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  1. 1
    296499

    Too soon for twilight, too late for dawn: the story of children caught in conflict - includes related articles on the UN General Assembly's stand on child-related issues, participation of children as soldiers, and recommendations for the protection of children during armed conflict - Cover story.

    UN Chronicle. 1996 Winter; 33(4):[12] p..

    In the last decade more than 2 million children have been killed, more than 4 million have survived physical mutilation and more than 1 million have been orphaned or separated from their families. All as a result of war. Joy unblemished as they play outside school, tumbling through the grass with friends, running under a gushing stream of water on a hot evening or down hills stung by snow. Laughter and love. These are the memories of the more innocent times evoked in the minds of many of us as we reminisce about our own childhoods. Where we had time to grow up and only slowly learn the darker ways of the world. But such memories are unimaginably distant from the reality that millions of children, caught up in the deadly games of adults, must confront. Instead, for the increasing numbers of children living in war-torn nations, childhood has become a living nightmare. A just-released United Nations study on the impact of armed conflict on children paints a truly devastating picture of untold suffering and cruelty, of a world increasingly "being sucked into a desolate moral vacuum. This is a space devoid of the most basic human values; a space in which children are slaughtered, raped and maimed; a space in which children are exploited as soldiers; a space in which children are starved and exposed to extreme brutality." The report was the outcome of a two-year investigation that included field visits to battle-scarred areas, dramatic case studies, input from eminent personalities and experts, and consultations with Governments, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), armed opposition movements and children themselves. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    180776

    Malawi: regional policy workshop on AIDS prevention in a civil-military environment.

    Civil-Military Alliance Newsletter. 1996 Aug; 2(3):3-4.

    This article presents excerpts from a speech by Malawi’s First Vice President and Minister of Defence, the Right Honourable Justin C. Malewezi at the opening address to the policy workshop.
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  3. 3
    178047

    AIDS prevention in military populations -- learning the lessons of history.

    Kingma SJ

    [Hanover, New Hampshire], Civil-Military Alliance to Combat HIV and AIDS, 1996. [4] p. (Occasional Paper Series No. 2)

    CONCLUSION: The armed forces that do not deal with HIV prevention will be condemned to deal with AIDS. One can paraphrase the military leader quoted at the outset of this paper by saying that the armed forces that ignore the mission of HIV prevention will be "destined to repeat the errors of history by failing to perceive the impact of [this] disease." The armed forces of all countries must face the increasing risk of HIV infection in their ranks, and address the prevention of AIDS as a priority mission. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    164429

    AIDS and the military: "The quintessential AIDS in the workplace issue".

    Jackson H

    SAfAIDS News. 1996 Jun; 4(2):2-6.

    The interrelationship between AIDS and the military is fraught with ironies and contradictions. High levels of militarization exacerbate the spread of HIV and AIDS, just as civil unrest and wars disrupt a nation's health and welfare services and its capacity to deal with infection. In addition, HIV and AIDS may be a factor increasing civil unrest and destabilization and, at the same time, decreasing military readiness to cope with the unrest. In addition, high levels of HIV in a nation's armed forces transform the military's protective role into one of risk to the civilian population…This article explores the HIV risk in the military and its consequences for military and civilian populations and looks at potential responses. It also documents the development and focus of the Civil- Military Alliance to Combat HIV and AIDS, an initiative by Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS and the WHO. (excerpt, modified)
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