Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    303025

    HIV / AIDS and Communication for Behaviour and Social Change: Programme Experiences, Examples, and the Way Forward. International Workshop, UNAIDS, Dept. of Policy, Strategy and Research, Geneva, Switzerland, July 25 to 27, 2000.

    Singhal A

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2001 Jun. 65 p. (UNAIDS/01.39E)

    The present report synthesises the deliberations of a workshop on "Communication for Behaviour and Social Change: Programme Experiences, Examples, and the Way Forward", organised by UNAIDS' Department of Policy, Strategy and Research (PSR) and the Secretariat of the International Partnership Against AIDS in Africa (IPAA) in Geneva in July, 2000. The workshop's objectives were (1) to map out strategies for implementation of communication programmes for behaviour and social change, using newly-emerging directions from UNAIDS, Co-sponsors, and other organisations, (2) to strengthen linkages between communication programmes and priority issues in HIV/AIDS in developing countries, and (3) to increase technical soundness in communication programmes, projects, and strategies of organisations working in the realm of HIV/AIDS. Some 67 participants with responsibility for communication-related programmes from UNAIDS, its Co-sponsors, other UN agencies, and other international, regional and in-country organisations, including policy-makers, programme managers, technical advisors, scholars, and Foundation officials participated in the workshop. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    303306

    A report of a theological workshop focusing on HIV- and AIDS-related stigma, 8th-11th December 2003, Windhoek, Namibia. Supported by UNAIDS.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2005 Feb. 62 p. (UNAIDS/05.01E)

    Stigma is difficult to define. Generally, though, it implies the branding or labelling of a person or a group of persons as being unworthy of inclusion in human community, resulting in discrimination and ostracization. The branding or labelling is usually related to some perceived physical, psychological or moral condition believed to render the individual unworthy of full inclusion in the community. We may stigmatize those we regard as impure, unclean or dangerous, those who are different from ourselves or live in different ways, or those who are simply strangers. In the process we construct damaging stereotypes and perpetuate injustice and discrimination. Stigma often involves a conscious or unconscious exercise of power over the vulnerable and marginalized. The purpose of this document is to identify those aspects of Christian theology that endorse or foster stigmatizing attitudes and behaviour towards people living with HIV and AIDS and those around them, and to suggest what resources exist within Christian theology that might enable churches to develop more positive and loving approaches. It is not a theological statement, but rather a framework for theological thinking, and an opportunity, for church leaders, to pursue a deeper Christian reflection on the current crisis. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    282150

    Take care of those you love. Namibia.

    Asino E

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Division of Basic Education, Literacy and Non-Formal Education Section, 2003 Sep. [13] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social, cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    181292

    Public-private partnerships for public health.

    Reich MR

    Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, 2002 Apr. ix, 205 p. (Harvard Series on Population and International Health)

    This book presents the results of the workshop. The essays in this volume offer some fresh perspectives on partnerships, probe some troubling questions, and provide empirical evidence of both benefits and challenges of public-private partnerships. The participants in the meeting also achieved some progress in creating a shared vocabulary, or at least shared understanding, on points of contention, suggesting that dialogue among partisans in public health can help move debates about critical issues forward. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    110804

    Report on WHO's first course to train consultants for Management of Childhood Illness, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, November 13 to December 2, 1995.

    Pond B

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, 1995. [5] p. (Trip Report; BASICS Technical Directive: 000 HT 53 014; USAID Contract No. HRN-6006-C-00-3031-00)

    The World Health Organization's Division of Diarrheal and Acute Respiratory Disease Control (WHO-CDR) and its partners have prepared the Management of Childhood Illness course, which trains health workers in optimal outpatient management of the leading causes of child death: pneumonia, diarrhea, malnutrition, measles, and malaria. During November 13-24, 1995, WHO-CDR held a training course in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, for consultants in Management of Childhood Illness. Following the course, a subset of the consultants participated in a series of workshops on preparations for introducing the course and adapting it to correspond to national policies. WHO-CDR has officially released the materials for training in integrated outpatient management of childhood illness. They include the training materials for participants, the Course Director's Guide, the Facilitator's Guides, three videos, a paper entitled Where Referral Is Not Possible, the Adaptation Guide, and a document entitled Initial Planning by Countries for Integrated Management of Childhood Illness. Preparation needs for use of the course include adaptation of the course to correspond to national policies, organization of training sites, and training of highly qualified facilitators. Complementary training materials are needed for health workers with less formal education, for instruction in inpatient management, and for training private-for-profit health workers. Training must correspond to system-wide changes (e.g., in drug supply and in supervision). The project must extend to the home and community to improve the care for sick children. Training specialists, communications specialists, public health managers, policy makers, and parents of sick children need to be included so as to expand understanding of and support for the initiative in order to complete the unfinished tasks.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    083612

    Report of ICN-WHO project for nurses in Africa.

    Read V

    AUSTRALIAN NURSES JOURNAL. 1992 Sep; 22(3):14-5, 17.

    The International Council of Nurses (ICN)/WHO's Global Programme on AIDS has formed a project called "Mobilizing Nurses for AIDS Prevention and Care in Eight African Countries" to improve the capability and effectiveness of these countries' national nursing associations (NNAs) to take an active part in their countries' HIV/AIDS, to adapt and/or develop educational materials for training trainers, and to train trainers from each NNA to plan and implement HIV/AIDS educational sessions. The ICNWHO Report recommends that national AIDS programs obtain immediately appropriate quantities of protective clothing (e.g., gloves and gowns) for nurses and that NNAs lobby for the provision of this clothing. The Report points out that failure to provide these supplies can result in a considerable loss of nurses. Other issues contributing to health worker flight include responsibility for more patients than nurses can adequately care for, no supplies, lack of recognition, long hours, and poor salaries. NNAs must lobby for effective, holistic emotional support for nurses, as individuals and as professionals, especially those interested in HIV/AIDS prevention and care.
    Add to my documents.