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  1. 1
    069733

    WGNRR maternal mortality and morbidity report -- 1991.

    Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights

    Amsterdam, Netherlands, WGNRR, 1991. 48 p.

    This report summarizes the activities of the Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights (WGNRR), an organization that campaigns to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity, during 1991. In addition to its summary of activities, the report provides examples of local, national, and regional activities which illustrate the efforts of WGNRR's campaign. The report explains that the organization has succeeded in establishing May 28 as the Day of Action for Women's Health. For 1992, WGNRR hopes to make the issue of adolescent mothers the focus of the Day of Action. Having presented excerpts of Martha Rosenberg's paper entitled "Rethinking maternity: a women's task" (presented at the University of Salamanca, Spain on September 1990), the report goes on the describe the work done by WGNRR groups. As an example of a local initiative, the publication discusses the efforts conducted in Tanzania to end sexual harassment. This topic became the focus of the Day of Action. The Tanzania Media Women's Association held a seminar do discuss issues such as rape, media images of women, violence, and harassment in the workplace. The report goes on to describe a national campaign conducted in Chile, a campaign entitled "I am a woman. . . I want to be healthy," which focused on women's demands to humanize health care. For its regional experience, the report discusses accomplishments of the First Regional Workshop on Maternal Mortality, held in Managua in April 1991. The workshop attracted participants from Belize, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Mexico, and Nicaragua. The report also includes an evaluation of the campaign conducted in Lima, Peru. Finally, the report presents excerpts of letters and reports of activities conducted by member groups around the world.
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  2. 2
    066142

    Report of an International Consultation on AIDS and Human Rights. Geneva, 26-28 July 1989. Organized by the Centre for Human Rights with the technical and financial support of the World Health Organization Global Programme on AIDS.

    United Nations. Centre for Human Rights

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1991. iii, 57 p.

    In July 1989, ethicists, lawyers, religious leaders, and health professionals participated in an international consultation on AIDS and human rights in Geneva, Switzerland. The report addressed the public health and human rights rationale for protecting the human rights and dignity of HIV infected people, including those with AIDS. Discrimination and stigmatization only serve to force HIV infected people away from health, educational, and social services and to hinder efforts to prevent and control the spread of HIV. In addition to nondiscrimination, another fundamental human right is the right to life and AIDS threatens life. Governments and the international community are therefore obligated to do all that is necessary to protect human lives. Yet some have enacted restrictions on privacy (compulsory screening and testing), freedom of movement (preventing HIV infected persons from migrating or traveling), and liberty (prison). The participants agreed that everyone has the right to access to up-to-date information and education concerning HIV and AIDS. They did not come to consensus, however, on the need for an international mechanism by which human right abuses towards those with HIV/AIDS can be prevented and redressed. International and health law, human rights, ethics, and policy all must go into any international efforts to preserve human rights of HIV infected persons and to prevent and control the spread of AIDS. The participants requested that this report be distributed to human rights treaty organizations so they can deliberate what action is needed to protect the human rights of those at risk or infected with HIV. They also recommended that governments guarantee that measures relating to HIV/AIDS and concerning HIV infected persons conform to international human rights standards.
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  3. 3
    075888

    The world's women 1970-1990: trends and statistics.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Statistical Office; United Nations. Centre for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs; UNICEF; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM]

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1991. xiv, 120 p. (Social Statistics and Indicators Series K No. 8; ST/ESA/STAT/SER.K/8)

    5 UN agencies worked together to develop this statistical source book to generate awareness of women's status, to guide policy, to stimulate action, and to monitor progress toward improvements. The data clearly show that obvious differences between the worlds of men and women are women's role as childbearer and their almost complete responsibility for family care and household management. Overall, women have gained more control over their reproduction, but their responsibility to their family's survival and their own increased. Women tend to be the providers of last resort for families and themselves, often in hostile conditions. Women have more access to economic opportunities and accept greater economic roles, yet their economic employment often consists of subsistence agriculture and services with low productivity, is separate from men's work, and unequal to men's work. Economists do not consider much of the work women do as having any economic value so they do not even measure it. The beginning of each chapter states the core messages in 4-5 sentences. Each chapter consists of text accompanied by charts, tables, and/or regional stories. The 1st chapter covers women, families, and households. The 2nd chapter addresses the public life and leadership of women. Education and training dominate chapter 3. Health and childbearing are the topics of chapter 4 while housing, settlements, and the environment comprise chapter 5. The book concludes with a chapter on women's employment and the economy. The annexes include strategies for the advancement of women decided upon in Nairobi, Kenya in 1985, the text of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, and geographical groupings of countries and areas. During the 1990s, we must invest in women to realize equitable and sustainable development.
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  4. 4
    067602

    World AIDS Day 1991 -- sharing the challenge. HIV: a dangerously divisive virus.

    WORLD AIDS DAY NEWSLETTER. 1991 Jul; (1):1-4.

    This year's World AIDS Day, an annual observance day and a day to strengthen worldwide efforts to stop AIDS, will stress the need for forming partnerships in order to combat the disease. As this article explain, the AIDS pandemic has shown not only physical, but also psychological manifestations. AIDS has widened the divisions along race, sex, and social lines. For example, while in some countries prostitutes have been arrested on charges of being public health risks, their clients have not been imprisoned. Also, many groups considered to be high-risk -- like Haitians in the US -- have suffered reprisals from society at large. But as the article points out, ostracism and quarantine are inappropriate and cruel responses to AIDS, sine the disease spreads through deliberate human behavior (especially sexual behavior) and not ordinary behavior. Not only does ostracism of AIDS victims constitute human rights violations, it also works against controlling the spread of the disease. Those outside the stigmatized groups may consider themselves to be invulnerable to the disease. Furthermore, discrimination against HIV-infected people may discourage these individuals from contacting health and social services. The World Health Organization (WHO), the organizer of World AIDS Day, reports that in little over a decade, 8-10 million people worldwide have become infected with HIV, and that 1.5 million have developed AIDS. By the year 2000, WHO believes that the figures will rise to 30-40 million HIV cases and 10-15 million AIDS cases. In order to control the disease, it is necessary to end the isolation of groups and to form partnerships. Some of the most important partnerships, are between infected and noninfected people, between peers, and between men and women.
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  5. 5
    065187

    Equal rights for women and the United Nations Convention in Latin America.

    Plata MI

    INTER-AMERICAN PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT. BULLETIN. 1991 Jan; 8(1):1-3.

    Calling for renewed activity to ensure equality between men and women in Latin America, the author designates the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women as the legal standard for equality. Although all Latin American constitutions include provisions of equal rights for men and women, these countries still adhere to a patriarchal society. Cultural forces leave women in a subordinate position within the family, the workplace, education, and politics. Not only does the current economic crisis make it difficult to fund programs to improve the social conditions of women, many politicians have no sincere commitment to doing so. Nonetheless, all Latin American Countries have ratified the Convention (adopted in 1979), which recognizes the fundamental rights of women and provides a basis for international law. This principle calls for absolute equality between men and women, and requires that the signatories work towards achieving that goal. The signatories must incorporate the principle of equality in all government sectors and in all development plans. The Convention also requires governments to create a special office or ministry of women's affairs. This office is in charge of monitoring and promoting change to achieve the following: equal representation in government offices, equal participation in the workforce (including executive positions), an end to social and cultural stereotypes, and a guarantee of reproductive rights. Although many obstacles remain in the way of achieving equality, the Convention can serve as a tool for achieving that goal.
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