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  1. 1
    065732

    The sex and age distributions of population. The 1990 revision of the United Nations global population estimates and projections.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1991. viii, 391 p. (Population Studies No. 122; ST/ESA/SER.A/122)

    This statistical report includes the estimated and projected age distribution of the population based on high, medium, and low variants for 152 countries with populations greater than 300,000 between 1950 and 2025 in 5-year intervals. A world total as well as by continents and subregions are available along with the spatial groups; least developed countries, less developed regions (excluding China), the Economic Commission for Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia, and the Pacific, Western Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa. Grouped data reflect countries with populations both greater than and less than 300,000. This revision was begun in 1988 and completed in 1990 by the UN Population Division of the International Economic and Social Affairs Department in conjunction with other UN regional commissions and the Statistical Office. A discussion of methods and data used for these estimates, a summary of findings, and selected demographic indicators will be available in World Population Prospects, 1990, and in summary form in the UN World Population Chart, 1990. A magnetic tape and diskettes of these data are available on request for purchase.
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  2. 2
    069874

    Use and interpretation of pediatric anthropometry in epidemiologic studies.

    Sullivan K; Gorstein J; Trowbridge F; Yip R

    [Unpublished] 1991. Presented at the Society for Epidemiologic Research 24th Annual Meeting, Buffalo, New York, June 11-14, 1991. 12, [18] p.

    Health workers use anthropometry to determine the nutritional status of children. The accepted international growth reference curves provide the bases for the indices which include weight for height (W/H), height for age (H/A) and weight for age (W/A). Health workers must interpret these indices with caution, however. For example, W/H and H/A represent different physiological and biological processes while W/A combines the 2 processes. Further Z-scores, percentiles, or percent of median may be used as the scale for the indices and each scale has different statistical features. Specifically, Z-scores and percentiles acknowledge smoothed normalized distributions around the median, but the percent-of-median ignores the distribution around the median. Some researchers suggest using Z-scores rather than percentiles or percent-of-median since statisticians can interpret them more clearly and can calculate the proportion of children in the reference population who fall above or below a cut off point more easily. This cutoff should be only used to screen children who are likely to be malnourished since not all children below a cutoff are indeed malnourished. Some researchers have identified a leading limitation of the CDC/WHO based indices. A disjunction exists where the 2 smoothed based curves based on a population of <36 month old children from Ohio (longitudinal data) and another population of 2-18 year old children (cross sectional health surveys) meet. Further there is a reduction in age specific prevalences at 24 months. Thus some researchers recommend that anthropometry data be presented on an age specific basis, if age information is accurate. They further suggest that, if comparing data from different geographic areas, researchers should standardize age to have a summary measure. If age is not known the W/H summary measure should include 2 groups: <85 cm and =or+ 85 cm.
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  3. 3
    067006

    Recent findings on the consequences of rapid population growth in developing countries.

    Horlacher DE; Heligman L

    In: Consequences of rapid population growth in developing countries. Proceedings of the United Nations / Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques Expert Group Meeting, New York, 23-26 August 1988. New York, New York, Taylor and Francis, 1991. 345-77.

    Drawing from recent studies concerning the consequences of rapid population growth in developing countries, this paper argues against the common notion that population growth stands as a major obstacle for economic development in developing countries, emphasizing the complexity of demographic and economic interrelations. The studies discussed were presented at the UN Expert Group Meeting on Consequences of Rapid Population Growth in Developing Countries. The 1st section of the paper examines the prospects for continued population growth and its implication for the age structure of developing countries. Considering historical and current data, the 2nd section discusses inter country relations between population and economic growth rates, and how population growth affects such inter-country economic relations. The 3rd section examines the following sectoral issues: employment, savings rates, income distribution, and investment. While the 4th section considers the impact of population growth on resources and the environment, the 5th and 6th sections consider possible benefits of population growth. These possible benefits include bringing about economies of scale and hastening technical and institutional change. The 7th section examines the impact of population growth on kinship structures, and the 8th section considers a methodology for quantifying externalities resulting from population growth. Finally, the last section presents the conclusions of the UN Expert Group Meeting.
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  4. 4
    066515

    A new analysis of United Nations mortality statistics.

    Reading VM; Weale RA

    MECHANISMS OF AGEING AND DEVELOPMENT. 1991 Jan; 57(1):25-48.

    Demographic data published by the UN in 1987 are analyzed in terms of the Gompertz function. Projections for maximum lifespans are obtained, with the data broadly divisible into 3 clusters. These are attributable not only to the influence of high infant mortality, but suggest constitutional and/or environmental variations among members of the clusters. The difference between lifespan and life expectancy is estimated analytically. A comparison with earlier analysis supports the view that there are important differences between the life expectancies of the sexes.
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