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  1. 1
    801433

    World Conference of the United Nations Decade for Women: equality, development and peace, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 14-30, 1980.

    United Nations Decade for Women. Secretariat

    New York, UN, 1980. 32 p. (A/CONF. 94/9)

    This report reviews and evaluates efforts at the national level to implement the world Plan of Action for the Implementation of the Implementation of the Objectives of the International Women's Year and is based on replies of 86 governments to questionnaires prepared by the Advancement of Women Branch in the Centre for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs. It contains an analysis of the progress made and obstacles overcome in the field of health. Using as indicators increases in female life expectancy and declines in maternal and infant mortality rates, improvements have occurred in the health status of women. However, wide disparities are seen between high and low socioeconomic groups, between rural and urban women, and between minority groups and the rest of the population. Lack of financial resources is a major obstacle, compounded by inflation. The excessive physical activity of working rural women not only precludes their participation in health programs but also adversely affects their health. Additional problems are inadequate training and supervision of health administrative personnel, a lack of defined policies, and a lack of coordination between agencies. Social, religious, and cultural attitudes that no longer have validity, lack of political commitment, and an inadequate perception of the long-term health benefits of family planning, rather than its demographic aspects, restrict access to family planning for many groups of women.
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  2. 2
    801374

    Study findings on evaluation of integrated family planning programme performance.

    ASIAN AND PACIFIC POPULATION PROGRAMME NEWS. 1980; 9(1-2):10-1.

    In 1976 the United Nations's Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific launched a comparative study on integrated family planning programs in a number of countries in the region. In November 1979 the study directors from the participating countries meet in Bangkok to discuss the current status of the studies in their countries. The Korean and Malaysian studies were completed, the Bangladesh study was in the data collecting phase, and the Pakistani research design phase was completed. The meeting participants focused their attention on the findings and policy implications of the 2 completed studies and also discussed a number of theorectical and methodological issues which grew out of their research experience. The Malaysian study indicated that group structure, financial resources, and the frequency and quality of worker-client contact were the most significant variables determining program effectiveness. In the Korean Study, leadership, financial resources, and the frequency and quality of contact between agencies were the key variables in determining program effectiveness. In the Malaysian study there was a positive correlation between maternal and child health service performance measures and family planning service performance measures. This finding supported the contention that these 2 types of service provision are not in conflict with each other but instead serve to reinforce each other. Policy implications of the Korean study were 1) family planning should be an integral part of all community activities; 2) family planning workers should be adequately supported by financial and supply allocations; and 3) adequate record keeping and information exchange procedures should be incorporated in the programs.
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  3. 3
    800359

    What we have learned about family planning in the Calabar Rural MCH/FP Project (Nigeria).

    Weiss E; Udo AA

    [Unpublished] 1980. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Denver, Colorado, April 10-12, 1980. 34 p.

    The Calabar Rural Maternal and Child Health/Family (MCH/FP) Project ran from July 1975 to December 1980 funded by the Cross River State Government Ministry of Health with assistance from the Population Council (New York) and the UN Fund for Population Activities. Calabar met the following requirements: it is rural; population between 200,000-500,000; family planning and maternal and child health is integrated from the top level of administration to the delivery of services to the clients; the target population is all women who deliver within the area and their children up to 5 years; services are at levels that can be expanded to larger areas of the country; and attention is given to evaluation of both health benefits and results of family planning services. As a model of health care delivery services to be used throughout the developing world, maternal health services are most important because the level of preventable deaths is highest in preschool children and in women at childbirth and MCH is the most appropriate an effective vehicle for introducing family planning. At the end of the Calabar Rural MCH/FP Project, the office will be closed but the services will continue under the direction of the local governments in Cross River State. 6 health centers and 1 hospital served 275 villages. Knowledge of contraception was low but positively associated with education.
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  4. 4
    800197

    Baby formula: the continuing controversy.

    Agenda. 1980 Mar; 3(2):8-11.

    Although the baby formula controversy continues, an important step toward resolving the issue was undertaken recently at an international conference of industry representatives, physicians, and nutritionalists, sponsored by WHO and UNICEF. At the conference, industry spokesmen agreed to ban all infant formula advertising which discourages breast-feeding and to ban all promotional activities in hospitals. Opponents pointed out that 1) the success of the ban is dependent on voluntary compliance and 2) the conference failed to address the issue of whether baby formulas were completely inappropriate for use in many developing countries. Conference participants also agreed 1) to stress the contraceptive value of breast-feeding; 2) to promote the use of contraceptives which do not interfere with lactation; 3) to promote nutritional education and the granting of longer maternity leaves to working women. In line with these recommendations AID has initiated a project aimed at helping countries expand and develop maternal health and nutritional program. As part of the project, AID will help the American Public Health Association develop a clearinghouse for infant and child nutritional information and will lend assistance to a number of organizations which plan to develop nutritional training programs. AID will also assist a number of organizations in their investigation of infant formula marketing practices and will help the Department of Agriculture develop and market local weaning foods.
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