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  1. 1
    128289

    The Convention on the Rights of the Child and the World Congress on the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children, Stockholm 1996.

    Lindblad B

    In: Forced labor: the prostitution of children, edited by Maureen Jaffee and Sonia Rosen. Washington, D.C., Department of Labor, Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 1996. 77-80.

    To date, 179 countries have ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. The Committee on the Rights of the Child, which consists of 10 experts who monitor compliance with the convention, is very active and attempts to work in non-traditional ways. For example, 9 of the 10 committee members will be traveling to South Asia for a 2-week field visit facilitated by UNICEF. Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, India, and Sri Lanka will be visited. These trips will allow the committee to get on-site information and develop contacts and dialogue with governments, nongovernmental organizations, and other bodies, in addition to the routine process of reporting established under the convention. The Internal Labor Organization and key international nongovernmental organizations will be present at one consultation with the committee in Nepal. UNICEF is increasingly using the convention and the process of reporting the work of the committee as a basis for its country programming. UNICEF is also increasingly getting involved in child protection issues, and the convention offers new ways to address these problems with governments and other partners. UNICEF's role in the World Congress on the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children is discussed.
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  2. 2
    128286

    The role of the International Labor Organization.

    Boonpala P

    In: Forced labor: the prostitution of children, edited by Maureen Jaffee and Sonia Rosen. Washington, D.C., Department of Labor, Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 1996. 53-62.

    Millions of children are being forced to work as prostitutes. The International Labor Organization (ILO) has made a commitment that child prostitution cannot be tolerated, and all efforts must be made to end the practice. That commitment is reflected in ILO Convention 29 on forced labor, adopted in 1930. The convention aims to suppress the use of all forms of forced labor, and states that the illegal exaction of forced or compulsory labor will be punishable as a penal offence. The ILO Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations first specifically addressed the issue of child prostitution in the context of forced labor in its 1985 report. Furthermore, in its 1992 report to the International Labor Conference, the Committee of Experts identified the use of children as one of the worst forms of forced labor, whether in prostitution or pornography. Convention 29 is linked to a number of other international standards. The International Program on the Elimination of Child Labor (IPEC) experience with child prostitution in Thailand, Philippines, and Nepal is described.
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