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  1. 1
    131900

    Data processing for demographic censuses and surveys with special emphasis on methods applicable to developing country environments.

    Dekker A

    The Hague, Netherlands, Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute [NIDI], 1997. [6], 88 p. (NIDI Report No. 51)

    This report presents new and enhanced methodological and technological methods for improving quality and controlling costs in census taking and demographic surveys in developing countries. Chapter 1 is devoted to describing the computer environment for the processing of data. Chapter 2 discusses the planning, logistics, and management of surveys and censuses. Chapter 3 discusses data processing support for field activities, such as management of address lists and computerized mapping. Chapters 4 and 5 review office-based tasks such as coding and data entry, optical mark reading, optical character reading and image scanning, and data entry equipment requirements. Chapter 6 focuses on data editing with computers, imputation methods, and a master file for tabulation. Chapter 7 identifies tabulation methods. Chapter 8 describes the post-enumeration survey. Chapter 9 describes demographic data bases for micro and macro data and table-oriented and time-series data bases. Chapter 10 describes dissemination methods, such as printed reports, magnetic media, and on-line and batch on-demand aggregation. Chapter 11 describes potential uses of data from censuses and surveys. Chapter 12 describes requirements for physical infrastructure, data processing equipment, human resources, and technical information. Chapter 13 is a brief conclusion. The annex provides a list of noncommercial software for processing data. Perhaps the most important physical facilities are an adequate continuous electric power supply and related equipment (an internal battery for saving data before shutdown).
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  2. 2
    047734

    Making do with less: the 1990 round of censuses in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Crowley JG; Hardee-Cleaveland K

    [Unpublished] 1988. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, New Orleans, Louisiana, April 21-23, 1988. [3], 23, [3] p.

    For sub-Saharan countries, population censuses are crucial in obtaining data about local areas, sociodemographic characteristics, and input for development and policy making. Most sub-Saharan countries cannot afford to fund censuses, and external assistance has been provided by UNFPA, the US, the United Kingdom, and France. The World Bank has recently become involved in supporting census work, and coordination between all these groups is critical. 5 critical areas for making effective use of scarce resources are: country commitment; improved donor coordination; management and planning; institutionalization of census capabilities; and improvement of production, dissemination, and use of census data. Country commitment is affected by fund shortages, and political sensitivities. Census work should depend on agricultural seasons, the school year, and migratory movements. Donor coordination in the areas of funding, data analysis, and technical assistance is important. Planning for future censuses should begin 2-3 years before the actual census date, and management of the census should include short-term training and technical assistance from donor countries. The institutionalization of census activities should address the weakest link in census work--data processing. Lengthy delays in processing data because of nonstandardized equipment, limited access, and lack of skilled personnel have hampered census efforts. A fully configured microcomputer system would also address this problem. Publication and dissemination of census data, sometimes delayed as much as 8 years, could be improved by the use of timely microcomputer reports of preliminary results. Attention to these 5 key areas will improve the 1990 round of censuses, and efficiently use the limited resources available.
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  3. 3
    266778

    Population information activities of the ESCAP Population Division Clearing-House and Information Section.

    Leoprapai B; Olson L; Amritmahal GR; Israngkura S; Balasingam M; Aziz S; Yoo JK

    In: Thailand. Ministry of Public Health. National Family Planning Programme. Thai Population Clearing House/Documentation Centre In-service training on population/family planning information system, 19 May-9 July 1981, Bangkok. Bangkok, Thailand, Ministry of Public Health, National Family Planning Programme, Thai Population Clearing House/Documentation Centre, [1981?]. 10-24. (ASEAN Australian Project No. 3 Developing/Strengthening National Population Information Systems and Networks in ASEAN Countries: Thailand)

    The main function of the ESCAP Population Division Clearing House and Information Section is the collection, building, and dissemination of population information is ESCAP member countries. Objectives include the development of an improved information exchange system, and the stimulation of the information component of the population infrastructure. Technical assistance and training are provided at the request of governments. The population correspondents' network has been restructured in order to improve its effectiveness as an instrument in strengthening population programs. Documents are being translated into English and local languages. The Reference Centre provides a number of services, including: retrospective searching, document delivery, current awareness, annotation of bibliographies, and consultation. Publications emanating from the Clearing House are designed to keep agencies informed of program developments and reports of regional meetings and research studies. Selective dissemination of information (SDI) is conducted by the Dissemination Unit of the Section. Other Clearing House activities include the evaluation of current awareness services, and the compilation of an inventory of current research on mortality and family planning. Automation of many of these functions is now taking place; the compatibility of information programs with each other, both among nations and among UN organizations, is a future goal.
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