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  1. 1
    073806

    Annual report 1990-1991.

    Association for Voluntary Surgical Contraception [AVSC]

    New York, New York, AVSC, 1991. 28 p.

    The annual report for 1990-1991 of the Association for Voluntary Surgical Contraception (AVSC) enumerates changes that came about in 1990, accomplishments of the last decade, and then summarizes activities by region with a brief feature on 1 country in each. Some of the developments in 1990 included introduction of Norplant, a training workshop in Georgia for physicians from newly independent CIS states, and the Male Involvement Initiative. The Gulf War delayed major activities requiring travel. Overall, in 1990 the AVSC provided 133,328 sterilizations, 72% female and 28% male in 50 countries, trained 325 doctors, led 58 courses in counseling and voluntarism training 568 counselors, and published or collaborated on numerous professional articles and teaching materials. In-country work emphasized no-scalpel vasectomy and minilaparatomy female sterilization under local anesthesia. As an example of country projects in 20 African nations, a client-oriented, provider-efficient system for improving clinic management and quality of care called COPE, was the focus in Kenya. Male responsibility was an emphasis in Latin America. In India, where sterilization is the most popular contraceptive method, training centers were upgraded in 12 states. In the US, AVSC conducted training sessions for physicians in laparoscopy under local anesthesia.
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  2. 2
    067400

    The promotion of family planning by financial payments: the case of Bangladesh.

    Cleland J; Mauldin WP

    STUDIES IN FAMILY PLANNING. 1991 Jan-Feb; 22(1):1-18.

    A study investigative the pros and cons of financial payments for sterilizations to clients, medical personnel, and agents who motivate and refer clients was conducted by the government of Bangladesh in conjunction with the World Bank. Results indicate that Bangladeshi men and women opt to be sterilized both voluntarily and after consideration of the nature and implications of the procedure. Clients were also said to be knowledgeable of alternate methods of controlling fertility. A high degree of client satisfaction was noted overall with, however, 25% regret among those clients with less than 3 children. Money is a contributing factor in a large majority of cases, though dominating as motivation for a small minority. Financial payments to referrers have sparked a proliferation of many unofficial, self-employed agents, especially men recruiting male sterilization. Targeting especially poor potential clients, these agents focus upon sterilization at the expense of other fertility regulating methods, and tend to minimize the cons of the process. Examples of client cases and agents are included in the text along with discussion of implications from study findings.
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