Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    321122

    Engaging faith-based organizations in HIV prevention. A training manual for programme managers.

    Toure A; Melek M; Jato M; Kane M; Kajungu R

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2007. [53] p.

    The influence behind faith-based organizations is not difficult to discern. In many developing countries, FBOs not only provide spiritual guidance to their followers; they are often the primary providers for a variety of local health and social services. Situated within communities and building on relationships of trust, these organizations have the ability to influence the attitudes and behaviours of their fellow community members. Moreover, they are in close and regular contact with all age groups in society and their word is respected. In fact, in some traditional communities, religious leaders are often more influential than local government officials or secular community leaders. Many of the case studies researched for the UNFPA publication Culture Matters showed that the involvement of faith-based organizations in UNFPA-supported projects enhanced negotiations with governments and civil society on culturally sensitive issues. Gradually, these experiences are being shared across countries andacross regions, which has facilitated interfaith dialogue on the most effective approaches to prevent the spread of HIV. Such dialogue has also helped convince various faith-based organizations that joining together as a united front is the most effective way to fight the spread of HIV and lessen the impact of AIDS. This manual is a capacity-building tool to help policy makers and programmers identify, design and follow up on HIV prevention programmes undertaken by FBOs. The manual can also be used by development practitioners partnering with FBOs to increase their understanding of the role of FBOs in HIV prevention, and to design plans for partnering with FBOs to halt the spread of the virus. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    283986

    Strategy to involve rural workers in the fight against HIV / AIDS through community mobilisation programs. Draft for review.

    Schapink D; van Poelje R; Reerink IH; Delion J; Gurung D

    [Unpublished] 2000 May 1. 58 p.

    The Rural HIV/AIDS Initiatives (RAIDS) is a contribution of the rural sector to the Bank’s multisectoral effort designated as AIDS Campaign Team (ACT- Africa) launched in 1999. Starting in 1998, RAIDS attempted to involve rural communities in HIV/AIDS prevention and mitigation through rural frontline workers especially extension workers and/or local RAIDS consultants in Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Cote d’Ivoire, Guinea, Malawi, Niger and Nigeria. RAIDS commissioned a team of consultants from the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT) and Tanzania Netherlands Support for AIDS (TANESA) to review rural AIDS activities in SSA and to develop a framework of strategies to involve rural workers and rural communities in HIV/AIDS prevention and mitigation efforts. This report is the outcome of their work, and is based on literature review, field visits and KIT/TANESA’s experience on district level approach to HIV/AID prevention and mitigation in Africa. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    178299
    Peer Reviewed

    Researchers argue that unsafe injections spread HIV more than unsafe sex.

    Crabb C

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2003; 81(4):307.

    Three recent studies challenge the assumption that the main cause of the spread of HIV in Africa is unprotected sex. They argue that it is unsafe injections, which transmit the infection on a far larger scale than has previously been thought. Most experts assume that unsafe sex between men and women is responsible for 90% of HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa. The medical reuse of contaminated needles and syringes is thought to account for another 5%. The authors of the controversial trio of papers recently published in the International Journal of STD and AIDS (2003;14;144-73) take a radically different view. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.