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  1. 1
    006963

    Review of UNFPA's assistance to women, population and development projects (1969-March 1979).

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. Policy and Technical Division. Women and Youth Section

    New York, UNFPA, 1980 May. 64 p.

    This report reviews and analyzes the type of projects the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) has been supporting in the field of women, population, and development during the 1969-1979 period. After screening 180 projects for possible review from the almost 2000 projects funded by UNFPA between the 10 year period, 106 were selected because they satisfied the following criteria: they either addressed women specifically or women were the primary project focus. To follow the historical development in UNFPA funding of women's projects as well as to arrive at a descriptive overview, the 106 projects were analyzed in 2 different ways. For overview purposes they were divided into Direct Women's Projects (DWP)--68 items--and Indirect Women's Projects (IWP)--32 items. For the historical perspective, only the 68 DWPs were studied. These were separated into 3 groups: projects funded before the World Conferences on Population and Women in 1974 and 1975; projects funded during the conference years; and projects funded after the conferences. The overview, which included all 106 projects, revealed some noteworthy characteristics of the UNFPA funding process. DWPs were more likely to be designated "Status of Women" (54%) and to be more research oriented, and were more likely to be country specific. IWPs had no "Status of Women" projects, and were more training oriented (37%). From an historical perspective in analyzing only the 68 DWPs, the crucial turning point in UNFPA's funding of Women's Projects was the 2 World Conferences. Following the conferences, women funded projects increased to 47 from the preconference level of 17. This period's most salient feature was its emphasis on raising the awareness of women and communities. During the conference related period, several projects were funded principally to prepare data on women and to provide support services for the conferences. There was a shift to research-action combination projects during the post-conference period.
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  2. 2
    002467

    Population education in literacy. [Abstract-Bibliography]

    UNESCO. Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania. Population Education Clearing House

    In: UNESCO. Regional Office for Asia and Oceania. Population Education Clearing House. Population education as integrated into development programs: a non-formal approach. Bangkok, Thailand, UNESCO Regional Office for Asia and Oceania, 1980. 1-17. (Series 1, Pt. 4)

    The main theme of all the materials that were abstracted and reviewed in the area of population education in literacy is that literacy programs and population education in the non-formal setting must be linked with the real problems and needs of the people if they are to be effective. Highlighted in the abstracts presented are the strategies, guidelines, procedures and the processes used in making population education in literacy programs acceptable to the millions of illiterates, out-of-school youths and adults throughout the Asian region, who are preoccupied with satisfying their immediate needs for food and water. Two successful experimental functional literacy-population education projects carried out by the Adult Education Division of the Ministry of Education in Thailand and the Philippine Rural Reconstruction Movement are reported. Most of the documents reviewed have been both enhanced and enriched by the extensive work and experiences of the UNESCO Regional Office for Asia and Oceania and by the materials of the World Education which are a result of 18 years of practical field work in literacy.
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  3. 3
    002464

    National case studies on the out-of-school population education programs. [Abstract-Bibliography]

    UNESCO. Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania. Population Education Clearing House

    In: UNESCO. Regional Office for Asia and Oceania. Population Education Clearing House. Population education as integrated into development programs: a non-formal approach. Bangkok, Thailand, UNESCO Regional Office for Asia and Oceania, 1980. 1-14. (Series 1, Pt. 1)

    Abstracts of 8 national case studies on the out-of-school population education programs in the Asian countries of Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, the Republic of Korea, Pakistan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand are presented. Provided is the total picture and the framework upon which the population education in the out-of-school sector in these countries are being conducted. The case studies show that the majority of the out-of-school population education programs have developed by means of a process of evolution rather than as a result of strict systematic planning. To some extent this evolution has been facilitated by several governmental and nongovernmental organizations which initiated the integration of population education into their own development oriented programs such as welfare, literacy, agriculture and labor. The objectives and activities for out-of-school population education have become an organic part of the development programs, many of which are family planning oriented. This situation has brought some confusion regarding how to define population education in the out-of-school sector and what its boundaries are.
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  4. 4
    009891

    Health and development: a selection of lectures and addresses.

    Quenum CA

    Brazzaville, Congo, World Health Organization, Regional Office for Africa, 1980. 86 p. (Health Development in Africa 1)

    Primary health care has been accepted by the 44 Member States and Territories of the African Region of the World Health Organization (WHO); the Health Charter for 1975-2000 was adopted in 1974 with its humanistic approach oriented to satisfying basic needs. Genuine technical cooperation between Member States is essential for health development and can be achieved on the regional level. By 1990 the following steps should be taken: 1) vaccination of all infants under 1 year against measles, pertussis, tetanus, poliomyelitis, diphtheria and tuberculosis, 2) supply of drinking water to all communities and 3) waging a war on hunger. Health development is seen as a social development policy requiring combined efforts in the fields of education, agriculture, transport, planning, economics, and finance as well as a national strategy which WHO can help to define. A new international economic order must aim at meeting basic needs of the poorest in the population and includes health needs. Basic health services must provide primary health care which includes preventive and curative care, promotional and rehabilitative care, maternal and child health, sanitation, health education, and systematic immunization. Secondary care includes outpatient services with specialized teams; tertiary care provides highly specialized services. These services must be geographically, financially, and culturally accessible to the community. Communication between health workers and community leaders is fundamental in setting up those services and group dynamics can be utilized in promoting change. WHO's 4 health priorities in Africa are: 1) epidemiological surveillance, 2) promotion of environmental health, 3) integrated development of health manpower and services, and 4) health development research promotion. The components of Africa's health care program are: 1) community education, 2) promotion of food supply and nutrition, 3) safe water and sanitation, 4) maternal and child health, 5) immunization, 6) disease prevention, 7) treatment of injuries and diseases and 8) provision of essential drugs. Proper training of personnel is crucial for the success of these steps, along with effective personnel management.
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  5. 5
    003398

    Kenya: fueling the women's movement.

    Rowley J

    People. 1980; 8(3):18-20.

    In Kenya there are now 10,000 women's groups which are officially registered by the government and thus eligible for assistance from the Women's Bureau. A visit to the local group of 60 women in Kambu provides an example of both the courage and the potential of these groups. Initiated in 1976, the group's 1st effort was to plant coffee trees for each member. The next activity was making pottery and growing vegetables and meeting every Thursday afternoon. In 1979 the group applied to the Women's Bureau for assistance and was given over $1,000 to build a pigsty and buy some pigs. This was followed by a shop built for 6,000 shillings from which to sell the sisal baskets and mats which the group makes. The current objective is to raise about 30,000 shillings for a meeting hall, with a store, office and canteen. Family planning was not at the forefront of this group's activities. Nyeri, 1 of the best developed districts in Kenya, is also the site for the 1 experimental project where family planning information and services have been introduced simultaneously with income generating activities to several women's groups. The objective is 3-fold: to promote family planning by integrating it with other activities from the start of the project; to include voluntary motivational work by members of the groups; and to improve the status of members. 10 groups are involved in the project, part of the International Planned Parenthood Federation's worldwide program for Planned Parenthood and World Development. After 1 year of operation, family planning practice had increased markedly, with over 70% of women under 45 using contraceptives in 3 of the villages. There was much evidence showing that many members were actively promoting the family planning idea among their friends and neighbors. The integration of activities has been shown to have increased family planning acceptance. The problem is that with over 5000 requests for help in 1981, The Women's Bureau is only able to provide resources to some 600. At present, the Women's Bureau only has $1 million to spend.
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