thailand, and Zimbabwe to the problem of home care, and section 4 applies perspectives from Indonesia, Kenya, the Philippines, Senegal, and Zimbabwe to the evaluation of health education interventions. Section 5 presents a commentary on planning, monitoring, and evaluating PLAN's AIDS programming, and section 6 summarizes a group discussion on possible future actions that PLAN should take. The seventh section of the report contains profiles of the HIV/AIDS situation in Burkina Faso, India, Indonesia, Kenya, the Philippines, Senegal, Thailand, and Zimbabwe. The report ends with a description of the collaboration between the Family AIDS Caring Trust and PLAN International in Zimbabwe.
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  2. 2
    182393

    HIV / AIDS and STI prevention and care in Rwandan refugee camps in the United Republic of Tanzania.

    African Medical and Research Foundation [AMREF]; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], 2003 Mar. 28 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection. Key Material; UNAIDS/03.16E)

    Until recently, relatively little attention had been paid to HIV/AIDS care and prevention in the context of a humanitarian response. Traditional priorities in emergencies included the provision of food, water, sanitation, shelter and basic health services. Because of the long incubation period of HIV, the disease was not considered an immediate threat to life and was therefore not thought of as a ‘relief issue’. Factors (such as poverty, social instability and powerlessness), typically associated with conflicts and the forced displacement of people, were already known to exacerbate HIV transmission. Until the catastrophic Rwandan refugee crisis of 1994, however, there was little appreciation of how very significant these factors were. Before that date, no major specific interventions for HIV infection or for other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) had been designed for refugees. This monograph documents the first large-scale AIDS and STI intervention programme to be implemented during a refugee crisis. It describes the operational aspects of the intervention, the observed impact and the effect this experience had on policies and practices in other refugee situations, among both international and nongovernmental organizations. It provides insights into the elements and approaches for STI services that will be useful for reproductive health programme managers from government and international organizations as well as nongovernmental organizations involved in relief operations. It will also be useful for district or regional health managers in identifying needed support systems for STI service delivery. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    303032

    Implementation of the Declaration of Commitment on HIV / AIDS: core indicators. United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV / AIDS.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2002 Aug. [2] p.

    Global commitment and action: 1. Amount of funds spent by international donors on HIV/ AIDS in developing countries and countries in transition; 2. Amount of public funds available for research and development of vaccines and microbicides; 3. Percentage of transnational companies that are present in developing countries and that have HIV/AIDS workplace policies and programmes; 4. Percentage of international organizations that have HIV/AIDS workplace policies and programmes; 5. Assessment of HIV/AIDS advocacy efforts. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    313133

    Good policy and practice in HIV and AIDS and education. Booklet 1: Overview.

    Attawell K; Elder K

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 May. 24 p. (Good Policy and Practice in HIV and AIDS and Education Booklet No. 1; ED-2006/WS/2; cld 26002)

    HIV and AIDS affect the demand for, supply and quality of education. In some countries, the epidemic is reducing demand for education, as children become sick or are taken out of school and as fewer households are financially able to support their children?s education. However, it is difficult to generalize about the impact of HIV and AIDS on educational demand and important not to make assumptions about declining enrolments. Lack of accurate data on this question is a problem. For example, in Botswana absenteeism rates are relatively low in primary schools and there is some evidence to show that orphans have better attendance records than non-orphans. In Malawi and Uganda, where absenteeism is high among all primary school age students, there is less difference in school attendance between orphans and non-orphans than expected . (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    322939
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO global strategy for the prevention and control of sexually transmitted infections: Time for action.

    Lewis DA; Latif AS; Ndowa F

    Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2007; 83:508-509.

    Worldwide, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) continue to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Global estimates suggest that more than 340 million new cases of syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydial infection and trichomoniasis occurred throughout the world in 1999. Congenital syphilis, prevention of which is relatively easy and cost-effective, may still be responsible for as many as 14% of neonatal deaths. Up to 10% of those women who are untreated, or inadequately treated, for chlamydial and gonococcal infections may become infertile as a consequence. On a global scale, up to 4000 newborn babies each year may become blind because of gonococcal and chlamydial ophthalmia neonatorum. There is evidence that STIs may enhance both the transmission and acquisition of HIV infection, and that improved control of STIs may slow down HIV transmission. The prevention and control of STIs is not an easy task. Epidemiological patterns of STIs vary geographically and are influenced by cultural, political, economical and social forces. Many affected by STIs are in marginalised vulnerable groups. The asymptomatic nature of some STIs remains a challenge to healthcare providers in areas of the world where laboratory screening tests are unaffordable. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    353472

    Practical guidelines for supporting EDUCAIDS implementation.

    Greenall M

    Paris, France, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization [UNESCO], 2012. 158 p.

    The education sector has a significant role to play in the response to HIV and AIDS. The sector can help to prevent the spread of HIV through education, and, in countries that are highly affected by HIV, by taking steps to protect itself from the effects of the epidemic. It can also make a significant contribution by supporting health improvement more generally and by helping to improve the sexual and reproductive health of young people in particular.This framework is designed to help those working in the education sector at a national level to understand the need for a robust response to HIV and AIDS in order to achieve Education for All (EFA) and the education-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The document also highlights the education sector’s role in contributing to universal access to HIV and AIDS prevention, treatment, care and support.
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