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  1. 1
    327448

    Strengthening the Education Sector Response to HIV and AIDS in the Caribbean. UNESCO / WB partnership in support of CARICOM strategy in education and HIV and AIDS.

    Bundy DA; Fontani P; Ruiz Devesa D; O'Connell TE; Babb J

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2007 Dec 14. 29 p.

    This report presents the findings and outcomes of the three joint UNESCO/WB missions to Guyana, Jamaica and St. Lucia, and elaborates on next steps identified for action at both national and regional levels. The report also sets these findings and next steps within the broader context of the Caribbean plan for action and presents in its appendices, sample resources to guide the development of a comprehensive response to HIV & AIDS by the education sector.
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  2. 2
    286913

    Working in partnership to boost reproductive health commodity security. [Trabajar en sociedad para mejorar la seguridad de los productos de salud reproductiva]

    Abrams T

    Population 2005. 2004 Sep-Oct; 6(3):10-11.

    As USAID, through its sub-contracted American NGO John Snow Incorporated (JSI), continues to phase out support to developing countries for reproductive health commodities— contraceptives and essential drugs—the UN Population Fund and interested donor bodies are concerned with how best to marshal and direct commodity assistance for the future. The current focus is on nine countries in the Latin American region: Bolivia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay and Peru. To ensure a smooth transition and to help these countries to eventually achieve reproductive health commodity security, or RHCS, USAID and JSI are working closely with partners, including UNFPA, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Bank. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    179712

    [A guide to providing reproductive health services] Guia para prestacao de services em saude reprodutiva.

    Brazil. Ceara. Secretaria da Saude. Programma Viva Mulher; Brazil. Ceara. Secretaria da Saude. Programa de Saude do Adolescente

    Fortaleza, Brazil, Secretaria da Saude, 1998. xxvi, 432 p.

    The Viva Mulher [Healthy Woman] Program developed by the Secretariat of Health of the State of Ceará (SESA-CE), in partnership with several local, national and international institutions, was conceived after recognition of the unfavorable health situation of women throughout the State. Sensitized by the size of the problem and encouraged by other successful initiatives, such as the Community Health Agent program and the Healthy Child program, the results of which were translated into a reduction in infant mortality and an increase in the coverage of Basic Health Actions, the State Government resolved to promote a broad mobilization of institutions interested in the problems so as to develop intensive joint efforts involving society as a whole in an attempt to make a significant change in the health profile of women in Ceará. The first concrete act was the holding of the "Woman, Health, Life" seminar in Fortaleza in August 1992, which had more than 1,000 participants, to launch the Healthy Woman program on the basis of directives from the Ministry of Health (PAISM). The Healthy Woman program was associated from the beginning with the United Nations Population Fund (FNUAP), which proposed to offer technical assistance and financial resources through a four-year cooperation project with the State Government. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), collaborating agencies of the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID) and other international entities later joined in the process and have been cooperating in various complementary manners. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    129379

    Turning a vision into reality.

    FAMILY PLANNING NEWS. 1996; 12(2):2.

    This article is based on a speech presented at an International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) seminar to volunteers and staff. The speech was given by the secretary general of the IPPF, Mrs. Ingar Brueggemann. She stressed that complacency was not appropriate. The concepts of sexual and reproductive health need to be implemented. IPPF must act as the conscience of the people and the voice for the underprivileged. IPPF must ensure that governments understand the concept of reproductive health and its importance. IPPF's "Vision 2000" published in 1992 emphasizes the empowerment of women, a focus on youth needs, reductions in unsafe abortion, prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, greater attention to safe motherhood, and increased programs in sexual and reproductive health. All women must have the basic right to make free and informed choices regarding their sexual and reproductive health and the satisfaction of unmet need for quality family planning services and sexual and reproductive health services, particularly for the disadvantaged groups in society. Africa has the greatest needs. Estimated maternal mortality is over 600 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. The maternal death rate in some countries may be close to 1200 per 100,000 live births. Africa also practices female genital mutilation, and the practice is widespread. Average life expectancy is around 50 years of age. The average African modern contraceptive use rate is about 10%. Botswana, Kenya, and Zimbabwe have recently made progress in rapidly increasing the modern contraceptive use rates. Africa may also have about 66% of the world's HIV/AIDS cases. Funding will be needed to advance programs in sexual and reproductive health. However, the shift of funds from supporting one soldier would pay for the education of 100 children. The cost of one jet fighter would pay for equipping 50,000 village pharmacies.
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  5. 5
    092835

    Commission on Sustainable Development: year-end update.

    Chasek P; Goree LJ 6th

    EARTH NEGOTIATIONS BULLETIN. 1993 Dec 21; 5(13):1-6.

    The second meeting of the Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) will be held in May 1994. A workshop on the transfer and development of environmentally sound technologies was held in October 1993 in Norway. Over 40 professionals attended the environmental technology workshops on supply and demand issues and new initiatives. Priority was given to information and training needs among decision-makers in the South about management in the North, the need for benchmarking at the firm level, upgrading of environmental standards, documentation of environmentally-oriented technical assistance, and ineffective regulation. There is a clear need for a global financial tool for addressing local problems. Research is needed that defines the nature of environmental problems and documents new innovations and improvements in methodology. The November 1993 Colombia Conference on Technology Transfer focused on processes that "minimize, treat, recycle, and minimize liquid waste and environmentally sound technologies for efficient generation and use of energy for households and small industries." Proposals were offered to improve access to information, monitor discharges and assess risk, improve regulatory mechanisms, finance the acquisition of technology, and strengthen institutions in receiving countries. The Global Environmental Facility (GEF) failed to restructure when negotiations stalled on the issue of the appropriate ratio of seats between countries and who would chair the GEF Executive Council. The GEF was set up to fund activities on global warming, biological diversity, ozone depletion, and international waters. This failure may result in an end to operations in mid-1994, but the failure is not definite. The General Assembly debates about CSD are briefly summarized by country.
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