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    308260

    Learning by inquiry: sexual and reproductive health field experiences from CARE in Asia.

    Fletcher G; Magar V; Noij F

    Atlanta, Georgia, CARE, 2005 Jun. 32 p. (Sexual and Reproductive Health Working Paper Series No. 1)

    In other words, keep digging below the surface. Getting rid of a thorny plant means digging right to the roots; it is not enough to just cut back the branches! But sometimes, fears of "getting it wrong" and other work pressures can leave staff unsure of how to deal with questions like: What do we really know about what is happening at field level? Do our project designs really achieve their intended effect? Why are we implementing projects this way? How do social and personal relationships in and around the project work? Who holds what power? Are we contributing enough to the creation of positive change in people's lives? How could we do more? These are not easy questions - and there are no simple answers. But by asking such questions throughout the project cycle, and looking for answers and amending work as a result, staff can increase project impact. Making one set of changes, however, is not enough. Staff must keep asking questions. Do the changes work? If so, who do they benefit? How? Where is the power now? Have inequities changed? And what else can be done to create greater change in people's lives? This approach is often referred to as "reflective learning," or learning by inquiry. It is closely linked with organizational learning. (excerpt)
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