Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 17 Results

  1. 1
    327448

    Strengthening the Education Sector Response to HIV and AIDS in the Caribbean. UNESCO / WB partnership in support of CARICOM strategy in education and HIV and AIDS.

    Bundy DA; Fontani P; Ruiz Devesa D; O'Connell TE; Babb J

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2007 Dec 14. 29 p.

    This report presents the findings and outcomes of the three joint UNESCO/WB missions to Guyana, Jamaica and St. Lucia, and elaborates on next steps identified for action at both national and regional levels. The report also sets these findings and next steps within the broader context of the Caribbean plan for action and presents in its appendices, sample resources to guide the development of a comprehensive response to HIV & AIDS by the education sector.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    326030

    Workshop report: Appraising HIV / AIDS Prevention Curricular Materials and Teaching-Learning Resources, Geneva, Switzerland, 9-11 June 2003.

    UNESCO. International Bureau of Education

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNESCO, International Bureau of Education, 2003 Jul 14. 11 p. (IBE/2003/RP/HV/01)

    The IBE organized this workshop as part of UNESCO's common effort to make existing curriculum documents and teaching-learning materials for HIV/AIDS education easily accessible, and to identify and disseminate good practices and lessons learned, with the aim of improving the overall success of education as principal means of combating the epidemic. Three objectives have been identified for this workshop: discuss and improve the set of appraisal criteria prepared by the IBE to assess curricular materials and teaching-learning resources for HIV/AIDS prevention in schools; apply the proposed appraisal criterial to analyze concrete curriculum materials and teaching learning resources brought by the participants and identify good practices and lessons learned; formulate follow-up actions and recommendations for future collaboration among participants for identification and promotion of promising approaches and good practice. Presentations of the participants the first day and discussions on important issues and challenges that the education sector faces in designing and implementing HIV/AIDS prevention in schools provided valuable information, but also crucial questions on how to continue the work. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    313141

    Joint ILO / UNESCO Caribbean Sub-Regional Workshop: Improving Responses to HIV / AIDS in Education Sector Workplaces. Report. September 28-30, 2005, Hilton Kingston Hotel, Jamaica.

    Budhlall P

    Geneva, Switzerland, International Labour Organization [ILO], 2006. [44] p.

    The workshop was organized under the auspices of an ILO-initiated programme during 2004-2005 to enhance a sectoral approach to HIV/AIDS education sector workplaces, as a complement to the ILO?s Code of Practice on HIV/AIDS in the world of work, adopted in 2001. A number of research papers and assessments prepared by international organizations in recent years have highlighted the vulnerability of education sector workers, foremost teachers, who are considered to be highly susceptible to HIV and AIDS infection in developing countries. The high prevalence, disability and mortality rates among these personnel in turn deprive affected countries of some of their most educated and skilled human resources. Moreover, teachers are often not trained or supported to deal with the HIV/AIDS crisis within schools, and the disease has also affected the management capacity of education systems to respond to mounting crises. In 2005, UNESCO joined forces with the ILO to spearhead the development of an HIV and AIDSworkplace strategy for the Caribbean which has as its objective the development of a model workplace policy and related resource materials for use by education staff and stakeholders at national and institutional levels of a nation?s education system. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    313139

    Joint ILO / UNESCO Southern African Subregional Workshop, 30 November - 2 December 2005, Maputo, Mozambique. Improving responses to HIV / AIDS in education sector workplaces. Report.

    International Labour Organization [ILO]; UNESCO

    Geneva, Switzerland, ILO, 2006. 63 p.

    The workshop was organized under the auspices of an ILO programme initiated in 2004, developing a sectoral approach to HIV/AIDS education sector workplaces, as a complement to the ILO's code of practice HIV/AIDS and the world of work, adopted in 2001. A number of research papers and assessments prepared by international organizations in recent years have highlighted the impact of HIV and AIDS on the education sector workforce in developing countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. High prevalence results in morbidity and mortality rates which deprive affected countries of some of their most educated and skilled human resources. In addition, teachers are often not trained or supported to deal with HIV in schools, and the disease has also affected the management capacity of education systems. In 2005, UNESCO joined the ILO in a collaborative project, aimed at the development of an HIV and AIDS workplace policy and related resource materials for use by education staff and stakeholders at national and institutional levels in southern African countries. The workshop in Maputo brought together representatives of government (ministries of labour and education), employer organizations and teacher/educator unions from seven countries to participate in this process, along with representatives of regional and international organizations (see Appendix 1 for list of participants). (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    313132

    Forms and patterns of social discrimination in Nepal: a report.

    Pandey TR; Mishra S; Chemjong D; Pokhrel S; Rawal N

    Kathmandu, Nepal, UNESCO, 2006. [126] p. (UNESCO Kathmandu Series of Monographs and Working Papers No. 8; KAT-SHS-2006/01)

    Socio-cultural diversity is one of the important features of Nepalese society. Its people are categorized into a number of caste groups as well as ethnic communities. They possess different types of cultural traditions and assume different levels of economic standing. In view of these diversities, public debates in Nepal have raised the issue that these different types of social categories share the opportunities and privileges available in this society differentially. Given this, this report aims to: highlight the existing forms and patterns of social discrimination experienced by people of Nepal, as they occur, on the grounds of their caste, ethnicity, gender, and religion-based identities, draw attention to the difference types of social discrimination experienced by people of the aforementioned social categories, and discover the variations of social discrimination among people, as they occur, in terms of their class-based position within these social categories. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    297792

    If only. Zambia.

    Mangoye VL

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2004 Jul. 15 p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of workshops supported by UNESCO and UNFPA. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and medial professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessment of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine-tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    297791

    Arrange my marriage, arrange my death. Zambia.

    Phiri S

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2004 Jul. 13 p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of workshops supported by UNESCO and UNFPA. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and medial professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessment of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine-tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    297490

    UNESCO's commitment to youth: the Youth Forum.

    UNESCO. Bureau of Strategic Planning. Section for Youth

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Bureau of Strategic Planning, Section for Youth, 2004. [40] p. (BSP.2004/YTH/001)

    UNESCO's involvement in the field of youth stems from the creation of the organization in 1946. After the Second World War, UNESCO (with only 20 Member States at that time) helped organize international volunteer youth work camps to aid in the reconstruction of Europe. Almost fifty years later in November 1996, 186 Member States at the 29th Session of the UNESCO General Conference reaffirmed and stressed their unanimous commitment to youth as a priority for the whole Organisation. The current policy, i.e. the promotion of 'youth' as a mainstreaming issue of the Organisation in all its activities, is guided by the World Action Programme for Youth to the year 2000 and beyond, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1995. It has also been inspired and informed by a number of recommendations, declarations and plans of actions of diverse regional and international youth meetings and forums held in recent years. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    297487

    School for girls: creating equal opportunity.

    Sharma Y

    New Courier. 2005 Nov; 5-6.

    Many ministry staff battling to improve girls' education in Asia are highly motivated but isolated within their own countries, as their governments barely acknowledge the importance of "mainstreaming" gender issues into all aspects of policy. "Oft en officials say we don't have gender problems because all girls are in school but in terms of equality and opportunities there are many problems," says Ochirkhuyag Gankhuyag, from UNESCO's Bangkok bureau. Girls must not only be given the chance to finish school, they must be able to get jobs without facing discrimination, he says. The UN's Gender in Education Network in Asia (GENIA) programme was launched in 2002 to provide support and training to those who can make a difference. Based in Bangkok, GENIA identified "Gender Focal Points" (GFPs) - ministry of education officials responsible for promoting equality - in 11 Asian countries* and organises workshops for them so that they can learn from each other. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    297483

    Raising the curtain on AIDS. [Lever le voile sur le sida]

    Bonkoungou M

    New Courier. 2005 May; 44-46.

    In the market square of Manga, a town located 105 kilometres east of Ouagadougou, vendors close their shops one after another as the sun dips lower. In the middle of cabarets selling dolo, the local millet beer, the troupe from the Burkinabe Theatre Workshop (ATB) starts setting up its performance area in front of an impatient crowd. In next to no time, the stage is set. The evening's show: The Cough of the Serpent, a play to heighten awareness of tuberculosis - an illness often linked to HIV/AIDS - that is being presented at the request of the National Tuberculosis Programme and the regional health authority. At the start of the play, a malfunctioning microphone prompts vocal protests from the audience members. And they continue to make their presence felt throughout the performance. Spectators shout out their disapproval of a "patient" who refuses to follow his treatment properly, or respond to questions from the actors, who keep them involved. At the end of the rowdy show, queries fly from all sides. The actors, joined by healthcare professionals, answer them. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    282153

    Open your eyes or be blind forever. Namibia.

    Ashipala-Hako AN

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Division of Basic Education, Literacy and Non-Formal Education Section, 2003 Sep. [25] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social, cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    282151

    The wicked healer. Namibia.

    Shatilweh RN

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Division of Basic Education, Literacy and Non-Formal Education Section, 2003 Jul. [18] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops partially funded by the Danish Development Agency (DANIDA). The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is a health as well as a social, cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    282150

    Take care of those you love. Namibia.

    Asino E

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Division of Basic Education, Literacy and Non-Formal Education Section, 2003 Sep. [13] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social, cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    195832

    Home, the best medicine, Zimbabwe.

    Matende F

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2001 Oct. [14] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops partially funded by the Danish Development Agency (DANIDA). The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. The booklets address a wide-range of issues normally not included in materials for HIV/AIDS such as the secondary status of girls and women in the family, the "sugar daddy" phenomenon, wife inheritance, the hyena practice, traditional medicinal practices superstitions, home-based care and living positively with AIDS. They have one thing in common- they influence greatly a person's safety from contracting HIV/AIDS. We hope that these booklets will inspire readers to reflect on some of life's common situations, problems and issues that ordinary women and men face in their day-to-day relationships. In so doing, they might reach a conclusion that the responsibility is theirs to save their own lives and those of their loved ones from HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    195834

    Me, you and AIDS. Kenya. A product of a UNESCO-DANIDA workshop for preparation of post-literacy materials and radio programmes for women and girls in Africa.

    Nyingi P

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2000 Jan. [24] p.

    Though the booklets are intended for use with neo-literate women and out-of-school girls, the messages in the stories and the radio programme scripts that accompany them are also relevant for use as supplementary reading materials in formal schools for readers of both sexes. The subjects of the booklets, based on the needs assessments, reflect a wide range of needs and conditions of African women - from Senegal to Kenya, from Mali to South Africa, from Niger to Malawi. A list of common concerns has emerged. These include: HIV-AIDS, domestic violence, the exploitation of girls employed as domestic servants, the lack of positive role models for women and girls, the economic potential of women through small business development, the negative consequences of child marriage, and the need for a more equal division of labour between men and women in the home. Each booklet describes one way of treating a subject of high priority to African women. In the process, the authors have attempted to render the material gender-sensitive. They have tried to present African women and girls and their families in the African context and view the issues and problems from their perspective. We hope these booklets will inspire readers, as they did their authors, to reflect on some of life's common situations, problems and issues that ordinary women and men face every day. The questions accompanying each booklet will help readers ask questions and find answers to some of the issues which also touch their own lives. How the characters in these booklets cope with specific situations, their trials and tribulations, can serve as lessons for women and men living together in 21st Century Africa. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    195820

    Prevention of HIV / AIDS and Drug Abuse. Final report of the regional workshop, Beijing, 25-29 August 1997.

    Workshop on Prevention of HIV / AIDs and Drug Abuse through Quality Improvement of Curriculum and Teaching / Learning Materials in Asia and the Pacific (1997: Beijing)

    [Unpublished] 1997. [43] p.

    This is a report of the Workshop on "Prevention of HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse through Quality Improvement of Curriculum and Teaching/Learning Materials in Asia and the Pacific" held from 25 to 29 August 1997, in Beijing, China. The Regional Strategy, which is considered the most important outcome of the Workshop, is published in a separate document. The Regional Strategy aims to inform policy on "Preventive Education against HIV/AIDS" in the school setting. Participants to the Workshop were from several Asian countries-China, India, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand and representatives of several organizations, e.g. the Southeast Asia Ministers of Education Organization Regional Tropical Medicine and Public Health Network (SEAMEO-TROPMED); UNDCP and UNESCO Bangkok and Jakarta. In total twenty-two (22) participants and one (1) resource person were present at the workshop. The involvement of UNDCP represents a deliberate strategy to coordinate and streamline activities of common interest across HIV/AIDS and drug use prevention issues. The workshop outcomes are: the Situation Analysis on Preventive Education Against HIV/AIDS in seven countries; the identification of 'best practice' from the region; the formulation of a regional strategy framework and the regional and country plans for follow-up actions. According to the participants, this project is a 'milestone' on preventive education, because in addition to the professional outcomes it has a value-added component which has encouraged the desire to mobilize resources and expertise among partners. The participatory process of the workshop created strong teamwork and encouraged motivation for further work. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    195818

    Talking about AIDS in schools: an AIDS workshop design for school principals, administrators and teachers.

    UNESCO; Rotary International

    New Delhi, India, UNESCO, 1997 May. [30] p.

    As the lead United Nations agency for education, UNESCO's aim in the field of AIDS preventive education is to encourage the development of effective educational strategies, internationally and regionally. These strategies have been adapted to various sociocultural contexts in ways which provide the means for young people to protect themselves from HIV infection. The complex nature of the problems connected with HIV/AIDS calls for a knowledge of the sociocultural, ethnic and scientific aspects of the disease, as well as mastery of communication techniques. In addition, AIDS prevention through education goes hand in hand with the ethics of human relations and with the struggle for human rights, for it is often fear and ignorance that lead to ostracism of, and discrimination against, people living with HIV/AIDS. Over the past years, UNESCO New Delhi has worked extensively for the promotion of HIV/AIDS preventive education within the formal school system in South Asia. Addressed mainly to educational decision-makers, UNESCO's approach enjoys the whole-hearted co-operation of the Ministers of Education, specialised institutes and non-governmental organisations such as professional teachers' organisations parent-teacher associations. The rapid spread of HIV/AIDS and the increasing evidence that younger people, including adolescents risk getting infected with HIV makes it imperative that they be educated on how to protect themselves. Schools have an important role to play in disseminating education to a large number of young people. This advocacy workshop design has been developed to initiated a process in New Delhi schools, by which preventive education on AIDS/STD for adolescents will have acceptance and the full support of school principals, administrators, teachers and parents of secondary school students. We would like to acknowledge the crucial support of the Chanakyapuri Rotary Club - District 3010 for introducing this approach to Rotary Interact member schools, and the Naz Foundation (India) Trust for providing the essential training resources. We believe that preventive education on HIV/AIDS can help young people acquire health-related knowledge, values, skills and practices, to be able to pursue a healthy lifestyle and also to work as agents of change for the health of their communities. School-based AIDS preventive education will continue to have our highest consideration. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.