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Your search found 13 Results

  1. 1
    322581

    Implementing the UN learning strategy on HIV / AIDS: sixteen case studies.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007 Mar. 97 p. (UNAIDS/07.08E; JC1311E)

    In April 2003, the Committee of Cosponsoring Organizations of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) approved a Learning Strategy to help UN system staff develop competence on HIV and AIDS. The goals of the Learning Strategy are: to develop the knowledge and competence of the UN and its staff so that they are able to best support national responses to HIV and AIDS; and to ensure that all UN staff members are able to make informed decisions to protect themselves from HIV and, if they are infected or affected by HIV, to ensure that they know where to turn for the best possible care and treatment. This includes ensuring that staff members fully understand the UN's HIV and AIDS workplace policies and how they are implemented. To support UN country teams to implement the Learning Strategy, Learning Facilitators were selected at country level and trained in a series of regional workshops. The Learning Facilitators were then expected to ensure - along with the country teams-that the standards of the Learning Strategy were realized. This report is comprised of UN HIV/AIDS Learning Strategy case studies from sixteen countries: Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, India, Indonesia, Macedonia, Madagascar, Morocco, Nigeria, the Pan American Health Organization headquarters (United States), Pakistan, Paraguay, Vienna (Austria), Viet Nam, and Yemen. It presents each country's unique experience in implementing the strategy since its adoption in 2003. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    321375
    Peer Reviewed

    The introduction of confidential enquiries into maternal deaths and near-miss case reviews in the WHO European region.

    Bacci A; Lewis G; Baltag V; Bertran AP

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2007 Sep; 15(30):145-152.

    Most maternal deaths can be averted with known, effective interventions but countries require information about which women are dying and why, and what can been done to prevent such deaths in future. This paper describes the introduction of two approaches to reviewing maternal deaths and severe obstetric complications in 12 countries in transition in the WHO European Region - national-level confidential enquiries into maternal deaths and facility-based near-miss case reviews. Initially, two regional meetings involving stakeholders from 12 countries were held in 2004-2005, followed by national meetings in seven of the countries. The Republic of Moldova was the first to pilot the review process, preceded by a technical workshop to make detailed plans, provide training in how to facilitate and carry out a review, finalise clinical guidelines against which the findings of the confidential enquiry and near-miss case review could be judged, and a range of other preparatory work. To date, near-miss case reviews have been carried out in the three main referral hospitals in Moldova, and a national committee appointed by the Ministry of Health to conduct the confidential enquiry has met twice. Several other countries have begun a similar process, but progress may remain slow due to continuing fears of punitive actions against health professionals who have a mother or baby die in their care. (author's)
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  3. 3
    320992
    Peer Reviewed

    Surgical services in low-income and middle-income countries.

    Spiegel DA; Gosselin RA

    Lancet. 2007 Sep 22; 370(9592):1013-1015.

    Although substantial progress has been made in addressing the burden of communicable and vaccine-preventable diseases in low-income and middle-income countries, the burden of diseases that are surgically treatable is increasing and has been neglected. Both morbidity and mortality from surgically preventable (eg, elective hernia repair) or treatable (eg, strangulated hernia) disorders can be greatly decreased through simple surgical interventions. Why should a child die from appendicitis, or a mother and child succumb to obstructed labour, when simple surgical procedures can save their lives? Why should patients suffer permanent disability because of congenital abnormalities, fractures, burns, or the sequelae of acute infections such as septic arthritis or osteomyelitis? Many complications of HIV infection (eg, abscesses, fistulas, Kaposi sarcoma) are also amenable to simple surgical interventions. Available epidemiological information and experiential evidence lend support to the conclusion that basic surgical and anaesthetic services should be integrated into primary health-care packages. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    306773

    Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus. GDF / MSH Drug Management Consultant Training Workshop in Vietnam: trip report.

    Moore T

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2005 Nov 11. 12 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-076; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    More than eight million people become sick with Tuberculosis (TB) each year. TB continues to be a major international killer disease because of poor access to effective high quality medicines, irrational treatment decisions and behaviors, and counterproductive financial priorities by some national health systems that impede progress. Access to TB medicines is becoming less of a problem as both first and second-line TB treatments are made available to developing countries through global initiatives such as the Global TB Drug Facility (GDF) and the Green Light Committee (GLC) of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Stop TB department in Geneva. Since 2001 Management Sciences for Health (MSH) through the USAID-funded Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus (RPM Plus) program has collaborated with Stop TB to promote better overall TB drug management by GDF and GLC secretariats and by national TB control programs. RPM Plus activities include technical assistance to the GDF and the GLC to develop program monitoring tools, conduct TB program monitoring missions to recipient countries of GDF drugs, audits of monitoring missions conducted by partner organizations and training workshops on TB pharmaceutical management. GDF and GLC secretariats operate with minimal staffs and both depend greatly on partner organizations to carry out the necessary in-country work to make sure TB medicines are received, distributed and used according to guidelines. The number of countries receiving GDF and GLC support is ever increasing requiring even more assistance from partner organizations like MSH/RPM Plus. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    305867

    Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus. WHO Biregional Workshop on Monitoring, Training and Planning (MTP) for Improving Rational Use of Medicines, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, December 14-16, 2005: trip report.

    Walkowiak H

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2006 Jan 23. 53 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-511; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    The workshop on Monitoring, Training and Planning (MTP) for Improving Rational Use of Medicines was convened jointly by two World Health Organization (WHO) regional offices -- for the Western Pacific (WPRO) and South East Asia (SEARO). Recognizing that the problem-focused strategy of MTP has been field-tested in several countries and shown to have significant impact in reducing the overuse and misuse of antibiotics and injections, the second International Conference on Improving Use of Medicines held in Chaing Mai, Thailand from March 30 to April 2, 2004 recommended that the MTP strategy be scaled up and replicated in other countries. Ineffective and often harmful prescribing and use of medicines remains widespread in many countries in the Western Pacific and South-East Asia, and WHO is collaborating with Australian Government Overseas Aid Program (AusAID) to train participants from countries in the two regions to implement MTP. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    300913

    Report on series of workshops "Leadership for Results". UNDP in Ukraine. May, 24-31 2004.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    [Kyiv], Ukraine, UNDP, 2004. [61] p.

    The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) organized a series of "Leadership for Results" workshops on May 24-31 2004 to develop and boost leadership skills of several participants' categories: trade union leaders, public figures, physicians, women-leaders, Peer Education Program trainers, etc. Allan Henderson, who facilitated this workshop, pointed out that "these workshops are not meant to make leaders of those who are not leaders, but rather to provide the opportunity for people who already are leaders to step out of the day-to-day business and address their own development." The task for participants is to improve themselves and society, to get to the higher leadership level, to develop more holistic outlook and support leadership skills with more comprehensive background. The structure of this leadership workshop stipulates three meetings with three months intervals. Methods applied in the workshop are as follows: education (knowledge transfer); training (practice of skill development) and coaching (establishing new opportunities for the future). The first workshop on May 24-25 that UNDP held jointly with the International Labor Organization (ILO) welcomed over 70 leaders from four most active trade union associations in Ukraine. It was just recently that trade unions started paying attention to the problem of HIV/AIDS. For the majority of participants it was their first workshop. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    297229

    Adapted for use in former Soviet countries, WHO/US government PMTCT protocols are introduced in three Russian cities.

    Connections. 2005 Aug-Sep; [3] p..

    HIV/AIDS is called a women's disease in African countries because almost 60 percent of the people infected with the virus are women. This comparison may soon also be relevant for Russia where the relative share of women among people with HIV is rising steadily. In some regions it is already in excess of 40 percent. Russian experts attribute this situation to the development of the commercial sex trade, as well as to a rising rate of transmission through sexual contact with drug users. The gravest situation is the escalating incidence of HIV/AIDS among women of childbearing age, especially those between 15 and 30. More and more cases of the disease are being reported in this group. Many of them are diagnosed during pregnancy, which translates to a corresponding increase the number of HIV-infected children in Russia. At the start of 2005, approximately 10,000 such children had been registered, whereas in 1996 there were only 18 of them. While it is practically impossible to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS among adults, mother-to-child transmission of the virus can be controlled. The question, "How?" is complex and multifaceted. It was discussed in detail by participants in a series of workshops sponsored by UNICEF and AIHA in three Russian cities-- Magnitogorsk, Orenburg, and Chelyabinsk--between May and August this year. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    297156

    Odessa workshop helps build capacity among Ukrainian clinicians who care for people living with HIV / AIDS.

    Connections. 2004 Jan; [2] p..

    A recent Anti-retroviral Therapy Training Workshop held in Odessa, Ukraine, marked the start of an ongoing collaboration between AIHA and the Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF). It was the first training hosted under the aegis of the newly established World Health Organization Regional HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment Knowledge Hub for which AIHA is the primary implementing partner. This Knowledge Hub was created in response to the burgeoning HIV/AIDS pandemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia to serve as a crucial capacity-building mechanism for reaching WHO's "3 by 5" targets for the region. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    176310

    The role of the traditional midwife in the family planning program. Report of National Workshop to Review Researches into Dukun Activities related to MCH Care and Family Planning.

    Indonesia. Department of Health; Indonesia. National Family Planning Coordinating Board [BKKBN]; Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association; Universitas Indonesia

    [Jakarta], Indonesia, Department of Health, 1972. 83 p.

    A number of studies conducted already have revealed that there are possibilities of using dukuns as potential helpers in the family planning programme. Bearing in mind that the number of dukuns at the present time is large, it is easy to imagine that they are capable of contributing a great deal towards progress in our family planning programme provided that the dukuns are assigned a role which is appropriate. In this respect, I am only referring to dukuns whose prime function is helping mothers during pregnancy and immediately afterwards, and who have close contact therefore, with the target of the family planning programme, i.e. the eligible couples. It would indeed be very helpful, if we could find out from the available data and from the results of applied research what exactly is the scope and usefulness of dukuns in the family planning programme. It seems to me that in this project we have to consider a twofold problem. The first aspect of the problem is that the dukuns are mostly of an advanced age and they are illiterate. The second aspect is that in spite of relationships with MCH centers extending over a period of years most of the dukuns still prefer their own way of doing things and they remain unaffected by modern ways of thinking. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    132668

    Capacity-building activities in the Arab States.

    El Sioufi M

    HABITAT DEBATE. 1996 Mar; 2(1):24.

    The UN Centre for Human Settlements (UNCHS) (Habitat) Training and Capacity-Building Section has been active in several of the Arab States. Beginning in 1995, Belgium funded a 3-year project, "Localising Agenda 21: Action Planning for Sustainable Urban Development," in Essaouira, Morocco. A local team was established, and an Action Planning Consultation Workshop was held in January 1996. Local participants, Belgian experts, and the UNCHS Training and Capacity-Building Section attended the workshop, the goal of which was to guide the town in achieving sustainable development. The experiences from this project will be disseminated throughout the region. In Egypt, the Training and Capacity Building Section has initiated the "Sustainable Ismailia Project," a training program, which may be expanded nationally, for locally elected leadership. The Egyptian government will be responsible for the majority of the implementation funding; training materials are being prepared, and training should begin in 1996. The Palestinian Authority (Gaza Strip), Jordan, Mauritania, and Yemen have requested capacity-building programs. The "Urban Settlements and Management Programme" has requested a training program for Somalia after the country stabilizes. "A Regional Capacity-Building Programme" is being designed for national training institutions in the Arab States; the program will focus on the training of trainers, urban managers, and elected leadership. UNCHS training materials and handbooks are being translated into Arabic. This training was requested by Member States during the 15th session of the Commission on Human Settlements.
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  11. 11
    110804

    Report on WHO's first course to train consultants for Management of Childhood Illness, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, November 13 to December 2, 1995.

    Pond B

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, 1995. [5] p. (Trip Report; BASICS Technical Directive: 000 HT 53 014; USAID Contract No. HRN-6006-C-00-3031-00)

    The World Health Organization's Division of Diarrheal and Acute Respiratory Disease Control (WHO-CDR) and its partners have prepared the Management of Childhood Illness course, which trains health workers in optimal outpatient management of the leading causes of child death: pneumonia, diarrhea, malnutrition, measles, and malaria. During November 13-24, 1995, WHO-CDR held a training course in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, for consultants in Management of Childhood Illness. Following the course, a subset of the consultants participated in a series of workshops on preparations for introducing the course and adapting it to correspond to national policies. WHO-CDR has officially released the materials for training in integrated outpatient management of childhood illness. They include the training materials for participants, the Course Director's Guide, the Facilitator's Guides, three videos, a paper entitled Where Referral Is Not Possible, the Adaptation Guide, and a document entitled Initial Planning by Countries for Integrated Management of Childhood Illness. Preparation needs for use of the course include adaptation of the course to correspond to national policies, organization of training sites, and training of highly qualified facilitators. Complementary training materials are needed for health workers with less formal education, for instruction in inpatient management, and for training private-for-profit health workers. Training must correspond to system-wide changes (e.g., in drug supply and in supervision). The project must extend to the home and community to improve the care for sick children. Training specialists, communications specialists, public health managers, policy makers, and parents of sick children need to be included so as to expand understanding of and support for the initiative in order to complete the unfinished tasks.
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  12. 12
    092971

    Regional health team commits to high-quality primary care services.

    Center for Human Services. Quality Assurance Project

    Q.A. REPORTS. 1993 Jun; 1-2.

    In May, 1992, the Regional Directorate of Health (DOH) in Tahoua, Niger, launched efforts to strengthen primary health care services in the region. The DOH organized a workshop for regional leaders to articulate their own vision of high quality health services for the regional health care system. Additionally, managers began applying fundamental quality assurance (QA) concepts and techniques to rectify service deficiencies. Tahoua's regional director and the QAP resident advisor invited technical and administrative directors of regional services and the district medical officers to participate in a workshop to win support for QA. The health managers first examined their individual values, the Tahoua regional health care organization's values, and community values. After viewing videotaped interviews documenting Nigerians' level of satisfaction with health care services, workshop participants recognized that clients have unique perspectives on favorable health care. Hence, the providers included responsiveness to client needs as a key factor in their vision of high quality care. The participants developed possible answers to the three key questions influencing a mission statements: 1) what services are provided; 2) for whom are they provided; and 3) in what fashion are they provided. The responses from all participants resulted in a regional mission statement. Trainers presented QAP's approach to quality improvement: 1) planning for quality assurance; 3) problem solving to correct deficiencies. Workshop participants immediately applied QAP quality improvement concepts by practicing with case studies and by examining actual health system problems. Participants will continue working in teams to devise and test solutions to selected problems. QAP's resident advisor will provide the teams with intensive coaching for effective application of quality improvement methodology. By the end of its two years of technical support, QAP intends to leave a core group of health personnel operating at all levels of Tahoua's primary health care system.
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  13. 13
    083612

    Report of ICN-WHO project for nurses in Africa.

    Read V

    AUSTRALIAN NURSES JOURNAL. 1992 Sep; 22(3):14-5, 17.

    The International Council of Nurses (ICN)/WHO's Global Programme on AIDS has formed a project called "Mobilizing Nurses for AIDS Prevention and Care in Eight African Countries" to improve the capability and effectiveness of these countries' national nursing associations (NNAs) to take an active part in their countries' HIV/AIDS, to adapt and/or develop educational materials for training trainers, and to train trainers from each NNA to plan and implement HIV/AIDS educational sessions. The ICNWHO Report recommends that national AIDS programs obtain immediately appropriate quantities of protective clothing (e.g., gloves and gowns) for nurses and that NNAs lobby for the provision of this clothing. The Report points out that failure to provide these supplies can result in a considerable loss of nurses. Other issues contributing to health worker flight include responsibility for more patients than nurses can adequately care for, no supplies, lack of recognition, long hours, and poor salaries. NNAs must lobby for effective, holistic emotional support for nurses, as individuals and as professionals, especially those interested in HIV/AIDS prevention and care.
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