Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 2 Results

  1. 1
    068714

    Towards developing a community based monitoring system on the social and economic impact of AIDS in East and Central Africa.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Bureau for Programme Policy and Evaluation

    [Unpublished] 1991. 4, [1] p.

    Proposed is a short-term, initial study of the potential of a community-based system to monitor the social and economic impact of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Eastern and Central Africa. The study was requested by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP). Its initial phase, which will be conducted in the UK, will consist of a literature review and preparation of a proposal for a pilot project. Particular emphasis will be placed on poor households in which family survival is threatened by the death from AIDS of an economically active adult. Assessed will be the extent to which a community-based monitoring system can aid households and communities in coping with the excess mortality created by AIDS and also provide information to national leaders that can be used to guide the formulation of national AIDS policy. Components of such a monitoring system are the regular collection of data, processing of the data into a form where they can be used as the basis for initiating actions, and definition of a set of interventions. Such an activity assumes the existence of both institutions that can collect and process the data and agencies capable of initiating interventions. Examples of successful monitoring systems exist in the areas of food security and child malnutrition. Their success appears to have been based on the availability of data at the points where action is to be taken, involvement of existing community institutions, a convergence of community and external agency objectives, and a common perception of problems and their relative importance. The pilot project is expected to involve a small number of areas in one or two countries of East and Central Africa with a high incidence of AIDS.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    071576

    Ethiopia: providing child care within farmers' cooperatives.

    Haregot A

    In: Child care: meeting the needs of working mothers and their children, edited by Ann Leonard and Cassie Landers. New York, New York, SEEDS, 1991. 19-24. (SEEDS No. 13)

    In Ethiopia among the Melka Oba Farmers Producers' Cooperatives which are 120 km from Addis Ababa, child care was managed by the cooperative itself with the assistance of UNICEF and the Integrated Family Life Project (IFLE) interagency committee in 1983. Funding was used to employ a consultant to train child minders and establish the center, pay the cost of training, purchase resource materials for the training, equip the creche and kindergarten, and buy tools for construction of play items. A villa was donated to house the day care program. 8 child minders were selected for their interest in children and their educational level. Training was for 8 months. The child care center has flexible hours to accommodate working mothers and allows breast- feeding visits during the day. It is open to children aged 45 days-6 years, and includes a national preschool curriculum and immunization and health care services. As a byproduct of the center's activities, a family planning, health, and family life education program are operating. The evaluation in 1985 found that there were many reports of improved health among the children and less anxiety for the parents about child care. Production has increased and absenteeism has fallen. Pressure was applied successfully to obtain a local elementary school. A literacy program for adults was also begun. Of the problems encountered, the most difficult was persuading men, who felt that there was not a child care problem and that the women took care of it, to share in child care responsibilities. IFLE and UNICEF replicated the effort in Melka Oba within the Yetnora Agricultural Producer's Cooperative in Dejen, Gojjam Region. 12 lessons learned from this experience are identified: 1) child care needs must also take into account the interrelated needs of working mothers, infants and young children, and child care providers; 2) child care must be accessible, available during work hours, affordable, and trustworthy to mothers; 3) high quality care must have an appropriate curriculum; 4) local women should be trained as providers; 5) need is dependent on the child's age; 6) providers need payment and support; 7) community involvement increases commitment and learning; 8) byproducts are parent education and more schooling options for siblings; 9) teaching needs to be learner centered; 10) no 1 solution is best; 11) quality of care must be contextually judged by mothers and the community; and 12) political commitment is necessary.
    Add to my documents.