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  1. 1
    178125

    Education for All: Is the the world on track?

    UNESCO

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2002. 310 p.

    The Report is presented in six parts. Chapter 1 reaffirms why Education for All is of such overriding importance. Chapter 2 updates our understanding of progress towards, and prospects for, achieving the six EFA goals. Chapter 3 examines the international response to the call for EFA National Action Plans, the engagement of civil society in planning, and whether the distinctive challenges of HIV/AIDS, and conflict and emergency are being confronted. Chapter 4 assesses the costs of achieving the EFA goals and the availability of the resources to secure them. Chapter 5 explores whether the international commitments made in Dakar, and subsequently, are being met and, if so, by what means. Finally, Chapter 6 putts some of these threads together as a basis for looking forward and identifying opportunities for sustaining the momentum generated by the World Education Forum. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    281287

    CAH progress report, 2000.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development, 2001. [59] p. (WHO/FCH/CAH/01.12)

    CAH has continued to strengthen catalytic linkages with other WHO departments, UN agencies, bilateral agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), private voluntary organizations and foundations. These partners play an important role in assessing the need for strategies for child and adolescent health and development and in supporting their implementation. Strong collaboration exists with a range of partners inside and outside WHO. It is through these partnerships that CAH is able to build capacity and extend the application of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) and adolescent health and development interventions. This progress report provides an informative summary of the work of the Department midway through the current biennium. Chapter 1 describes the Department’s global priorities in child and adolescent health, and efforts to address them. Chapters 2–4 summarize the year’s work in three topic areas—promoting a safe and supportive environment, improving health service delivery, and monitoring and evaluation. The final chapter describes collaboration with partners and continuing efforts to expand capacity for sound public health programming at all levels. A full programme report will be prepared at the close of the 2000–2001 biennium. The CAH staff in Headquarters, in the Regional Offices and in countries invite you to read this report, make suggestions, and join us in our efforts to mobilize the global community in promoting the health of children and adolescents. In addition, we would like to take this opportunity to thank those who have provided support to our activities, both technical and financial. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    281286

    Child and adolescent health and development progress report, 2000-2001.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development, 2002. [121] p. (WHO/FCH/CAH/02.19)

    The Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development (CAH) continues to strengthen its leadership position as the technical expert in child and adolescent health and development issues. The Department encourages efforts to reduce illness and death and promote growth among newborns, infants, children and adolescents, and furthermore supports children and adolescents to develop to their full potential and to participate meaningfully in society. To address the multitude of child and adolescent concerns the Department is subdivided into four teams: Neonatal and Infant Health and Development (HNI), Child Health and Development (CHD), Adolescent Health and Development (ADH), and Technical Support (TST). This report is structured according to activities for each of the age groupings. Whether to reduce deaths among newborns or respond to adolescent development problems, the work of CAH is guided by a well-defined cycle of research; development tools, standards and guidelines adapted to local country needs; support to the introduction of tools in different countries, followed by monitoring and evaluation of the impact of interventions. This approach ensures that countries are assisted in their efforts to implement the strategies identified by prior research, and that implementation experiences stimulate and define research and development priorities. The Department’s work is also anchored in a public health perspective, a life course approach and guided by principles related to equity and child rights. One of the Department’s major goals is to build regional and country capacity for implementing effective interventions. The Department backs joint technical work with Regional and Country Offices and supports WHO staff working as medical officers, associate professional officers and national officers. CAH also works closely with country authorities and a wide range of partners to provide broader support and technical expertise. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    296082

    MICS, Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2005 Mar. [2] p.

    The Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) is a household survey programme developed by UNICEF to assist countries in filling data gaps for monitoring human development in general and the situation of children and women in particular. MICS is capable of producing statistically sound, internationally comparable estimates of social indicators such as the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) indicators. It is a flexible tool that is reasonably inexpensive and relatively quick to implement. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    311836
    Peer Reviewed

    Assessment of gross motor development in the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study.

    Wijnhoven TM; de Onis M; Onyango AW; Wang T; Bjoerneboe GE

    Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 2004; 25 Suppl 1:S37-S45.

    The objective of the Motor Development Study was to describe the acquisition of selected gross motor milestones among affluent children growing up in different cultural settings. This study was conducted in Ghana, India, Norway, Oman, and the United States as part of the longitudinal component of the World Health Organization (WHO) Multicentre Growth Reference Study (MGRS). Infants were followed from the age of four months until they could walk independently. Six milestones that are fundamental to acquiring self-sufficient erect locomotion and are simple to evaluate were assessed: sitting without support, hands-and-knees crawling, standing with assistance, walking with assistance, standing alone, and walking alone. The information was collected by both the children's caregivers and trained MGRS fieldworkers. The caregivers assessed and recorded the dates when the milestones were achieved for the first time according to established criteria. Using standardized procedures, the fieldworkers independently assessed the motor performance of the children and checked parental recording at home visits. To ensure standardized data collection, the sites conducted regular standardization sessions. Data collection and data quality control took place simultaneously. Data verification and cleaning were performed until all queries had been satisfactorily resolved. (author's)
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