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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    180789

    Military networks for surveillance of communicable diseases.

    D'Amelio R; Heymann D

    Civil-Military Alliance Newsletter. 1997 Jul; 3(3):6-7.

    This article reviews the complementary initiatives between the Civil-Military Alliance to Combat HIV & AIDS and the Division of Emerging and other Communicable Diseases Surveillance and Control of the World Health Organization in Geneva. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    182515

    Challenges for communicable disease surveillance and control in southern Iraq, April-June 2003. Letter from Basrah.

    Valenciano M; Coulombier D; Lopes Cardozo B; Colombo A; Alla MJ

    JAMA. 2003 Aug 6; 290(5):654-658.

    The recent war in Iraq presents significant challenges for the surveillance and control of communicable diseases. In early April 2003, the World Health Organization (WHO) sent a team of public health experts to Kuwait and a base was established in the southern Iraqi governorate of Basrah on May 3. We present the lessons learned from the communicable disease surveillance and control program implemented in the Basrah governorate in Iraq (population of 1.9 million) in April and May 2003, and we report communicable disease surveillance data through June 2003. Following the war, communicable disease control programs were disrupted, access to safe water was reduced, and public health facilities were looted. Rapid health assessments were carried out in health centers and hospitals to identify priorities for action. A Health Sector Coordination Group was organized with local and international health partners, and an early warning surveillance system for communicable disease was set up. In the first week of May 2003, physicians in hospitals in Basrah suspected cholera cases and WHO formed a cholera control committee. As of June 29, 2003, Iraqi hospital laboratories have con firmed 94 cases of cholera from 7 of the 8 districts of the Basrah governorate. To prevent the transmission of major communicable diseases, restoring basic public health and water/sanitation services is currently a top priority in Iraq. Lack of security continues to be a barrier for effective public health surveillance and response in Iraq. (author's)
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  3. 3
    193335
    Peer Reviewed

    Global efforts to eradicate polio.

    Krym VF; MacDonald RD

    CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal. 2004 Jan 20; 170(2):189-190.

    As of Oct. 29, 2003, Nigeria gained the dubious honour of having the highest number of reported cases of polio (217 new cases) in the world, surpassing the previous leader, India. The resurgence of poliomyelitis in northern Nigeria poses a threat to neighbouring countries and further postpones the goal of the World Health Organization (WHO) to eradicate the disease globally. This is by no means an impossible goal: humans are the only natural reservoir, an inexpensive and effective vaccine is available, immunity is life-long, and the virus can survive for only a very short time outside the human host. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    274986

    International Coordinating Group on Vaccine Provision for Epidemic Meningitis Control. Summary report. Geneva, Switzerland, 16-17 January 1997.

    International Coordinating Group on Vaccine Provision for Epidemic Meningitis Control

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Division of Emerging and Other Communicable Diseases Surveillance and Control, 1997. 19 p. (WHO/EMC/ DIS/ICG/97.9)

    This was the first meeting of the International Coordinating Group (ICG) proposed at the 2-3 December, 1996 meeting of the Ad Hoc Working Group on WHO Strategy for Provision of Meningitis Vaccine for Epidemic Prevention and Control. The meeting was chaired by Dr d'Almeida, DPM, AFRO, and the agenda and list of participants are provided as annexes. The objectives of the meeting were to define terms of reference, agree on the membership of the International Coordinating Group (ICG) and its Executive Sub-Group, to establish the criteria for determining priority distribution of vaccine for epidemic control in the 1997 season, for which only 14 million doses of vaccine would be available, and to consider a strategy for ensuring adequate vaccine supplies in future years. The expected outcome of the meeting was to obtain agreement on the responsibilities of the ICG and its Executive Sub-Group, on the criteria for vaccine distribution in 1997, on a funding mechanism for an emergency stock of vaccines and auto-destruct syringes, and on a strategy to address adequate vaccine and syringe supplies for future years. The meeting met these goals. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    312473

    Advocacy, communication and social mobilization to fight TB : a 10-year framework for action.

    Deane J; Parks W

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2006. 93 p. (WHO/HTM/STB/2006.37)

    A significant scaling up of advocacy, communication and social mobilization (ACSM) will be needed to achieve the global targets for tuberculosis control as detailed in the Global Plan to Stop TB 2006--2015. In 2005, the ACSM Working Group (ACSM WG) was established as the seventh working group of the Stop TB Partnership to mobilize political, social and financial resources; to sustain and expand the global movement to eliminate TB; and to foster the development of more effective ACSM programming at country level in support of TB control. It succeeded an earlier Partnership Task Force on Advocacy and Communications. This work-plan focuses on those areas where ACSM has most to offer and where ACSM strategies can be most effectively concentrated to help address four key challenges to TB control at country level: Improving case detection and treatment adherence; Combating stigma and discrimination; Empowering people affected by TB; Mobilizing political commitment and resources for TB. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    331891

    Improving effectiveness and outcomes for the poor in health, nutrition, and population: an evaluation of World Bank Group support since 1997.

    World Bank. Independent Evaluation Group

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Independent Evaluation Group, 2009. [220] p.

    The World Bank Group’s support for health, nutrition, and population (HNP) has been sustained since 1997 -- totaling $17 billion in country-level support by the World Bank and $873 million in private health and pharmaceutical investments by the International Finance Corporation (IFC) through mid-2008. This report evaluates the efficacy of the Bank Group’s direct support for HNP to developing countries since 1997 and draws lessons to help improve the effectiveness of this support.
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