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  1. 1
    374700

    Safer women, safer world: a fund to increase the number of women UN Peacekeepers and better protect women and girls in conflict situations.

    Kenny C

    Washington, D.C., Center for Global Development, 2017 Jun. 4 p. (Center for Global Development Brief)

    Having more women peacekeepers is linked with large reductions in sexual misconduct by peacekeepers and more sustainable peace. The UN could potentially raise the proportion of women peacekeepers to 20 percent for around $75 million. A small multilateral trust fund would offer supplementary payments to troop-contributing countries for each woman peacekeeper provided.
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  2. 2
    321694

    Panel 4. Introductory remarks.

    McDougall G

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 5 p.

    When wars occur, women are usually the most abused, aggrieved and powerless. In the vast majority of countries, women play no significant role in the decision-making process of whether war is warranted or lawful. When hostilities break out, women are exposed not only to the forms of violence and devastation that accompany any war but also to forms of violence directed specifically at women on account of their gender. The use of sexual violence and sexual slavery as tactics and weapons of war remains at a high level in spite of tremendous strides made by the global community over the past decade. It is imperative to acknowledge the immeasurable injury to body, mind and spirit that is inflicted by these acts. The overall deterioration in the conditions of women in armed conflict situations is due not only to the collapse of social restraints and the general mayhem that armed conflict causes, but also to a strategic decision on the part of combatants to intimidate and destroy the enemy as a whole byraping and enslaving women who are identified as members of the other warring party. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    320737

    AIDS fighter. Liberia.

    United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Office of the Special Adviser on Gender Issues and Advancement of Women [OSAGI]

    New York, New York, OSAGI, [2004]. [2] p.

    Her name is Joyce Puta, a 48-year-old Zambian army colonel on secondment to the United Nations. An unabashed fighter, her enemy for the last ten years has been HIV/AIDS. Her latest battleground is Liberia, and by all accounts she has been waging a successful campaign. Working with the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL), Colonel Puta points out that any environment requiring peacekeepers is also a risky one for the spread of HIV/AIDS. In post-conflict situations, social structures crumble and economies are unstable. In order to survive, desperate young women may turn to commercial sex work, often around military bases. So how did a career Zambian army officer find herself on the frontlines in the fight against HIV/AIDS? Joyce Puta joined the army at eighteen. Six years later she became a registered nurse and midwife, and then nursing services manager for Zambia's main military hospital. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    303037

    On the front line: a review of policies and programmes to address HIV / AIDS among peacekeepers and uniformed services.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Copenhagen, Denmark, UNAIDS, Office on AIDS, Security and Humanitarian Response, 2003 Aug. [31] p. (UNAIDS Series: Engaging Uniformed Services in the Fight against HIV / AIDS; UNAIDS/03.44E)

    This initiative focuses on mitigating the impact of HIV/AIDS in three core areas: International security, with the focus on supporting HIV/AIDS interventions within United Nations peacekeeping operations; National security, targeting uniformed services with particular emphasis on young recruits, future peacekeepers and demobilizing personnel; Humanitarian response, which focuses on vulnerable populations in crisis settings and humanitarian workers. As part of its national security initiative, UNAIDS SHR, in collaboration with UN Theme Groups, is providing support to countries for the development and/or strengthening of national responses targeting national uniformed services and, in particular, young recruits, demobilized personnel and peacekeepers. Approximately 45 countries worldwide are currently supported through the Initiative on HIV/AIDS and Security. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    303298

    Fighting AIDS: HIV / STI prevention and care activities in a military and peacekeeping setting in Ukraine. Country report.

    Khodakevich L

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], Office on AIDS, Security and Humanitarian Response, 2004 Feb. 43 p. (UNAIDS Series: Engaging Uniformed Services in the Fight against AIDS. Case Study 2.)

    Ukraine has one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in Eastern Europe. It was first in the region to face an aggressive epidemic among injecting drug users in 1995, and the epidemic now appears to have entered a more generalized phase. The Government of Ukraine responded to HIV at an early stage. Several Presidential Decrees urged the Government to initiate and enhance activities against the epidemics, and mobilize various ministries including the Ministry of Defence. In June 1999 the heads of the Educational Branch in the Preventive Medicine Department of the Ministry of Defence (MoD) met with UNAIDS officials and discussed HIV/AIDS issues in the Ukrainian army. The meeting resulted in an agreement to launch a project on prevention of HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Ukraine's armed forces. Funds and technical support were provided by UNAIDS, and the Main Educational Department started implementation of the project with the assistance of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). The project focused on the development of training and educational materials, integration of education about HIV/STI prevention in the curricula of the Humanitarian Institute of the National Academy of Defence and the Kharkiv Tank Forces Institute, and on cascade training (cascading information down to all levels of rank and file) of the officers and soldiers in five field garrisons. Around 20,000 servicemen were trained in the first phase. The second phase of the project will run to early 2004 and the army headquarters are applying for resources from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and AIDS in order to strengthen these activities. During the second phase of the project 350,000 servicemen are to be targeted with comprehensive information and education relating to HIV/AIDS and STIs. (excerpt)
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