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  1. 1
    305867

    Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus. WHO Biregional Workshop on Monitoring, Training and Planning (MTP) for Improving Rational Use of Medicines, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, December 14-16, 2005: trip report.

    Walkowiak H

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2006 Jan 23. 53 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-511; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    The workshop on Monitoring, Training and Planning (MTP) for Improving Rational Use of Medicines was convened jointly by two World Health Organization (WHO) regional offices -- for the Western Pacific (WPRO) and South East Asia (SEARO). Recognizing that the problem-focused strategy of MTP has been field-tested in several countries and shown to have significant impact in reducing the overuse and misuse of antibiotics and injections, the second International Conference on Improving Use of Medicines held in Chaing Mai, Thailand from March 30 to April 2, 2004 recommended that the MTP strategy be scaled up and replicated in other countries. Ineffective and often harmful prescribing and use of medicines remains widespread in many countries in the Western Pacific and South-East Asia, and WHO is collaborating with Australian Government Overseas Aid Program (AusAID) to train participants from countries in the two regions to implement MTP. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    135865

    Training for advocacy. Report of the Inter-Regional Advocacy Training Workshop held in Nairobi in March 1996.

    Hawkins C

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 1996. 16, [2] p.

    This document reports on the Inter-regional Advocacy Training Workshop held by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) in Nairobi, Kenya in 1996. The purpose of the workshop was to train trainers in the advocacy skills needed to advocate for the IPPF's "Vision 2000" goals. Specific objectives of the workshop included drafting an advocacy plan of action, identifying training needs and support, replicating the training project, and exchanging experiences. The report opens with background information explaining why advocacy is important to the IPPF and an introduction to the workshop. The report then covers the skills of clarifying advocacy, reaching consensus in the organization, coalition building, making the most of the mass media, and dealing with the opposition. Next, the report presents a case study of the successful work of the Kenyan Family Planning Association (FPA) in advocating eradication of female genital mutilation. The report continues by discussing the skills of organizing political lobbying, mobilizing resources, evaluating advocacy, and drafting strategic advocacy plans. The report ends by recommending that 1) FPAs receive specific training to embark on advocacy programs, 2) a training module be developed, 3) the IPPF's Advocacy Guide include definitions of advocacy concepts, 4) the IPPF adopt clear and uniform definitions of concepts throughout all of its documents, 5) workshops allow for close interaction with the participants' objectives, 6) advocacy materials be pretested, and 7) regular exchanges of experiences be arranged.
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  3. 3
    121436

    HIV / AIDS workshop: community-based prevention and control strategies, Volume II. Khon Kaen, Thailand, November 15-26, 1993. Report.

    Garcia C

    Woking, England, Plan International, 1993. [6], 61 p.

    This report contains the proceedings of the portion of a 1993 HIV/AIDS workshop held in Thailand dealing with community-based prevention and control strategies. The report opens by identifying PLAN international's identity, vision, and mission. The next section reviews PLAN's policy on children directly or indirectly affected by HIV/AIDS. Section 3 brings perspectives from Burkina Faso, India, Kenya, Thailand, and Zimbabwe to the problem of home care, and section 4 applies perspectives from Indonesia, Kenya, the Philippines, Senegal, and Zimbabwe to the evaluation of health education interventions. Section 5 presents a commentary on planning, monitoring, and evaluating PLAN's AIDS programming, and section 6 summarizes a group discussion on possible future actions that PLAN should take. The seventh section of the report contains profiles of the HIV/AIDS situation in Burkina Faso, India, Indonesia, Kenya, the Philippines, Senegal, Thailand, and Zimbabwe. The report ends with a description of the collaboration between the Family AIDS Caring Trust and PLAN International in Zimbabwe.
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  4. 4
    076557
    Peer Reviewed

    IAP-IPA-WHO-UNICEF Workshop on Strategies and Approaches for Women's Health, Child Health and Family Planning for the Decade of Nineties, 22nd-23rd January 1991, Hyderabad.

    Bhargava SK; Hallman N; Shah PM

    INDIAN PEDIATRICS. 1991 Dec; 28(12):1481-2.

    In 1991, health professionals attended a workshop to develop strategies and approaches for women's health, child health, and family planning for the 1990s in Hyderabad, India. The Ministry of Health (MOH) of India should improve and strengthen existing health facilities, manpower, materials, and supplies. It should not continue vertical programs dedicated to 1 disease or a few problems. Instead it should integrate programs. The government must stop allocating more funds to family planning services than to MCH services. It should equally appropriate funds to family planning, family welfare, and MCH. The MOH should implement task force recommendations on minimum prenatal care (1982) and maternal mortality (1987) to strengthen prenatal care, delivery services, and newborn care. Health workers must consider newborns as individuals and allot them their own bed in the hospital. All district and city hospitals should have an intermediate or Level II care nursery to improve neonatal survival. In addition, the country has the means to improve child health services. The most effective means to improve health services and community utilization is training all health workers, revision of basic curricula, and strengthen existing facilities. Family planning professionals should use couple protection time rather than couple protection rate. The should also target certain contraceptives to specific age groups. Mass media can disseminate information to bring about behavioral and social change such as increasing marriage age. Secondary school teachers should teach sex education. Health professionals must look at the total female instead of child, adolescent, pregnant woman, and reproductive health. Integrated Child Development Services should support MCH programs. Operations research should be used to evaluate the many parts of MCH programs. The government needs to promote community participation in MCH services.
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  5. 5
    070600

    How to estimate incremental resource requirements and costs of alternative TT immunization strategies: a manual for health and program managers. Revised version.

    Brenzel L; Foulon G

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow, Inc. [JSI], Resources for Child Health Project [REACH], 1989 Jun. [4], 22 p. (USAID Contract No. DPE-5927-C-00-5068-00)

    The REACH Project originally prepared this manual for health and program managers for WHO workshops in Africa on the control of neonatal tetanus. The manual provides rapid methods for determining incremental resource requirements and costs of tetanus toxoid (TT) immunization programs. Its design allows for flexibility. It categorizes costs into variable costs such as vaccines, syringes, and needles and fixed costs such as training, personnel, supervision, and transportation. The manual provides a worksheet for calculating the variable costs for programs which requires the managers to consider the target population (pregnant women or women of childbearing age) and coverage objective (TT2 or TT5). Further it presents a formula for determining costs of additional personnel (a variable cost): personnel costs=number of workers x proportion of time for TT vaccination for each worker x annual gross earnings of each workers. It also has guidelines for determining fixed costs such as cold chain equipment costs. Transportation costs consists mostly of fuel costs but also includes the costs of vehicles to move vaccines, supplies, and personnel. Training costs include production of training materials, travel, per diem, and proportion of annual salaries of trainers and trainees for training time. The manual also has worksheets for determining supervision and monitoring costs. Further it has a worksheet to calculate additional media costs for TT immunization including radio. TV, and posters. Once managers have determined the costs of various components of TT immunization programs, they can sum the costs up and determine the cost effectiveness of TT immunization strategies on another worksheet. The manual concludes with a formula to assist managers determine whether changing from 1 strategy to another would save them more money and be more cost effective.
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