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  1. 1
    037341

    Planning immunization activities.

    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]. Expanded Program on Immunization [EPI]; Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]. Expanded Program for Textbooks and Instructional Materials

    [Washington, D.C.], PAHO, [1980]. 36 p. (Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) Workshop Module IV)

    Upon completion of this module devoted to planning immunization activities, the participant will be able to explain the elements involved in planning immunization activities. Specific objectives include: to choose priorities among the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) diseases and vaccines; to choose the priority population groups for EPI: to gather essential information about the community to be provided with immunization services; to be able to make an inventory of resources needed in immunizations; to apply the technique of problem analysis and solution to the immunization program; to define different tactics for immunization activities; to be able to write quantitative objectives; and to estimate vaccine needs for a given population. The module covers: priority among geographic areas and people; location of health facilities in relation to the population to be served; problem analysis and solution; selection of immunization tactics; scheduling vaccination activities; setting quantitative objectives; and planning vaccine distribution.
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  2. 2
    802686

    Fictitia. [Training module]

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Programme for Control of Diarrhoeal Diseases

    [Geneva, WHO, 1980]. 19 p.

    As part of a series of training modules which form a course, the purpose of which is to train health care practitioners and deliverers how to effectively set up an in-country program for control of diarrheal disease, this module presents ficticious data (demographics and population characteristics) about a made-up developing nation, Fictitia. Further modules in this series train users how to order priorities in a diarrheal control program, how to focus on targets and sub-targets in the population and delivery system, how to design an effectively administered diarrheal disease control program, and how to evaluate any such program once implemented in an actual developing nation. Since diarrheal disease is 1 of the largest causes of morbidity and mortality among children under 5 in developing nations of this world, WHO created these training manuals as exercises, which would provide skills, upon course completion, applicable to an actual developing nation on earth.
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  3. 3
    265405

    Establishment of a regional network of health literature, library and information services (HELLIS).

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for South-East Asia

    New Delhi, WHO, South East Asia Region, May 1980. 117 p.

    Summary of intercountry consultative meeting of administrators, librarians, and users of health libraries from the Southeast Asia region called to consider the establishment of a network of health libraries and information services in the region. Discussion centers on strengthening of libraries at the national level to provide a base for linkage and permit integration into international information retrieval systems. The major outcome of the meeting was a proposal for the establishment of flexible regional and national networks functioning on the principle of resource sharing and Country focal points. A WHO Regional Coordinating Center would act as liaison between the national level and international organizations. The intended availability of these services to all levels of health personnel, and the equal partnership of all participants in the network are stressed. Assessment of user needs would be a necessary part of the development of the system. Appended to the report is a list of participants, the program, a list of the working papers, the inaugural address of Dr. V.T.H. Gunaratne to the 27 August 1979 meeting, country situation listings, a case study of library facilities in a group of city medical colleges, a student loan scheme, description of MEDLINE services in the region, and a proposed bibliographic control system for the area, as well as a listing of low priced recommended textbooks for students.
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  4. 4
    009661

    An attempt to improve health in a developing country: a case study.

    Sibley JC

    In: White KL, Bullock PJ, ed. The health of populations: a report of two Rockefeller Foundation conferences, March and May 1979. New York, Rockefeller Foundation, Sept. 1980. 139-44.

    The background, planning process, and structure of the McMaster University-Sierra Leone project are described and its progress after 1 year of operation is assessed. It was agreed that the University of Sierra Leone would establish a Department of Community Health in Freetown and would not develop a medical school, while the Ministry of Health would develop a paramedical training school. The Ministry of Health's mandatory 2-year training program for physicians educated abroad would have cooperative links with the Department of Community Health. A senior coordinating committee directly responsible to the president of Sierra Leone would be responsible for subsequent project planning. Establishment of an eduational base in the Department of Community Health is intended to develop expertise in clinical epidemiology, biostatistics, and related areas. Community-based continuing education programs for potential users of the new disciplines at district and chiefdom levels are planned. Considerable progress has been made in the first year, but some anticipated problems have arisen and some necessary local support has wavered. Experience with this project suggests that the size of external aid must be related to the potential for change rather than the health need; factors limiting potential for change may include government commitment, priority for health care, political stability, economic conditions, and societal acceptance. Planning should be flexible and iterative, and should consider recurring costs as well as initial development costs. Initial involvement at the community and village level is essential.
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