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  1. 51
    309779

    Colombia: Offering expertise to a sister organization in Ethiopia, Part 2.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Sep; (9):[2] p..

    Representatives from the Asociación Pro-Bienestar de la Familia Colombiana (PROFAMILIA) in Colombia visited the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) in the second half of a technical assistance exchange project. FGAE is expanding its institutional focus from family planning to sexual and reproductive health with a special emphasis on young people. Representatives from the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) and the IPPF Africa Regional Office visited PROFAMILIA/Colombia in March 2001 to see PROFAMILIA's youth programs and services first-hand. The exchange was the first half of a technical assistance project that is funded by the IPPF "i3" Youth Program (Innovate, Indicate, Inform). IPPF/WHR had identified PROFAMILIA as a "best practices" FPA which could offer its expertise in developing youth programs to the FPA in Ethiopia. Zhenja, the IPPF/WHR Communications Manager, was there to facilitate the visit and identify needs for technical assistance. (excerpt)
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  2. 52
    309778

    China: Helping the People's Republic of China introduce a gender perspective in its 'reoriented' family planning program.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Aug; (8):[2] p..

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region staff traveled to China to provide technical assistance to the Ford Foundation project "Gender Perspective in Quality of Care in Family Planning." They reviewed some basic concepts of gender and quality, and then examined the six instruments in the manual that is being adapted for China. In July 2001, Judith H., director of IPPF/WHR's Sexual and Reproductive Health Unit, visited with members of the China Population Information and Research Center and the All-China Women's Federation in Beijing to provide technical assistance to the Ford Foundation-supported project, "Gender Perspective in Quality of Care in Family Planning." (excerpt)
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  3. 53
    309776

    Belize: Efficient services with a human face.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Jul; (6):[2] p..

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region staff visited Belize in June 2001 to work with the Belize Family Life Association (BFLA) on sustainability and management aspects of its strategic plan for sexual and reproductive health care. The slogan they developed was Efficient Services with a Human Face." IPPF/WHR Senior Program Advisors Lucella and Humberto were in Belize in June 2001 to work with IPPF/WHR's affiliate there, the Belize Family Life Association (BFLA), on the sustainability and management aspects of its strategic plan. BFLA recently received a grant from the Summit Foundation to construct a new headquarters that will allow for expanded services. (excerpt)
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  4. 54
    309775

    Guatemala: Orienting affiliates on the design and implementation of a state-of-the-art management system.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Jun; (5):[2] p..

    A three-person team from International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region conducted a training workshop in Guatemala for several affiliates on the design and implementation of the Integrated Management System and also received feedback on the system. A three-person team from IPPF/WHR recently conducted a training workshop in Antigua, Guatemala for several IPPF/WHR affiliates on the design and implementation of the highly anticipated Integrated Management System (IMS). The workshop was an opportunity both to orient the participants to the new system as well as to get their feedback on the IMS and the extent to which it meets their needs. WHR team members included Leslie, Director of MIS, María Cristina, Regional Supplies Officer, and Rupal, Evaluation Officer. (excerpt)
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  5. 55
    309774

    Trinidad and Guyana: Increasing sustainability by expanding services in the Caribbean.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 May; (4):[2] p..

    A team from International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region traveled to Trinidad to conduct a Proposal Writing Workshop for ten affiliates who have programs on HIV prevention and youth. Then they went to Guyana to provide technical assistance and training for a sustainability model. Lucella, IPPF/WHR's Senior Program Advisor for the Caribbean, was recently in Trinidad as a member of a team conducting a Proposal Writing Workshop for ten IPPF/WHR affiliates. The following week she traveled to Guyana with another team from WHR, one that provided training in the use of the S2000ä Financial Model, a cash flow forecasting tool developed by the EFS (Endowment Fund for Sustainability). (excerpt)
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  6. 56
    309773

    Colombia: Offering expertise to a sister organization in Ethiopia, Part 1.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Apr; (3):[2] p..

    Representatives from the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) and the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Africa Regional Office visited the Asociación Pro-Bienestar de la Familia Colombiana (PROFAMILIA) in March 2001 to see PROFAMILIA's youth programs and services. The exchange was the first half of a technical assistance project; PROFAMILIA was identified as a "best practices" organization that could offer its expertise to FGAE. Representatives from PROFAMILIA/Colombia visited the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) in August 2001 for the second half of a technical assistance exchange project. The project, which in March 2001 allowed for FGAE representatives to visit Colombia, is funded by the IPPF "i3" Youth Program (Innovate, Indicate, Inform). FGAE is expanding its institutional focus from family planning to sexual and reproductive health with a special emphasis on young people. PROFAMILIA was identified as a "best practices" organization to provide technical assistance on youth programs. (excerpt)
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  7. 57
    309772

    Haiti: Development of management and logistics resources to improve quality of care.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Apr; (2):[2] p..

    A four-person team from International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region visited Haiti to provide technical assistance, focusing on project management and reporting, logistics and budgeting. A four-person team from IPPF/WHR was in Haiti on March 4th - 9th to work with two of the country's largest family planning organizations, PROFAMIL and FOSREF. Team members included Eva, a Program Advisor and resource development specialist; Rebecca, an Evaluation Officer; María Cristina, the Regional Supplies Officer; and Marcos, a Financial Advisor. IPPF/WHR monitors PROFAMIL's IPPF Vision 2000 Project to improve quality of care and increase access to SRH services. On this technical assistance visit, the IPPF/WHR team focused on project management and reporting, logistics, and budgeting. (excerpt)
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  8. 58
    309767

    IPPF statement to the Commission on Population and Development.

    Sinding S

    New York, New York, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], Western Hemisphere Region [WHR], 2002 May 15. [4] p.

    On April 3, 2002, Steven Sinding, director-general designate of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, delivered a speech to the Commission on Population and Development in New York. The speech summarizes priorities for evaluating progress made in the implementation of the Program of Action adopted at the International Conference on Population and Developement in Cairo in 1994. I am making this statement today as director-general designate of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, the world's leading voluntary family planning organization. IPPF and its member associations are committed to promoting the right of women and men to decide freely the number, timing, and spacing of their children and the right to the highest possible level of sexual and reproductive health. Founded in 1952, it is a federation linking autonomous national Family Planning Associations working in more than 180 countries around the world, initiating, promoting and providing sexual and reproductive health and rights-based services. Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, IPPF is proud to have an opportunity to address this meeting of the Commission on Population and Development (CPD). (excerpt)
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  9. 59
    309766

    Ecuador: Building a health center dedicated to Ecuadorian youth.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2002 Jul; (14):[2] p..

    Alejandra, senior program officer, and Rebecca, evaluation officer, traveled to Ecuador in June 2002 to monitor the implementation of two adolescent projects funded by the Hewlett and Turner foundations. We spent the first two days of our trip in Guayaquil, where IPPF/WHR's affiliate, APROFE, has its main offices and clinics. This organization has begun providing services tailored to the needs of youth for the first time. Their idea was to build a separate space for youth with funds from the Hewlett Foundation to allow the clients to have access to health care providers who are specially trained to meet their needs as young people. It will also provide them with greater privacy. Unfortunately, there have been some construction delays for the new youth center. APROFE is therefore providing youth services in a section of the main clinic's office which has been refurbished as a youth clinic. I was struck by how friendly and colorful the office looked. There were lots of posters and signs painted by the youth. We also saw the blueprints for the youth center, which APROFE hopes to have completed by December. (excerpt)
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  10. 60
    309765

    Haiti: Improving proposal writing and evaluation skills in Haiti.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2002 Feb; (13):[2] p..

    Several NGOs and government agencies, including IPPF/WHR's affiliate PROFAMIL, are working hard to address the sexual and reproductive health needs of women, men, and youth in Haiti. Recently, IPPF/WHR has sought to support these efforts by strengthening the capacity of PROFAMIL and other agencies to develop and implement results-oriented projects that can become sustainable. A four-person team from IPPF/WHR traveled to Haiti in January 2002 to conduct a project design and proposal writing workshop with representatives from several local NGOs, including PROFAMIL, FOSREF, VDH, UNFPA, and the ministries of Health and Education. Participants came armed with statistics and other information on a specific problem that their organization would like to address, as well as intervention ideas. First, participants developed conceptual models for their project ideas; then they wrote actual proposals to seek funding. Participants used tools, such as a conceptual model and a logical framework, to assist them in the project design and proposal-writing process, with a particular emphasis on integrating monitoring and evaluation plans into their proposed interventions. (excerpt)
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  11. 61
    306843

    Education Sector Global HIV and AIDS Readiness Survey, 2004: policy implications for education and development. An integration of perspectives from ministries of education and civil society organizations.

    Badcock-Walters P; Boler T

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006. 64 p.

    This report documents the outcomes of the first international survey of education sector readiness to manage and mitigate the impact of HIV and AIDS. Ministries of education (MoEs) in 71 countries and civil society organizations in 18 countries were interviewed, in person and electronically, in separate research processes. Both surveys were conducted in 2004 on behalf of the UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on Education. The Global Readiness Survey (GRS) of 71 MoEs was conducted by the Mobile Task Team (MTT) on the Impact of HIV and AIDS on Education, and the Civil Society Survey (CSS) of 18 civil society country interactions was conducted by the Global Campaign for Education (GCE). It should be noted that the GRS research process involved the completion of the questionnaire by an internal committee of senior MoE officials convened for this purpose, independent of an external researcher. Thus the process generated what might be described as 'self-reported information' rather than data in a conventional sense; while this may have its limitations, it nevertheless provides an important insight into the internal perceptions and assumptions of the MoEs involved. (excerpt)
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  12. 62
    306319
    Peer Reviewed

    The multiple worlds of NGOs and HIV / AIDS: rethinking NGOs and their agency.

    Seckinelgin H

    Journal of International Development. 2006; 18:715-727.

    In the last decade NGOs have been recognised as policy actors in general and in the HIV/AIDS field in particular within developing countries. While recognising the agency of these organisations by looking at multiple case studies, the literature has not focused on what is meant by this agency. Furthermore within the policy field the agency of NGOs is assumed and thus these organisations are incorporated as policy implementers in the HIV/AIDS field. This paper argues that there is a need to look at this assumption about agency and what it means for NGOs working in this field. The paper presents a brief theoretical discussion to understand agency within the larger socio-cultural institutionalisation processes and looks at the policy implications of this for NGOs involved in the HIV/AIDS field. (author's)
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  13. 63
    293768

    Thailand's child labor problem.

    Crossette B

    Interdependent. 2006 Summer; 4(2):23-26.

    Nam Phund, who is only 11, begins her work day at 3 am when the night's harvest of shrimp arrives, hours before dawn breaks over the Gulf of Thailand. That's when 13-year-old Fa goes to work, too. She doesn't know exactly how long she works, peeling shrimp for a seafood processing factory, but she says the day has come and gone and the sky is dark again when she goes home. Fa and Nam Phund can't tell time. They can't read. They are among the tens of thousands of migrant workers from Myanmar who have fled the political repression and economic meltdown of a country once known as Burma, and they are not entitled to an education in Thailand. Instead, they work beside their mothers, or alone, on their feet for 14 hours a day or more. The stories of migrant workers in Thailand would not be unfamiliar to Americans, because many of the factors that have brought poor Asians here, often in family groups, are similar to the conditions that propel Mexicans and others to cross the southern United States border. Prosperous Thailand is a magnet, drawing the poor and hopeless from neighboring Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. The booming Thai seafood processing industry needs workers and will pay brokers--many of them no more than illegal traffickers--to find that labor. The reservoir is large. The migrants are willing to do the work Thais no longer want, in the fishing industry, in homes, agriculture and restaurants. Cambodians, in particular, are often turned into beggars on Bangkok streets, under the control of begging syndicates. (excerpt)
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  14. 64
    304388

    Commission on the Status of Women remains a global rallying point.

    One Country. 2006 Jan-Mar; 17(4):6-8.

    Not far from the bright lights of Broadway, a little production with a big message played to a standing room only crowd in late February. In a conference room across the street from United Nations, as part of a "side event" to the 50th annual session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), about 100 people watched 16-year-old Anisa Fedaei portray the daughter of the cocoa farmer in a short play called "Playing the Game." "I am Patience from a developing country and I am 12 years old," said Anisa. "I don't go to school because I help my mother. Our family lives in a small hut. My mother cannot own the land and cannot get credit." But now, "Patience" explains, thanks to the help of a local cooperative, they can invest in the farm and grow enough to trade. (excerpt)
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  15. 65
    303859

    Realizing our victories.

    Berkman A

    Choices. 2004; 7.

    I left the 1998 International AIDS Conference in Geneva frustrated and angry. The slogan of the conference--'Bridging the Gap'--was right on target, but none of the major players in the conference (the international agencies, governments, the big pharmaceutical companies) offered a vision, let alone a strategy, for making life-saving treatments available to the millions of HIV-positive people in poor and developing countries. As has been true since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, it was left to HIV-positive people themselves and to advocacy groups to formulate demands, mobilize the political support to challenge the status quo and lead in the development of new policies. Dramatic changes have occurred between 1998's 'Bridging the Gap' and 2004's 'Access for All' conferences. In the intervening six years, an alliance of NGOs from around the world with a bloc of progressive poor and developing countries has won significant victories: It is no longer morally acceptable to do nothing about the death and suffering of millions; The broader global AIDS community has accepted that any effective approach to stopping the epidemic must include treatment as well as prevention and mitigation. (excerpt)
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  16. 66
    303528

    India: Learning for life. In-school HIV / AIDS education takes off in Tamil Nadu.

    Adolescence Education Newsletter. 2005 Jun; 8(1):12.

    IN JUNE 2004, UNICEF, in collaboration with national organizations, launched Learning for Life, an AIDS education project for Classes 9 and 11 in Tamil Nadu. The plan was to hold HIV/AIDS prevention sessions for 8,185 schools by March 2005. The sessions aimed to give young people an opportunity to learn basic facts about HIV/AIDS and provide them a forum to raise issues related to growing up or the challenges of adolescence. A key material used for these sessions was the "Learning for Life" training manual, which was designed according to the national guidelines developed by the National Council of Education Research and Training (NCERT) and the National AIDS Control Organization (NACO). Partnering UNICEF in this initiative were the Department of Education; Directorate of Teachers Education, Research and Training (DTERT); District Institute of Education and Training (DIET); Tamil Nadu State AIDS Control Soceity (TANSACS); AIDS Prevention and Control Project (APAC-VHS); and core NGOs. (excerpt)
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  17. 67
    295013

    Partnership with the private sector.

    Noehrenberg E

    World Health. 1998 Nov-Dec; 51(6):30.

    The private sector has an important role to play in the global, regional and national response to AIDS. It is in the private sector's own interest to actively combat the expanding epidemic because it affects employees, customers and others in their communities. By working in partnership with the public and nongovernmental sectors, companies can help to make their efforts more effective and bring benefits to all parties concerned. UNAIDS, the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS, is well aware that the fight against AIDS cannot succeed without a broad-based effort involving all members of society, including the private sector. An important part of the mission of UNAIDS is therefore to promote and brokers partnerships among the public, private and nongovernmental sectors of society that can help create a more coordinated, effective and sustainable response to HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
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  18. 68
    303019

    Towards the creation of strategic partnerships: improving access to drugs for HIV / AIDS. Report of a consultative meeting, 30 June - 2 July 1997, Salle C, WHO, Geneva.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1998. 20 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection. Key Material; UNAIDS/98.40)

    From January 1996, the UNAIDS Secretariat has been in consultation with key players in the pharmaceutical industry, NGOs, people living with HIV, UN, major bilateral donors, country representatives and National AIDS Programme Managers on issues relating to access to drugs for HIV/AIDS. This meeting, held on 30 June to 2 July 1997, was the climax of this consultative process. The meeting brought together people living with HIV/AIDS, NGO representatives, National AIDS Programme Managers and UN representatives. With a modified version of the Search Conference approach, the following questions were raised: What are the current and future issues on access to drugs for HIV/AIDS at country and global levels? What partnerships should be created at country level to address these issues? What should be the content of these partnerships at country level? What should the UN do at global and country level to support these partnerships? To foster regional exchange of experience as well as enhance regional specificity, participants were assigned groups on a regional basis. (excerpt)
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  19. 69
    303289

    NGO perspectives on access to HIV-related drugs in 13 Latin American and Caribbean countries.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1998. 32 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection. Key Material; UNAIDS/98.25)

    The aim of this document is to point out the most important ways in which NGOs concerned with HIV/ AIDS and with the persons who have this infection in Latin America and the Caribbean help facilitate access to HIV-related drugs. During the XIth Conference on AIDS, the slogan "No greed, access to all!" was heard. The immediate reason was that the new AIDS drugs, the protease inhibitors, had a high price. This does not, of course, mean that access to all other AIDS-related drugs was easy. It was not, and it is not, especially for persons in developing countries. Thus, although lack of access to AIDS-related drugs is an old subject in developing countries, this topic aroused renewed interest when it affected developed countries. Access to treatment has become a global issue and has given rise to a new phase of global solidarity. (excerpt)
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  20. 70
    302116
    Peer Reviewed

    Effect of an armed conflict on human resources and health systems in Cote d'Ivoire: Prevention of and care for people with HIV/AIDS.

    Betsi NA; Koudou BG; Cisse G; Tschannen AB; Pignol AM

    AIDS Care. 2006 May; 18(4):356-365.

    In September 2002, an armed conflict erupted in Cote d'Ivoire which has since divided the country in the government-held south and the remaining territory controlled by the 'Forces Armees des Forces Nouvelles' (FAFN). There is concern that conflict-related population movements, breakdown of health systems and food insecurity could significantly increase the incidence of HIV infections and other sexually-transmitted infections, and hence jeopardize the country's ability to cope with the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Our objective was to assess and quantify the effect this conflict had on human resources and health systems that provide the backbone for prevention, treatment and care associated with HIV/AIDS. We obtained data through a questionnaire survey targeted at key informants in 24 urban settings in central, north and west Cote d'Ivoire and reviewed relevant Ministry of Health (MoH) records. We found significant reductions of health staff in the public and private sector along with a collapse of the health system and other public infrastructures, interruption of condom distribution and lack of antiretrovirals. On the other hand, there was a significant increase of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), some of which claim a partial involvement in the combat with HIV/AIDS. The analysis shows the need that these NGOs, in concert with regional and international organizations and United Nations agencies, carry forward HIV/AIDS prevention and care efforts, which ought to be continued through the post-conflict stage and then expanded to comprehensive preventive care, particularly antiretroviral treatment. (author's)
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  21. 71
    301425
    Peer Reviewed

    Realizing women's human rights in Asia: the UN Women's Convention and the optional protocol.

    Tang KL; Cheung J

    Asian Journal of Women's Studies. 2003 Dec 31; 9(4):[13] p..

    Different international legal agreements have been arrived at by nations to deal with the global problem of discrimination against women, the most important of which is the Convention on the Elmination of All Eorms of Discrimination against Women (the Women's Convention). This paper discusses the importance of the Optional Protocol to the Women's Convention for Asian women, which was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1999. It provides for an individual complaint procedure against violations of women's rights and allows the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) to conduct special investigations into violations of women's rights. Asian countries have been very slow to ratify the Protocol. Many Asian women are not aware of the potential gains and protection that could come from international human rights law for women. To benefit from the Optional Protocol, women's groups and NGOs in Asia would have to promote the idea of individual complaints against their own governments through education and publicity. Their support to individual women to pursue their cases at the international level is deemed indispensable. (author's)
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  22. 72
    299841

    Reproductive health in post-transition Mongolia: global discourses and local realities.

    Rak K; Janes CR

    Perspectives on Global Development and Technology. 2004; 3(1-2):171-196.

    Global reproductive health policy is based on assumptions, couched in scientific language, that technological methods of birth control are superior to traditional methods, use of these methods is more modern and "rational" than alternatives, and abortion should not be considered a form of birth control. The authority these assumptions have achieved in global health circles prevents alternative options from being considered. Our research on women's birth control experiences in Mongolia suggests that reproductive health programs based on such global assumptions fail to consider the local cultural contexts of reproductive decision-making address women's needs, and are therefore seriously flawed. (author's)
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  23. 73
    297795

    HIV and AIDS in Armenia: a socio-cultural approach.

    Papoyan A; Arakelyan A; Bakshinyan E

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Division of Cultural Policies and Intercultural Dialogue, Culture and Development Section, 2005. 83 p. (CLT/CPD/CAD-05/4B)

    Evaluating and effectively responding to the global challenge of the HIV epidemic requires an indepth understanding of the strong correlation between health and social, cultural and economic conditions, and how these shape behaviour at both individual and societal levels. While the number of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Armenia is comparatively low, the rate is growing rapidly. Current prevalence among officially registered cases is 0.02%. The actual rate of prevalence is estimated to be approximately ten times higher, with a greater prevalence among distinct key population groups. Among the factors driving the HIV epidemic in the country - which faces profound socio-economic, political and cultural changes - are: a particular negative and fearful attitude towards the disease; discrimination against people living with HIV; low level of HIV and AIDS awareness among the population; and an increase in injecting drug use and commercial sex work. In Armenia, HIV-positive people are primarily associated with three key populations that are socially marginalized: commercial sex workers (CSWs), injecting drug users (IDUs) and men who have sex with men (MSM). For many years an individual's positive HIV status has been equated with immoral behaviour. As a result, PLHIV face aggression. Moreover, it is taboo to openly discuss HIV and AIDS, resulting in the further isolation of PLHIV. Currently many programmes have been implemented in Armenia to surmount stigmatization. However, this process demands numerous long-term activities and commitments from the state. (excerpt)
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  24. 74
    297793

    The evaluation of UNESCO Brazil's contribution to the Brazilian AIDS Programme: final report. [Evaluación del aporte de UNESCO Brasil al programa brasileño de lucha contra el SIDA: informe final]

    Stern E

    Brasilia, Brazil, UNESCO, 2005 Jul. [140] p. (BR/2005/PI/H/19)

    This report focuses on the evaluation of the AIDS II programme, as implemented by the UNESCO office in Brazil. The AIDS epidemic has been addressed with particular vigour in Brazil, which is widely recognised as a country that has developed a distinctive and successful model of policy coordination and implementation with regard to HIV/AIDS. In addition to substantial national investment, Brazil has enjoyed co-financing from international sources especially the World Bank. In the course of three programmes - AIDS I (1994-1998), AIDS II (1998-2003) and AIDS III (2003-2007) - the World Bank committed some $365 million, matching a Brazilian Treasury contribution of $325 million. AIDS II with a total resource of $300 million is the largest of these programmes. Since the mid-1990s the UNESCO office in Brazil has grown in terms of funds managed - from some $4.5 million to $108.0 million in 2004, and in staff and activities. The overwhelming proportion of budgetary growth has come from 'extra-budgetary' resources. These are mainly Technical Cooperation agreements with the Brazilian government and with international bodies such as the World Bank. UNESCO was the 'implementing agency' along with UNODC for the AIDS II programme since its launch in 1998. In 2002, the Executive Board of UNESCO accepted a recommendation in an earlier evaluation of UNESCO programmes in Brazil2 that the AIDS II activities of UNESCO be evaluated. This evaluation was subsequently commissioned by the Brasilia office of UNESCO. (excerpt)
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  25. 75
    297609

    Responses to AIDS challenges in Brazil: limits and possibilities. [Respuestas a los desafíos del SIDA en Brasil: límites y posibilidades]

    Castro MG; da Silva LB

    Brasilia, Brazil, UNESCO, 2005 Jun. 680 p.

    UNESCO and the National Program on STD/AIDS, of the Brazilian Ministry of Health, once again establish a partnership to carry out an activity, which records and cooperates towards implementing one of the most successful Brazilian public policies in health, worldwide acknowledged: those oriented to the fight against AIDS. This publication, basically addressed to tackle the dynamics of those agencies participating in AIDS-related governance in Brazil, lists and itemizes practices and representations of collective civil society units, at different territories. Furthermore, it records contemporaneous debates, assessments, criticisms and suggestions, aiming at adjusting the path. (excerpt)
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