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Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    209242

    [Supplement on bibliographical services throughout the world in 1978] Supplement sur les services bibliographiques dans le monde en 1978; Suplemento relativo a los servicios bibliograficos en el mundo en 1978.

    UNISIST

    General Information Programme--Unisist Newsletter. 1980; (Annual Suppl):1-102.

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  2. 2
    196579

    [Directory of United Nations information systems] Repertoire des systems d'information des Nations Unies; Directorio de sistemas de information de las Naciones Unidas.

    United Nations. Interorganization Board for Information Systems

    Geneva, Switz., U.N. Inter-Organization Board for Information Systems, 1980.

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  3. 3
    046748

    Smallpox eradication.

    Henderson DA

    PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS. 1980 Sep-Oct; 95(5):422-6.

    The implications of the eradication of smallpox in the context of epidemiology are presented. Eradication of disease has been conceived since the 1st smallpox vaccination was developed in the 18th century. Since then, attempts to eradicate yellow fever, malaria, yaws and smallpox have been instituted. Most public health professionals have been rightfully skeptical. Indeed, the success with smallpox was fortuitous and achieved only by a narrow margin. It is unlikely that any other disease will be eradicated, lacking the perfect epidemiological characteristics and affordable technology. The key to success with smallpox was the principle of surveillance. This concept has a vigorous developmental history in the discipline of epidemiology, derived from the work of Langmuir and Farr. It involves meticulous data collection, analysis, appropriate action and evaluation. In the case of smallpox, only these techniques permitted the key observations that smallpox vaccination was remarkably durable, and that effective reporting was fundamental for success. The currently popular goal of health for all, through horizontal programs, is contrary to the methods of epidemiology because its objective is vague and meaningless, no specific management structure is envisioned, and no system of surveillance and assessment is in place.
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  4. 4
    038504

    [Smallpox eradication] Certification de l'eradication de la variole

    Weekly Epidemiological Record / Releve Epidemiologique Hebdomadaire. 1980 Feb 1; 55(5):33-4.

    At its final meeting in December 1979, the Global Commission for the Certification of Smallpox Eradication concluded that smallpox eradication has been achieved on a worldwide basis and there is no evidence that smallpox will return as an endemic disease. The 65th session of the WHO's Executive Board, held on January 25, 1980, endorsed these conclusions and made 19 recommendations covering the areas of vaccination policy, reserve stocks of vaccine, investigation of suspected smallpox cases, laboratories retaining variola virus stocks, human monkeypox, laboratory investigations, documentation of the smallpox eradication program, and WHO headquarters staff. Sufficient freeze-dried smallpox vaccine to vaccinate 200 million people will be maintained by WHO in refrigerated depots in 2 countries. WHO will ensure that appropriate publications are produced describing smallpox and its eradication, with special emphasis on the principles and methods that are applicable to other programs.
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  5. 5
    268455

    Health for all by the year 2000: strategies.

    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]

    Washington, D.C., Regional Office of the World Health Organization, 1980. x, 189 p. (Official Document No. 173)

    The World Health Assembly decided in 1977 that the main social target of the Governments and the WHO in the decades ahead should be "the attainment by all the citizens of the world by the year 2000 of a level of health that will permit them to lead a socially and economically productive life." Subsequently, the World Health Assembly in 1979 urged the member states to define and implement national, regional, and global strategies for attaining the goal of health for all by the year 2000. This monograph reprints UN documents dealing with this goal. The 1st document addresses 2 specific issues, the developments in the health sector in the 1971-1980 decade, and strategies for attaining the goal of health for all by the year 2000. The 2nd document addresses 8 areas of interest; 1) social and environmental aspects of the region of the Americas; 2) evaluation of the 10-year health plan for the Americas; 3) implications of the goal and the new international economic order for the achievement of the objectives; 4) a method for analyzing strategies and developing a primary health care work plan and indicators for evaluating progress towards the goal; 5) objectives for the health and social sectors; 6) regional baseline targets for priority health conditions; 7) summary of revised regional strategies for attaining the goal; 8) national, intercountry, regional, and global implications of the regional strategies. The 3rd and 4th documents are resolutions 20 and 21 of the 27th meeting of the directing council of the Pan American Health Organization. Resolution 20 addresses regional strategies for attaining the goal. Resolution 21 discusses the ad hoc working group to complement the regional strategies.
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  6. 6
    199274

    Family Planning International Assistance annual report, program year 9, 1979-1980.

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America [PPFA]. Family Planning International Assistance [FPIA]

    New York, N.Y., Family Planning International Assistance, International Division of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, 1980. 157 p.

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  7. 7
    199271

    World Bank annual report, 1980.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1980. 200 p.

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  8. 8
    204028

    Review of 1979 WHO activities in the field of health statistics and related areas.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switz., World Health Organization, 1980. 50 p.

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  9. 9
    203907

    Population and world resources.

    Sinclair G

    Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs. 1980 Apr; (278):161-166.

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  10. 10
    008024

    World development report 1980.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1980 Aug. 166 p.

    This report examines some of the difficulties and prospects faced by developing countries in continuing their social and economic development and tackling poverty for the next 5-10 years. The 1st part of the report is about the economic policy choices facing both developing and richer countries and about the implications of these choices for growth. The 2nd part of the report reviews other ways to reduce poverty such as focusing on human development (education and training, health and nutrition, and fertility reduction). Throughout the report economic projections for developing countries have been carried out, drawing on the World Bank's analysis of what determines country and regional growth. Oil-exporting countries will face greater economic growth; their average GNP per person could grow 3-3.5% in the 1980s. Oil-importing countries will develop slower or fall to 1.8%/year. Poverty in oil-importing developing countries could grow at about 2.4% GNP/person and by 1990 there would be 80 million fewer people in absolute poverty. Factors which will contribute to the economic problems of developing countries are trade (import/export), energy, and capital flow. The progress of developing countries depends on internal policies and initiatives concerning investment and production efficiency, human development and population. Not only can human development increase growth but it can help to reduce absolute poverty.
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  11. 11
    801947

    Bucharest and after

    Hofsten E

    In: Poverty and population control, edited by Lars Bondestam and Staffan Bergstrom. Academic Press, London, England, 1980. 213-221.

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