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Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    340079
    Peer Reviewed

    The Botswana Medical Eligibility Criteria Wheel: Adapting a tool to meet the needs of Botswana's family planning program.

    Kim CR; Kidula N; Rammipi MK; Mokganya L; Gaffield ML

    African Journal of Reproductive Health. 2016 Jun; 20(2):9-12.

    In efforts to strive for family planning repositioning in Botswana, the Ministry of Health convened a meeting to undertake an adaptation of the Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use (MEC) wheel. The main objectives of this process were to present technical updates of the various contraceptive methods, to update the current medical conditions prevalent to Botswana and to adapt the MEC wheel to meet the needs of the Botswanian people. This commentary focuses on the adaptation process that occurred during the week-long stakeholder workshop. It concludes with the key elements learned from this process that can potentially inform countries who are interested in undergoing a similar exercise to strengthen their family planning needs.
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  2. 2
    321375
    Peer Reviewed

    The introduction of confidential enquiries into maternal deaths and near-miss case reviews in the WHO European region.

    Bacci A; Lewis G; Baltag V; Bertran AP

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2007 Sep; 15(30):145-152.

    Most maternal deaths can be averted with known, effective interventions but countries require information about which women are dying and why, and what can been done to prevent such deaths in future. This paper describes the introduction of two approaches to reviewing maternal deaths and severe obstetric complications in 12 countries in transition in the WHO European Region - national-level confidential enquiries into maternal deaths and facility-based near-miss case reviews. Initially, two regional meetings involving stakeholders from 12 countries were held in 2004-2005, followed by national meetings in seven of the countries. The Republic of Moldova was the first to pilot the review process, preceded by a technical workshop to make detailed plans, provide training in how to facilitate and carry out a review, finalise clinical guidelines against which the findings of the confidential enquiry and near-miss case review could be judged, and a range of other preparatory work. To date, near-miss case reviews have been carried out in the three main referral hospitals in Moldova, and a national committee appointed by the Ministry of Health to conduct the confidential enquiry has met twice. Several other countries have begun a similar process, but progress may remain slow due to continuing fears of punitive actions against health professionals who have a mother or baby die in their care. (author's)
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  3. 3
    320924

    Policy Workshop on HIV / AIDS and Family Well-being, Windhoek, Namibia, 28-30 January 2004.

    United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs

    [New York, New York], United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 2004. 21 p.

    The Policy Workshop was organized by the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs and hosted by the Government of Namibia, National Planning Commission Secretariat. It was held at Windhoek, Namibia. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together representatives of governments and non-governmental organizations as well as academic experts and practitioners from various countries in southern Africa to discuss the impact of HIV/AIDS on families in the region, to consider how families and communities are coping with the disease, and to contribute to the development of a strategic policy framework to assist Governments to strengthen the capacity of families and family networks to cope. In order to compare experience across regions, a participant from Eastern Europe was also invited to the workshop. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    305666

    WHO training course for TB consultants: RPM Plus drug management sessions in Sondalo, Italy. Trip report: May 17-20, 2006.

    Barillas E

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2006 May 29. 33 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-499; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    WHO, Stop-TB Partners, and NGOs that support country programs for DOTS implementation and expansion require capable consultants in assessing the capacity of countries to manage TB pharmaceuticals in their programs, developing interventions, and providing direct technical assistance to improve availability and accessibility of quality TB medicines. Beginning in 2001, RPM Plus, in addition to its own formal courses on pharmaceutical management for tuberculosis, has contributed modules and facilitated sessions on specific aspects of pharmaceutical management to the WHO Courses for TB Consultants in Sondalo. The WHO TB Course for TB Consultants was developed and initiated in 2001 by the WHO-Collaborating Centre for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, the S. Maugeri Foundation, the Morelli Hospital, and TB CTA. The main goal of the course is to increase the pool of international level TB consultants. As of December 2005, over 150 international TB consultants have participated in the training, a majority of whom have already been employed in consultancy activities by the WHO and international donors. In 2006 fiscal year RPM Plus received funds from USAID to continue supporting the Sondalo Course, which will allow RPM Plus to facilitate sessions on pharmaceutical management for TB at four courses in May, June, July, and October of 2006. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    297229

    Adapted for use in former Soviet countries, WHO/US government PMTCT protocols are introduced in three Russian cities.

    Connections. 2005 Aug-Sep; [3] p..

    HIV/AIDS is called a women's disease in African countries because almost 60 percent of the people infected with the virus are women. This comparison may soon also be relevant for Russia where the relative share of women among people with HIV is rising steadily. In some regions it is already in excess of 40 percent. Russian experts attribute this situation to the development of the commercial sex trade, as well as to a rising rate of transmission through sexual contact with drug users. The gravest situation is the escalating incidence of HIV/AIDS among women of childbearing age, especially those between 15 and 30. More and more cases of the disease are being reported in this group. Many of them are diagnosed during pregnancy, which translates to a corresponding increase the number of HIV-infected children in Russia. At the start of 2005, approximately 10,000 such children had been registered, whereas in 1996 there were only 18 of them. While it is practically impossible to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS among adults, mother-to-child transmission of the virus can be controlled. The question, "How?" is complex and multifaceted. It was discussed in detail by participants in a series of workshops sponsored by UNICEF and AIHA in three Russian cities-- Magnitogorsk, Orenburg, and Chelyabinsk--between May and August this year. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    297156

    Odessa workshop helps build capacity among Ukrainian clinicians who care for people living with HIV / AIDS.

    Connections. 2004 Jan; [2] p..

    A recent Anti-retroviral Therapy Training Workshop held in Odessa, Ukraine, marked the start of an ongoing collaboration between AIHA and the Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF). It was the first training hosted under the aegis of the newly established World Health Organization Regional HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment Knowledge Hub for which AIHA is the primary implementing partner. This Knowledge Hub was created in response to the burgeoning HIV/AIDS pandemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia to serve as a crucial capacity-building mechanism for reaching WHO's "3 by 5" targets for the region. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    183948

    [Activities of the Oficina Provincial de la Mujer for the prevention of adolescent pregnancies continue] Siguen actividades de la Mujer en prevencion de embarazos en adolescentes.

    Logros. 1999 Nov-Dec; 4(1):9.

    The Provincial Office for Women, in coordination with the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), has given several workshops for mayors, health workers, political leaders, agronomists, and others. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    180793

    First regional meeting in Honduras.

    Groennings S

    Civil-Military Alliance Newsletter. 1997 Oct; 3(4):3-4.

    The Alliance held its first Regional Seminar in Central America July 2-5,1997, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. This was the first meeting held within the framework of the two- year Alliance program in Latin America supported by the Commission of the European Union. The theme was "Civil- Military Intervention Strategies for the Prevention and Control of HIV/AIDS in Latin America and the Caribbean." (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    131647

    Planning for a multi-site study of health careseeking behavior in relation to IMCI, November 4-11, 1997.

    Bhattacharyya K; Burkhalter BR

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival [BASICS], 1997. [8] p. (Report; USAID Contract No. HRN-C-00-93-00031-00)

    This trip report pertains to a 1-week workshop held during November 4-11, 1997. The purpose of the workshop was to plan a study of healthcare-seeking behavior in Mexico, Ghana, and Sri Lanka. The study would develop a community and facility link as part of the WHO Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) initiative. The theoretical framework identifies four types of maternal behavior (recognition, labeling, resorting to care, and compliance) and four types of channels (paid community health workers, volunteer health workers, mother support groups, and informal support from family and others). Project funding would be supplied by WHO. BASICS has the opportunity to collaborate with WHO and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine on the study, which is highly relevant to its work with behavior change and IMCI. The workshop was attended by about 18 persons and included teams from the three study sites. The workshop included presentations, plenary discussions, and small group sessions. The organizing committee prepared a review of the literature on healthcare-seeking behavior, evaluation techniques, WHO protocols for multi-center studies, targets, and budgets. Representatives from the sites prepared an overview of health conditions at their sites and some ideas for the study plan and intervention. The subgroups developed specific draft study plans, which were presented to the plenary. Final proposals are due in Geneva by November 30, 1998. BASICS will develop a review of mother support groups and provide position papers to sites.
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  10. 10
    110804

    Report on WHO's first course to train consultants for Management of Childhood Illness, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, November 13 to December 2, 1995.

    Pond B

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, 1995. [5] p. (Trip Report; BASICS Technical Directive: 000 HT 53 014; USAID Contract No. HRN-6006-C-00-3031-00)

    The World Health Organization's Division of Diarrheal and Acute Respiratory Disease Control (WHO-CDR) and its partners have prepared the Management of Childhood Illness course, which trains health workers in optimal outpatient management of the leading causes of child death: pneumonia, diarrhea, malnutrition, measles, and malaria. During November 13-24, 1995, WHO-CDR held a training course in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, for consultants in Management of Childhood Illness. Following the course, a subset of the consultants participated in a series of workshops on preparations for introducing the course and adapting it to correspond to national policies. WHO-CDR has officially released the materials for training in integrated outpatient management of childhood illness. They include the training materials for participants, the Course Director's Guide, the Facilitator's Guides, three videos, a paper entitled Where Referral Is Not Possible, the Adaptation Guide, and a document entitled Initial Planning by Countries for Integrated Management of Childhood Illness. Preparation needs for use of the course include adaptation of the course to correspond to national policies, organization of training sites, and training of highly qualified facilitators. Complementary training materials are needed for health workers with less formal education, for instruction in inpatient management, and for training private-for-profit health workers. Training must correspond to system-wide changes (e.g., in drug supply and in supervision). The project must extend to the home and community to improve the care for sick children. Training specialists, communications specialists, public health managers, policy makers, and parents of sick children need to be included so as to expand understanding of and support for the initiative in order to complete the unfinished tasks.
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  11. 11
    097674

    IBFAN Africa training initiatives: code implementation and lactation management.

    Mbuli A

    MOTHERS AND CHILDREN. 1994; 13(1):5.

    As part of an ongoing effort to halt the decline of breast feeding rates in Africa, 35 representatives of 12 different African countries met in Mangochi, Malawi, in February 1994. The Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes was scrutinized. National codes were drafted based on the "Model Law" of the IBFAN Code Documentation Centre (ICDC), Penang. Mechanisms of implementation, specific to each country, were developed. Strategies for the promotion, protection, and support of breast feeding, which is very important to child survival in Africa, were discussed. The training course was organized by ICDC, in conjunction with IBFAN Africa, and with the support of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Countries in eastern, central, and southern Africa were invited to send participants, who included professors, pediatricians, nutritionists, MCH personnel, nurses, and lawyers. IBFAN Africa has also been conducting lactation management workshops for a number of years in African countries. 26 health personnel (pediatricians, nutritionists, senior nursing personnel, and MCH workers), representing 7 countries in the southern African region, attended a training of trainers lactation management workshop in Swaziland in August, 1993 with the support of their UNICEF country offices. The workshop included lectures, working sessions, discussions, and slide and video presentations. Topics covered included national nutrition statuses, the importance of breast feeding, the anatomy and physiology of breast feeding, breast feeding problems, the International Code of Marketing, counseling skills, and training methods. The field trip to a training course covering primary health care that was run by the Traditional Healers Organization (THO) in Swaziland was of particular interest because of the strong traditional medicine sector in many African countries. IBFAN Africa encourages use of community workers (traditional healers, Rural Health Motivators, Village Health Workers, Mother Support Groups) to promote breast feeding.
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