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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    273024

    Intermediating development assistance in health: prospects for organizing a public/private investment portfolio.

    Family Health

    Washington, D.C., Family Health, 1980 July 23. 162 p.

    The objective of this study is to identify and assess the potential role of intermediary organizations in furthering AID health assistance objectives. The 1st section of this report is an introduction to the potential roles of intermediaries through health assistance via the private voluntary community. A background of the private voluntary organizations is discussed along with some of the constraints that may impede their activity, such as competing interests, values and priorities. The following section defines what is and should be an intermediary organization along with examples of certain functions involved; a discussion of the experience of AID in the utilization of intermediaries follows. 3 models of utilization of intermediaries are analyzed according to the rationale involved, strategy, advantages and constraints. The 3rd section attempts to define and identify AID's needs for programming its health assistance in regard to primary health care, water and sanitation, disease control and health planning. A detailed analysis of the potential roles of intermediary organizations is discussed in reference to policy development, project development and design, project implementation, research, training and evaluation. The 4th section identifies the programming strengths and interests among listed private voluntary organizations in the US. The 5th section discusses the potential of intermediaries in health assistance in reference to the options for funding them in health and the constraints to direct AID funding of intermediary organizations. The last section discusses a series of recommendations made in regard to the development and funding of an international effort to marshall private resources in support of health assistance. Problems and constraints, as well as resources and opportunities, for the development of this international effort are further discussed.
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  2. 2
    002824

    Directories.

    UNESCO. Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania. Population Education Clearing House

    Bangkok, UNESCO Regional Office, 1980. 14 p. ([Building your population education collection] Booklet 3)

    Provides addresses of national population education projects, of other national organizations engaged in in- or out-of-school population activities in Asia and Oceania, and of international and United Nations agencies engaged in such activities.
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  3. 3
    035205

    Programmes and services on adolescent fertility and sexuality in ESEAOR.

    Catindig JB

    Concern. 1980 Jul-Sep; (18):1-2.

    The reproductive health needs and behavior of adolescents have been neglected by many health services until recently. The inclusion of adolescent fertility and sexuality in the East and South East Asian and Oceania regions of IPPF initially prompted uneasiness by workers who considered the inclusion of adolescents to be a sensitive issue given prevailing mores. The Singapore seminar/workshop on adolescent fertility and sexuality helped educate family planning workers and executives to the new realities of adolescent life, and many Family Planning Associations in the region made delivery of services to adolescents a major program emphasis. Family life education strategies have improved and IEC efforts are now geared to particular age and sociocultural groups. FPAs have stressed training of dormitory and hostel matrons and supervisors in counseling, adopted policies to "desensitize" the parents of teenage clients, and supported peer group counseling programs in order to deal with adolescent girls without violating the sociocultural norms of the community. The region's developing countries, particularly Indonesia, the Philippines, and Thailand, have large proportions of young people, and their governments welcome the initiatives of FPAs in providing programs and services.
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  4. 4
    263481

    Task force 11: decision-making and policy-making for voluntary sterilization.

    In: Schima ME, Lubell I, eds. Voluntary sterilization: a decade of achievement: proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Voluntary Sterilization, May 7-10, 1979, Seoul, Korea. New York, Association for Voluntary Sterilization, 1980. 76-7.

    The 22 participants in this task force, all senior government officials and ministers, recommended that efforts be made to repeal laws declaring sterilization illegal. Where no law proscribes sterilization it should be assumed that surgical contraception can be a component of family planning programs. Legal restrictions on eligibility for voluntary sterilization should also be lifted. The medical establishment and health professionals were viewed as vital to acceptance of voluntary sterilization by government decision makers. It was recommended that all governments be encouraged to establish national family planning programs with sterilization as a key component, and that recruitment and training be given top priority, preceding or occurring simultaneously with establishment and equipping of facilities. Training should take place within the country. Data collection, evaluation and management information systems were viewed as integral parts of all voluntary sterilization programs. Nongovernmental agencies were seen as initiators and catalysts that prompt governments to incorporate voluntary sterilization services in their family planning programs. Revision of the policies of international donors was recommended, to encourage rather than hamper the development and implementation of voluntary sterilization services.
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  5. 5
    800393

    Family planning in Mexico: a profile of the development of policies and programmes.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, IPPF, [1980]. 46 p.

    Mexican social, economic, and population indicators are discussed and tabulated. In 1972, the government, realizing the magnitude of the nation's population problem, reversed its previous antinatalist policy. The President acknowledged the individual's right to have family planning services available and the government's duty to provide family planning information. The Ministry of Health instituted a program to provide family planning services for that part of the population needing public services. A National Population Council was established to coordinate various public and private services active in the population field. Market research is being undertaken into the feasibility of government sponsored commercial distribution of contraceptives. Sterilization will be an integral part of the governmental family planning services. Acceptor targets and accomplishments and the budget for these governmentally-provided services are presented. A detailed discussion of the history and activities of the IPPF affiliate in Mexico is also presented. Despite the initially unfavorable atmosphere in the mid-1960s, FEPAC (Foundation for the Study of Population) was able to establish a network of family planning clinics. In addition to clinic programs, FEPAC carries out research, training, and education/information activities.
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  6. 6
    800102

    Drug policies for primary health care.

    WHO CHRONICLE. 1980; 34(1):20-3.

    In order to fulfill the goal of "health for all by the year 2000," the countries of Southeast Asia must be encouraged to establish comprehensive drug policies. This would remedy the present situation where access to life-saving drugs and essential drugs is limited and national health resources are wasted on less important medicines. The comprehensive drug policy could streamline every aspect of the pharmaceutical and supply system, ensuring high quality, safety and efficacy of the drugs. Each country's ministry of health should coordinate the program with aid from the WHO Regional Committee. Technical cooperation among the countries of the region is essential and establishment of eventual self-sufficiency with respect to essential drugs is encouraged. Traditional medicine and traditional medical practitioners should be integrated into the existing institutional system. Training of traditional practitioners in the preventive and promotive aspects of primary health care would improve the existing system. Since there is a lack of pharmacists in the region, the training of additional pharmacists should be a priority item in any new comprehensive drug program.
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