Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 10 Results

  1. 1
    331627

    Developing and testing strategies for increasing awareness of the IUDas a contraceptive option.

    Vernon R; Khan ME; Birungi H; Askew I; Stones W

    [Washington, D.C.], Population Council, Frontiers in Reproductive Health, 2007 Dec. 21 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-98-00012-00)

    Much of the programmatic and research experience gained over the past two decades has focused on increasing understanding of supply-side factors that limit the provision and use of the IUD, for example, developing training programs, demonstrating the ability of lower level medical staff to provide the method, and assessing the interaction between IUDs, STIs and, more recently, HIV. There is now sufficient empirical evidence from a range of settings to allow program managers and technical assistance organizations to develop guidelines and plans for strengthening the systems necessary to support country-level introduction or 'rehabilitation'; of the IUD within a program offering a range of contraceptive choices. The objectives were: To conduct a meeting of researchers and program managers from three continents and several international organizations to review reasons for under-utilization of the IUD and recent experiences in increasing awareness about the IUD; To develop proposals for operations research projects to test the most promising interventions to introduce and expand access to IUD services and to implement the projects with national partner organizations; To disseminate results of the successful strategies. (Excerpts]
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    327448

    Strengthening the Education Sector Response to HIV and AIDS in the Caribbean. UNESCO / WB partnership in support of CARICOM strategy in education and HIV and AIDS.

    Bundy DA; Fontani P; Ruiz Devesa D; O'Connell TE; Babb J

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2007 Dec 14. 29 p.

    This report presents the findings and outcomes of the three joint UNESCO/WB missions to Guyana, Jamaica and St. Lucia, and elaborates on next steps identified for action at both national and regional levels. The report also sets these findings and next steps within the broader context of the Caribbean plan for action and presents in its appendices, sample resources to guide the development of a comprehensive response to HIV & AIDS by the education sector.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    304802

    Adolescent and Youth Sexual and Reproductive Health: Charting Directions for a Second Generation of Programming. A report on a workshop of the UNFPA in collaboration with the Population Council, 1--3 May 2002, New York.

    Arnold E

    New York, New York, Population Council, 2003. [41] p.

    The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), in collaboration with the Population Council, convened a three-day workshop that took place 1--3 May 2002 at the Population Council's headquarters in New York. The workshop provided an opportunity to review research and programs in the area of adolescent reproductive health and development (the "first generation") and to think critically about key lessons learned from this work as we move forward into the "second generation" of work with this important population. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from that workshop. For the purposes of this executive summary, we are gathering key points into two clusters: those that underscore principles of program planning, design, and evaluation, and those that highlight neglected subjects or subgroups on the adolescent agenda. Where possible, reference is made to the sections of the report as well as the background paper where the reader may find more detailed descriptions. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    080183

    Integration of population education in APPEAL. Volume Two. Population education in universal primary education.

    UNESCO. Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific [PROAP]

    Bangkok, Thailand, UNESCO, PROAP, 1992. [3], 100 p. (Population Education Programme Service)

    As part of the goal to integrate population education into primary school curriculum and literacy programs, workshops were held in 1989 and 1991. The noteworthy teaching materials for primary education included in this document were generated from the experiences in Indonesia and Pakistan. Workshop participants completed questionnaires on various aspects of population education and then visits were made to 3 primary schools in SD Jayagiri, SD Negeri Lembang V, and SD Negeri Cibodas, Indonesia; observations were made and teachers and principals identified their needs. A similar process led to the production of materials for Pakistan after visits to a Muslim community about 4 km from Islamabad and to Saidpur, Pakistan. The materials from Indonesia focused on core messages and submessages on small family size for family welfare, delayed marriage, responsible parenthood, population planning for environmental and resource conservation and development, reorientation of beliefs, and improved status for women. Each core unit had a submessage, objective, content, method or format, target audience, and learning activity. For example, the core message on small family size for family welfare contains the message that a family needs a budget. The objective is to develop an awareness of the relationship between family needs and family income. The content is to stress the limits to expenditures within family resources and a comparison of sharing available resources in a large family. The method or format is a script for radio directed to out-of-school children and class VI. Dialogue is presented in a scene about purchasing food at a local market. The noteworthy curriculum materials from Pakistan focuses on their problems, their population, family, teachings of the Holy Prophet Muhammad, implications of population growth, living things and their environment, and Shimim's story. Each issue has a class time, subject, core message, and instructional objective. In Shimim's story, the social studies class is devoted for 45 minutes to the core message about elders as an asset to the family and society. Reading material is provided and the teacher directs questions about the material and tests students with true/false questions.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    113360

    Sexual reality. The gap between family planning services and clients' needs.

    Gordon G

    In: Learning about sexuality: a practical beginning, edited by Sondra Zeidenstein and Kirsten Moore. New York, New York, Population Council, 1996. 363-79.

    IPPF's AIDS Prevention Unit (APU) conducted HIV prevention training workshops for key staff of family planning associations (FPAs) in West Africa. The experience of these workshops and the findings of a 1992 needs assessment among selected FPAs have articulated the nature of the gap between clients' needs and social norms and providers' values in relation to sexual behavior. This chapter of the book entitled Learning about Sexuality: A Practical Beginning examines how sexual options to minimize the risk of HIV infection (condom use, abstinence, fidelity within marriage, and nonpenetrative sex) correspond with the realities of the attitudes and sexual lives of different client groups. It also addresses how effective these options are in preventing HIV/AIDS. Another discussion revolves around the extent providers help clients determine the best HIV prevention strategy for themselves. The book also covers whether providers help clients overcome gender inequalities that place them at risk of HIV infection or reinforce gender stereotypes. Significant obstacles among the work of the APU include providers' long-standing attitudes, biases, and perception; consideration of counseling and education as if the clients can freely decide what to do about sex; providers' concern for social and moral well-being of clients; and conflict between contraceptive targets and the mandate to provide clients with the information needed to make informed choices about reproductive and sexual health. The book provides four steps to address these obstacles and to change the behavior of both FPA staff and clients in order to close the gap between their goals and perception: structured sessions on gender issues in FPA staff training and actively challenge gender discrimination and attitudes that result in sexual ill health; structured activities on religion, traditional sexual culture, and sexual health in FPA staff training; pilot projects that test the feasibility of FPAs using a participatory community development approach in sexual health; and network with groups that have resources to address some underlying determinants of sexual health.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    107011

    International workshop report: Counselling and HIV Infection for Family Planning Associations, 13-17th March, 1989.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. AIDS Prevention Unit

    [Unpublished] 1989. [60] p.

    The International Family Planning Federation's AIDS Prevention Unit sponsored a five-day workshop on counseling and HIV infection for family planning associations (FPAs) at a facility for people with HIV/AIDS in March 1989. The objectives included sharing experiences in counseling on HIV/STDs (sexually transmitted diseases) in family planning programs, examining the integration of sexual health issues into family planning counseling, identifying training needs in interpersonal communication and sexual health issues, sharing approaches to meeting those training needs, and developing an action plan for counseling and sexual health. After introductions on the first day, participants divided into groups to address what they wanted to get out of the workshop, what they wanted to contribute to the workshop, and what their biggest concern is about integrating counseling with AIDS/STDs into their family planning programs. They also shared information on their programs about the status of FPAs in terms of counseling and HIV. The second day involved a name game and role playing to illustrate different levels of communication. Participants also discussed the difference between information, education, and counseling and took part in an exercise geared to trigger facts and feelings. On the third day, the group provided feedback on the facts and feelings discussion trigger, toured the London Lighthouse (the workshop site), and participated in counseling role plays. Activities on the fourth day aimed to process the role plays, to develop counseling skills, and to define sexual health. Participants also played the "safer sex" game. The last day of the workshop involved role plays of exploring the situation, showing materials participants had brought with them and talking about them, future plans, and discussion of the most valuable thing learned at the workshop. Participants also made conclusions and recommendations based on discussions at the workshop.
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    092473

    Putting women's health in the picture.

    JOICFP NEWS. 1994 Jan; (235):1.

    An Information, Education, and Communication (IEC) Workshop for the Production of Video Script on Women's Health was organized by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), and JOICFP and held in Japan from November 29, through December 4, 1993. It produced 4 different prototypes for use in Asia that reflected the range of women's health issues and cultural differences involved. Representatives of family planning (FP) associations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), IEC experts, and health officials from both government and NGOs attended. Dr. Shizuko Sasaki spoke about various legal issues of women's health in Japan, while Colleen Cording spoke concerning the impact of social and policy changes on women's lives and health in New Zealand. Participants were then divided into 4 groups for discussion of target populations and their needs. 4 sets of illustrations were designed to stimulate discussion by instructors and were presented with 10-15 min scripts. The 4 videos included Christie and Me, Proud to Be a Girl, One Day at the Beach, and Happy to Be Me. The 1st film features a uterus as narrator who explains menstruation, sexually transmitted disease (STD), and contraception; the 2nd focuses on positive self images for girls; the 3rd, on a range of sexual topics discussed during a couple's seaside stroll; and the 4th, on a woman's love of self and cycle of life from puberty to old age. Participants are expected to produce similar material with adaptations to their specific countries from these prototypes. Participants also discussed their experiences in women's health education and methods of distributing and marketing educational materials.
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    081433

    Adolescent sexual and reproductive health. Report of the workshop, CIE, Paris, 8-11 July 1991.

    Brandrup-Lukanow A; Mansour S; Hawkins K

    Paris, France, Centre International de l'Enfance, 1992. 96 p.

    The risk-taking and sexual experimentation norms of adolescence place adolescents at risk of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases of increasing prevalence. Young people experience high rates of unwanted pregnancy and unsafe abortion, and others prostitute themselves and/or are sexually abused by adults and/or peers. While it is imperative that the reproductive and sexual health needs of youths be addressed and met, most societies around the world fail to meet service demand. Moreover, adults typically fail to convey clear and unbiased messages to adolescents about sexuality. Adolescents need to be empowered to make their own decisions about their individual sexuality. Messages and care about sexuality should realistically endorse sex as a natural and enjoyable part of life. A 4-day workshop on youth and sexuality was jointly organized by the French Foundation International Children Center (CIE), the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), and the German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ). It was held as a forum in which experiences from projects involving or addressing youths in various countries with different economic, cultural, and religious environments and in various settings could be shared and analyzed. It is hoped that workshops proceedings will ultimately help in the development of strategies to expand and improve services for youths worldwide. This publication of workshop proceedings includes abridged versions of the 14 papers presented, main issues addressed in the plenary and working group discussions, participant recommendations, and open questions which will require further research in the future. Youth, culture, and sexuality, baseline research, service delivery, sexuality education, evaluation, and policy issues of program development are considered, followed by a description of the organizations and a participant list. Authors may be contacted directly for additional information should the reader be so inclined. Furthermore, CIE, IPPF, and GTZ invite reader feedback on the publication.
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    081879

    Male participation in family planning: a review of programme approaches in Africa.

    Hawkins K

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 1992 Sep. 93 p.

    20 participants from 9 sub-Saharan countries and the UK discuss men's negative attitudes towards family planning (the leading obstacle to the success of family planning in Africa) at the November 1991 Workshop on Male Participation in Family Planning in The Gambia. Family planning programs have targeted women for 20 years, but they are starting to see the men's role in making fertility decisions and in transmitting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). They are trying to find ways to increase men's involvement in promoting family planning and STD prevention. Some recent research in Africa shows that many men already have a positive attitude towards family planning, but there is poor or no positive communication between husband and wife about fertility and sexuality. Some family planning programs (e.g., those in Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Ethiopia, and Zimbabwe) use information, education, and communication (IEC) activities (e.g., audiovisual material, print media, film, workshops, seminars, and songs) to promote men's sexual responsibility. IEC programs do increase knowledge, but do not necessarily change attitudes and practice. Some research indicates that awareness raising must be followed by counseling and peer promotion efforts to effect attitudinal and behavioral change. The sub-Saharan Africa programs must conduct baseline research on attitudes and a needs assessment to determine how to address men's needs. In Zambia, baseline research reveals that a man having 1 faithful partner for a lifetime is deemed negative. Common effective needs assessment methodologies are focus group discussions and individual interviews. Programs have identified various service delivery strategies to meet these needs. They are integration of family planning promotion efforts via AIDS prevention programs, income-generating schemes, employment-based programs, youth programs and peer counseling, male-to-male community-based distribution of condoms, and social marketing. Few programs have been evaluated, mainly because evaluation is not included in the planning process.
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    070600

    How to estimate incremental resource requirements and costs of alternative TT immunization strategies: a manual for health and program managers. Revised version.

    Brenzel L; Foulon G

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow, Inc. [JSI], Resources for Child Health Project [REACH], 1989 Jun. [4], 22 p. (USAID Contract No. DPE-5927-C-00-5068-00)

    The REACH Project originally prepared this manual for health and program managers for WHO workshops in Africa on the control of neonatal tetanus. The manual provides rapid methods for determining incremental resource requirements and costs of tetanus toxoid (TT) immunization programs. Its design allows for flexibility. It categorizes costs into variable costs such as vaccines, syringes, and needles and fixed costs such as training, personnel, supervision, and transportation. The manual provides a worksheet for calculating the variable costs for programs which requires the managers to consider the target population (pregnant women or women of childbearing age) and coverage objective (TT2 or TT5). Further it presents a formula for determining costs of additional personnel (a variable cost): personnel costs=number of workers x proportion of time for TT vaccination for each worker x annual gross earnings of each workers. It also has guidelines for determining fixed costs such as cold chain equipment costs. Transportation costs consists mostly of fuel costs but also includes the costs of vehicles to move vaccines, supplies, and personnel. Training costs include production of training materials, travel, per diem, and proportion of annual salaries of trainers and trainees for training time. The manual also has worksheets for determining supervision and monitoring costs. Further it has a worksheet to calculate additional media costs for TT immunization including radio. TV, and posters. Once managers have determined the costs of various components of TT immunization programs, they can sum the costs up and determine the cost effectiveness of TT immunization strategies on another worksheet. The manual concludes with a formula to assist managers determine whether changing from 1 strategy to another would save them more money and be more cost effective.
    Add to my documents.