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  1. 1
    273090

    Social studies and population education. Book Three: man in his environment.

    University of Sierra Leone. Institute of Education

    Freetown, Sierra Leone, Ministry of Education, 1984. 93 p. (UNFPA/UNESCO Project SIL/76/POI)

    The National Programme in Social Studies in Sierra Leone has created this textbook in the social sciences, with an emphasis on population education, for 2ndary school students. Unit 1, "Man's Origin, Development and Characteristics," describes Darwin's theory of evolution and explains how overproduction causes problems of rapid population growth and poor quality of life. Special attention is given to the problem of high infant mortality in Sierra Leone. Unit 2, "Man's Environment," discusses the interrelationships and interdependence among elements in the ecosystem, the food pyramid, and the effects of man's activities and numbers on the ecosystem. Unit 3, "Man's Culture," focuses on the processes of socialization and the different agents of socialization: the family, the group, the school, and the community. Unit 4, "Population and Resources," discusses human and natural resources as well as conservation measures. It also discusses the population composition, its effect on resources, and the uses and significance of population data. Unit 5, "Communication in the Service of Man," covers land, water and air transport; the effects of transport developments in Sierra Leone; and implications for population of changes in transport activities. Unit 6, "Global Issues: Achievements and Problems," deals with the young population, characteristics of the adolescent, common social problems among young people, and the role of the family unit. National and international action is also discussed.
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  2. 2
    273089

    Social studies and population education. Book Two: man in his environment.

    University of Sierra Leone. Institute of Education

    Freetown, Sierra Leone, Ministry of Education, 1984. 80 p. (UNFPA/UNESCO Project SIL/76/POI)

    The National Programme in Social Studies in Sierra Leone has created this textbook in the social sciences for secondary school students. Unit 1, "Man's Origins, Development and Characteristics," presents the findings of archaeologists and anthropologists about the different periods of man's development. Man's mental development and population growth are also considered. Unit 2, "Man's Environment," discusses the physical and social environments of Sierra Leone, putting emphasis on the history of migrations into Sierra Leone and the effects of migration on population growth. Unit 3, "Man's Culture," deals with cultural traits related to marriage and family structure, different religions of the world, and traditional beliefs and population issues. Unit 4, "Population and Resources," covers population distribution and density and the effects of migration on resources. The unit also discusses land as a resource and the effects of the land tenure system, as well as farming systems, family size and the role of women in farming communities. Unit 5, "Communication in the Service of Man", focuses on modern means of communication, especially mass media. Unit 6, "Global Issues: Achievements and Problems," discusses the identification of global issues, such as colonialism, the refugee problem, urbanization, and the population problems of towns and cities. The unit describes 4 organizations that have been formed in response to problems such as these: the UN, the Red Cross, the International Labor Organization, and the Co-operative for American Relief.
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  3. 3
    273088

    Social studies and population education. Book One: man in his environment.

    University of Sierra Leone. Institute of Education

    Freetown, Sierra Leone, Ministry of Education, 1984. 80 p. (UNFPA/UNESCO Project SIL/76/POI)

    The National Programme in Social Studies in Sierra Leone has created this text in social studies, with an emphasis on population education, for 2ndary school students. Unit 1, "Man's Origins, Development and Characteristics," covers traditional, religious and scientific explanations of man's origin; man's characteristics and the effects of these characteristics; and the beginnings of population growth and the characteristics of human population. In Unit 2, "Man's Environment," the word environment is defined and geographical concepts are introduced. Unit 3, "Man's Culture," defines institution and discusses family types, roles and cycles, as well as traditional ceremonies and cultural beliefs about family size. Unit 4, "Population and Resources," primarily deals with how the family meets its needs for food, shelter and clothing. It also covers the effects of population growth. Unit 5, "Communication in the Service of Man," discusses the means and growth of communication and collecting vital information about the population. The last unit defines global issues and discusses the interdependence of nations, issues affecting nations at the individual and world level, and the UN.
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  4. 4
    268446

    Report on the evaluation of CPR/80/P14: population education in the secondary schools and teachers training of the People's Republic of China.

    Jayasuria JE; Wayland SR; Swindells H

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1984 Nov. iv, 49 p.

    The objectives of the Population Education in Secondary Schools and Teachers Training of the People's Republic of China Projects were to provide the Chinese people, including young students, with the basic knowledge of population science and an understanding of why the Government considers family planning a fundamental national policy and why it is implementing the policy of controlling the number of the population and raising its quality. The 2 distinguishing features of this project are that the target group are middle school students rather than students of all grade levels, and that the existence of an established system for in-service training in the form of pedagogical institutes provides a fast and effective mechanism to introduce population education into the 2ndary school curriculum. The overall assessment of the Mission is that this project has been highly successful. The Mission's main recommendations are: 1) that the United Nations Fund for Population Activities and the Government increase their financial assistance; 2) future objectives be stated in terms that emphasize educational outcomes rather than operational tasks to permit objective monitoring and evaluation; 3) that a moratorium be place on the revision of population education curricula in order to concentrate on its diffusion; 4) that the posters and commentary be considered as a basis for instruction of junior middle school students as well as out-of-school youth and adults; 5) that questions on population content be included in the national examinations for university admission; 6) that a program for pre-service education in population education be initiated to supplement the in-service training; and 7) that substantial attention be given to different modes of training.
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  5. 5
    024779

    China-Vietnam: notes on population and the development of school programmes for population education.

    Fraser SE

    Comparative Education. 1984; 20(2):253-63.

    Recently introduced population education programs in the school cirriculum in China, a country with a vigorous population policy and in Viet Nam, a country with a less vigorous population policy, were described and compared. Although the 2 countries have vast demographic differences they both face the prospect of supporting large populations by the year 2000. Estimated annual growth rates are 1.4% for China and 2.2% for Vietnam. Both countries have considerable regional differences in growth patterns and both have large minority populations. Population policy in China emphasizes a 1-child family while current Viet Nam policy stresses a 2-child family. In China the male to female ratio was 106:100 in 1982 and Viet Nam the ratio was 94.2:100 in 1979. In 1979 both countries were about equal in the degree to which population issues were dealt with in the school curriculum. Since that time, China has developed and implemented a new and comprehensive population education curriculum while Viet Nam has only entered the planning stage for the development of a comprehensive program. Both countries are receiving assistance from the UN for Population Activities. Beginning in mid 1970, China instituted an unsystematic curriculum which stressed social hygiene, late marriage, and family planning, but in 1981 a comprehensive population education curriculum was developed for secondary students, and this curriculum is now being implemented on an experimental basis in selected schools in several cities. The course provides information on population theory, population growth, the relationship between population growth and modernization, birth control, and population planning. The Beijing Institute of Education is developing teaching materials for use in the courses. Its first publication was a 57 page textbook providing straight foward information on sexual intercourse and contraception. Viet Nam still lacks a systematically developed program. Despite opposition on the part of provincial authorities and some teachers, some attempts have been made to provide population information in a number of different disciplines in accordance with a thematic approach. Recently the Ministry of Education Commission on Population Education developed a plan for the administrative framework needed to develop a population education curriculum. The proposal includes the establishment of a National Population and Family Planning Commission to guide population activities. Only some of the recommendations of the Ministry of Education Commisson on Population Education have thus far been implemented.
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