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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    283986

    Strategy to involve rural workers in the fight against HIV / AIDS through community mobilisation programs. Draft for review.

    Schapink D; van Poelje R; Reerink IH; Delion J; Gurung D

    [Unpublished] 2000 May 1. 58 p.

    The Rural HIV/AIDS Initiatives (RAIDS) is a contribution of the rural sector to the Bank’s multisectoral effort designated as AIDS Campaign Team (ACT- Africa) launched in 1999. Starting in 1998, RAIDS attempted to involve rural communities in HIV/AIDS prevention and mitigation through rural frontline workers especially extension workers and/or local RAIDS consultants in Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Cote d’Ivoire, Guinea, Malawi, Niger and Nigeria. RAIDS commissioned a team of consultants from the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT) and Tanzania Netherlands Support for AIDS (TANESA) to review rural AIDS activities in SSA and to develop a framework of strategies to involve rural workers and rural communities in HIV/AIDS prevention and mitigation efforts. This report is the outcome of their work, and is based on literature review, field visits and KIT/TANESA’s experience on district level approach to HIV/AID prevention and mitigation in Africa. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    074767

    Strengthening of management of maternal and child health and family planning programmes. Report of an intercountry workshop, New Delhi, 27-31 August 1990.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. South-East Asia Region

    [Unpublished] 1991 Feb 14. [2], 20 p. (SEA/MCH/FP/99; Project No. ICP MCH 011)

    >20 participants from UNFPA/UNICEF/USAID and 23 participants from 10 countries from the WHO Southeast Asia Region attended the Workshop on Strengthening of Management of Maternal and Child Health (MCH) and Family Planning (FP) Programmes in New Delhi, India in August 1990. The workshop consisted of presentations and discussions of country reports, technical papers, dynamic work groups, and plenary consensus. The WHO/SEARO technical officer for family health presented a thorough overview on strengthening MCH/FP services in a primary health care setting. Issues addressed included regional status on population growth, urban migration and development. MCH status, management of MCH/FP services, strategic planning, and management information. In Bangladesh, the government integrated MCH services with FP services, but other child programs including immunization, control of diarrheal disease program, nutrition, acute respiratory infection remained with the health division. Obstacles of the MCH/FP program in the Maldives were shortage of trained human resources, preference of health providers to work in urban areas, inadequate logistics, and insufficient supervision in peripheral health centers. A nomadic way of life among the rural peoples posed special problems for the delivery of MCH services in Mongolia where large family size was encouraged. Other country reports included Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. A case study of the model mother program in Thailand and the local area monitoring technique in Indonesia were shared with participants. District team work groups identified key MCH/FP management problems including organization, planning, and management; finance and resource allocation; intersectoral action; community participation; and human resource development. The workshop revealed the national health leaders with hopes for WHO technical assistance were developing a rapid evaluation methodology.
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  3. 3
    133499

    Inter-Agency Working Group on Participation meetings hosted by UNDP, September 17-18, 1996, New York City, NY.

    Bhattacharyya K

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival [BASICS], 1996. [8] p. (Report; USAID Contract No. HRN-00-93-00031-00)

    This report pertains to BASICS participation at a meeting of the Interagency Learning Group on Participation (IGP) hosted by the UN Development Program in New York City, on September 17-18, 1996. Participants included UNICEF, the World Bank, Overseas Development Assistance, Asian Development Bank, USAID, and other international organizations. This was the first time that BASICS was included in the meetings to share their community participatory experiences and to explore opportunities for collaboration. The meeting was the third of its kind. IGP is a voluntary group without a budget who represent multilateral, bilateral, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The IGP is concerned with institutional change and creating awareness of the value of participatory approaches; training and country-level capacity building; information and dissemination; and monitoring and evaluation. The UNDP administrator emphasized the need to focus on more information disclosure for donors and NGOs, the context of increasing decentralization, legal frameworks for the empowerment of women, and the importance of democratization. Most of the presentations focused on the internal institutional constraints to promoting and implementing participation in the field. The logical framework approach does not lend itself to participatory development. UNICEF ran workshops in 3 countries on how to use a more participatory manner in country programs, but after 6 months trainees still had difficulty with applications. Internal policies and procedures, lack of tools for monitoring, a need to change staff attitudes, specific country context, and institutional capacity to identify and work with the right partners were all problems. An NGO in India, cautioned against too much participation. Smaller plenary discussions focused on dealing with conflict, outcomes, redistribution of power, the public good, and village logbooks.
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  4. 4
    097654

    Cairo work schedule, procedures outlined in letter to governments.

    ICPD 94. 1994 Jun; (16):1, 4-5.

    A brief description of key points of a May 25, 1994, letter from Dr. Nafis Sadik to countries participating in the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) was provided. The letter indicated the draft provisional rules of procedure for the ICPD and included some comments and suggestions. The UN General Assembly resolution 47/176 stipulated that the head of each delegation should be a government minister or higher public official. Heads of State and Foreign Ministers were asked to provide the names of each delegate well in advance of the ICPD and to submit credentials at least a week beforehand. On August 25, 1994, delegates will be formally registered on site. Dr. Sadik strongly urged that delegations be gender-balanced and include representatives of nongovernmental organizations, various sectors, and national groups involved with population and development strategies. The traditional agenda includes preliminary meetings on September 3 and 4 for discussion of procedural and organizational issues. The provisional agenda includes opening remarks, election of the president, adoption of rules of procedure, adoption of the agenda, election of other officers, organization of work, credentials of representatives to the ICPD, experiences in population and development strategies, Programme of Action of the ICPD, and adoption of the report of the ICPD. The general debate will be conducted during plenary sessions from September 5-9, with a focus on item 8 of the provisional agenda. The Main Committee will meet concurrently to complete negotiations on the Programme of Action (item 9), and then submit its report to the plenary. The report adopted at the ICPD will be submitted to the UN General Assembly one week after the conference ends. The draft Programme of Action was a result of PrepCom III deliberations among the delegations and countries represented. Dr. Sadik expects the Egyptian President and the UN Secretary General to address the plenary session of the ICPD.
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  5. 5
    073671

    Selected UNFPA-funded projects executed by the WHO/South East Asian regional office (SEARO).

    Sobrevilla L; Deville W; Reddy N

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [1992]. v, 69, [2] p. (Evaluation Report)

    In 1991, a mission in India, Bhutan and Nepal evaluated UNFPA/WHO South East Asian Regional Office (SEARO) maternal and child health/family planning (MCH/FP) projects. The Regional Advisory Team in MCH/FP Project (RT) placed more emphasis on the MCH component than the FP component. It included all priority areas identified in 1984, but did not include management until 1988. In fact, it delayed recruiting a technical officer and recruited someone who was unqualified and who performed poorly. SEARO improved cooperation between RT and community health units and named the team leader as regional adviser for family health. The RT team did not promote itself very well, however, Member countries and UNFPA did request technical assistance from RT for MCH/FP projects, especially operations research. RT also set up fruitful intercountry workshops. The team did not put much effort in training, adolescent health, and transfer of technology, though. Further RT project management was still weak. Overall SEARO had been able to follow the policies of governments, but often its advisors did not follow UNFPA guidelines when helping countries plan the design and strategy of country projects. Delays in approval were common in all the projects reviewed by the mission. Furthermore previous evaluations also identified this weakness. In addition, a project in Bhutan addressed mothers' concerns but ignored other women's roles such as managers of households and wage earners. Besides, little was done to include women's participation in health sector decision making at the basic health unit and at the central health ministry. In Nepal, institution building did not include advancement for women or encourage proactive role roles of qualified women medical professionals. In Bhutan, but not Nepal, fellowships and study tours helped increase the number of trained personnel attending intercountry activities.
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  6. 6
    072416

    Report. Seminar on Maternal and Child Health / Family Planning Programme Management, convened by the Regional Office for the Western Pacific of the World Health Organization, Nadi, Fiji, 29 April - 10 May 1991.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 1991 Jul. [3], 67 p. (Report Series No. RS/91/GE/08(FIJ); (WP)MCH/ICP/MCH/001-E)

    12 national coordinators of UNFPA funded maternal and child health/family planning projects attended the Seminar on Maternal and Child Health/Family Planning Programme Management in Nadi, Fiji between April 19-May 10, 1991. The Regional Office for the Western Pacific of Who organized the seminar. Participants came from Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Papua New Guinea, Republic or Marshall Islands, Republic of Palua, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu. Seminar leaders concentrated on having participants use the UNFPA project formulation guidelines and evaluation procedures. Participants learned about project formulation, target setting, project management (personnel, time, and logistics), management information systems (MIS), and project strategies especially community participation. At the end of the seminar, they applied their new knowledge and skills in developing workable country plans of action. Resource personnel helped each participant with preparing the country plans. Overall the participants considered the seminar to have been a success. Yet, even though UNFPA laid out the guidelines logically, participants found them to be complex and difficult to understand. They also expressed the need for training after the seminar to make it more effective. Participants acknowledged the importance of MIS and that MIS must be developed further in participating countries. Further they mentioned the value of community based data in effectively managing projects. A sample country plan of the Federated States of Micronesia and the Kingdom of Tonga follows the report.
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