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  1. 1
    332284

    Progress on sanitation and drinking-water. 2010 update.

    WHO / UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation.

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2010. [60] p.

    This report describes the status and trends with respect to the use of safe drinking-water and basic sanitation, and progress made towards the MDG drinking-water and sanitation target. As the world approaches 2015, it becomes increasingly important to identify who are being left behind and to focus on the challenges of addressing their needs. This report presents some striking disparities: the gap between progress in providing access to drinking-water versus sanitation; the divide between urban and rural populations in terms of the services provided; differences in the way different regions are performing, bearing in mind that they started from different baselines; and disparities between different socioeconomic strata in society. Each JMP report assesses the situation and trends anew and so this JMP report supersedes previous reports. The information presented in this report includes data from household surveys and censuses completed during the period 2007-2008. It also incorporates datasets from earlier surveys and censuses that have become available to JMP since the publication of the previous JMP report in 2008. In total, data from around 300 surveys and censuses covering the period 1985 - 2008, has been added to the JMP database. The updated estimates for 2008, 2000 and 1990 are given in the statistical table starting on page 38. This table for the first time shows the number of people who gained access to improved sanitation and drinking-water sources in the period 1990-2008. It is important to note that the data in this report do not yet reflect the efforts of the International Year of Sanitation 2008, which mobilized renewed support around the world to stop the practice of open defecation and to promote the use of latrines and toilets. (Excerpt)
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  2. 2
    063126

    Population education in the organized sector of Sudan.

    Khalil K

    [Unpublished] [1987]. 22 p.

    Since 1978, the Sudanese Ministry of Social Services and Administration Reform, through the Public Corporation for Workers' Education (PCWE), has provided a workers' population education program in Sudan. Rationale for and description of the expansion of the program to the organized labor sector of Gezira Province in 1984-86 is provided. The program was expanded to the organized sector in hopes of sparking greater understanding and awareness of population issues, garnering trade union involvement, increasing acceptance of new family norms, increasing understanding of population size as it relates to quality of life, and developing worker motivators. The 1984 Working Plan included 10 seminars, 18 meetings, and 24 symposia over 2 years reaching more than 10,000 workers and family members. This level of participation represented a small fraction of the total target population, yet constitutes a limited, small-scale communication impact. The United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA) has funded a 2nd phase of the project.
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  3. 3
    182047

    Human development report 2003. Millennium Development Goals: a compact among nations to end human poverty.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    New York, New York, Oxford University Press, 2003. xv, 367 p.

    The central part of this Report is devoted to assessing where the greatest problems are, analysing what needs to be done to reverse these setbacks and offering concrete proposals on how to accelerate progress everywhere towards achieving all the Goals. In doing so, it provides a persuasive argument for why, even in the poorest countries, there is still hope that the Goals can be met. But though the Goals provide a new framework for development that demands results and increases accountability, they are not a programmatic instrument. The political will and good policy ideas underpinning any attempt to meet the Goals can work only if they are translated into nationally owned, nationally driven development strategies guided by sound science, good economics and transparent, accountable governance. That is why this Report also sets out a Millennium Development Compact. Building on the commitment that world leaders made at the 2002 Monterrey Conference on Financing for Development to forge a “new partnership between developed and developing countries”—a partnership aimed squarely at implementing the Millennium Declaration—the Compact provides a broad framework for how national development strategies and international support from donors, international agencies and others can be both better aligned and commensurate with the scale of the challenge of the Goals. And the Compact puts responsibilities squarely on both sides: requiring bold reforms from poor countries and obliging donor countries to step forward and support those efforts. (excerpt)
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