Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 7 Results

  1. 1
    308260

    Learning by inquiry: sexual and reproductive health field experiences from CARE in Asia.

    Fletcher G; Magar V; Noij F

    Atlanta, Georgia, CARE, 2005 Jun. 32 p. (Sexual and Reproductive Health Working Paper Series No. 1)

    In other words, keep digging below the surface. Getting rid of a thorny plant means digging right to the roots; it is not enough to just cut back the branches! But sometimes, fears of "getting it wrong" and other work pressures can leave staff unsure of how to deal with questions like: What do we really know about what is happening at field level? Do our project designs really achieve their intended effect? Why are we implementing projects this way? How do social and personal relationships in and around the project work? Who holds what power? Are we contributing enough to the creation of positive change in people's lives? How could we do more? These are not easy questions - and there are no simple answers. But by asking such questions throughout the project cycle, and looking for answers and amending work as a result, staff can increase project impact. Making one set of changes, however, is not enough. Staff must keep asking questions. Do the changes work? If so, who do they benefit? How? Where is the power now? Have inequities changed? And what else can be done to create greater change in people's lives? This approach is often referred to as "reflective learning," or learning by inquiry. It is closely linked with organizational learning. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    305666

    WHO training course for TB consultants: RPM Plus drug management sessions in Sondalo, Italy. Trip report: May 17-20, 2006.

    Barillas E

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2006 May 29. 33 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-499; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    WHO, Stop-TB Partners, and NGOs that support country programs for DOTS implementation and expansion require capable consultants in assessing the capacity of countries to manage TB pharmaceuticals in their programs, developing interventions, and providing direct technical assistance to improve availability and accessibility of quality TB medicines. Beginning in 2001, RPM Plus, in addition to its own formal courses on pharmaceutical management for tuberculosis, has contributed modules and facilitated sessions on specific aspects of pharmaceutical management to the WHO Courses for TB Consultants in Sondalo. The WHO TB Course for TB Consultants was developed and initiated in 2001 by the WHO-Collaborating Centre for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, the S. Maugeri Foundation, the Morelli Hospital, and TB CTA. The main goal of the course is to increase the pool of international level TB consultants. As of December 2005, over 150 international TB consultants have participated in the training, a majority of whom have already been employed in consultancy activities by the WHO and international donors. In 2006 fiscal year RPM Plus received funds from USAID to continue supporting the Sondalo Course, which will allow RPM Plus to facilitate sessions on pharmaceutical management for TB at four courses in May, June, July, and October of 2006. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    300914

    GBV communication skills manual. Communication Skills in Working with Survivors of Gender-based Violence: a five-day training of trainers workshop.

    Family Health International [FHI]; Reproductive Health Response in Conflict Consortium; International Rescue Committee

    [New York, New York], Reproductive Health Response in Conflict Consortium, [2003]. [194] p.

    This curriculum represents collaboration between FHI, the RHRC Consortium, and the IRC. The original curriculum used in Peja, Kosovo, has been supplemented and refined in subsequent trainings by FHI, as well as by the work of IRC's Sophie Read-Hamilton in Tanzania and Sierra Leone. The curriculum presented here has been finalized by Jeanne Ward of the RHRC Consortium, with feedback from FHI and IRC. What follows is an outline of the overall goals of the training, a training outline, and a list of materials needed, as well as a list of transparencies, handouts, and activity sheets used in the training, an indepth training curriculum, and all transparencies, handouts, and activity sheets necessary to conduct a training. The training is designed so that all the materials used in the training can be shared with participants at the end of the workshop (preferably in a binder), and they can conduct subsequent trainings on topics with which they feel comfortable. Participants are not expected to be able to train on the entire contents of the manual unless they have extensive training and psychosocial experience. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    285398

    Promoting the participation of indigenous women in World Bank-funded social sector projects: an evaluation study in Mexico. [Promoción de la participación de las mujeres indígenas en los proyectos del sector social fundados por el Banco Mundial: estudio de evaluación en México]

    Trasparencia

    Washington, D.C., International Center for Research on Women [ICRW], Promoting Women in Development [PROWID], 1999. 4 p. (Report-in-Brief; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. FAO-A-00-95-00030-00)

    Mexico has long been one of the World Bank’s primary clients and is currently its largest cumulative borrower, with loan commitments of up to $5.5 billion approved for 1997-99 (World Bank 1996). During the past 15 years, the focus of the Bank’s lending program in Mexico has shifted away from structural adjustment towards poverty reduction, a strategy that emphasizes investment in health and education. As elsewhere around the world, gender differences in these sectors in Mexico are prevalent with regard to access to and control over resources and decision-making. Given the multiple roles that women play in production, reproduction, child rearing, and household maintenance, social sector projects that target women generate economic and social benefits both for individuals and countries as a whole. Consequently, the Bank has increasingly funded projects that aim to strengthen the participation and position of women in development. The Bank’s publications, official policies, and project guidelines also acknowledge the importance and benefits of promoting women’s roles and empowerment (Women’s Eyes on the World Bank, U.S. 1997; World Bank 1994, 1995, 1997). However, little has been done to evaluate what resources and opportunities are needed to improve the actual standing and participation of women in both Bank-funded programs and society as a whole. While the Bank launched a Gender Action Plan for Central America and Mexico in 1996, this Plan does not clearly define gender impact and assumes that strategies aimed at communities will affect men and women in similar ways. Further, the Bank’s effectiveness in applying its own guidelines on gender and community participation to policy, project design, and implementation on the ground has not been systematically assessed. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    183255

    Report on field test of the WHO Decision-Making Tool (DMT) for family planning clients and providers in Mexico. Draft. [Informe sobre pruebas de campo de la Herramienta de toma de decisiones (DMT, Decision-Making Tool) de la OMS para los clientes y prestadores de planificación familiar en México. Versión preliminar]

    Kim YM; Martin T; Johnson S; Church K; Rinehart W

    [Unpublished] 2003 Apr 13. 8 p.

    To test the usefulness of the flipchart on the quality of counseling, this study compared videotaped counseling sessions conducted by the same providers before and after they were trained to use the DMT and had practice using it. Data were collected at two points in time: a baseline round before the intervention began and a post-intervention round one month after providers were trained to use the DMT. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with providers and clients to complement the data from videotaped sessions. Participating in the study were 17 providers working at nine Secretary of Health facilities of the Government of Mexico, D.F. They included 9 doctors, 4 nurses, 3 social workers, and 1 psychologist. Eight of the participating facilities were hospitals, and one was a health center. At each facility, one doctor who routinely provided family planning services participated in the study. In some facilities, a nurse, social worker, or psychologist, each of whom routinely provided FP services, also participated in the study. Each provider was videotaped with about 8 clients, that is, 4 clients per round of data collection. Each set of 4 clients included one new client with a contraceptive method in mind, one new client without a method in mind, one returning client with a problem, and one returning client without a problem. Only 13 of the 17 providers had complete data from both the baseline and post-intervention rounds. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    183254

    Report on the field test of the WHO Decision-Making Tool (DMT) for family planning clients and providers in Indonesia. Draft.

    Kim YM; Church K; Hendriati A; Saraswati I; Rosdiana D

    [Unpublished] 2003 May 14. 11 p.

    This field test assessed the acceptability and usability of the Decision-making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers (DMT) in ten Puskesmas (public clinics) in two districts of West Java province in Indonesia. The study was conducted by the INFO Project at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Communication Programs (CCP) in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) and CCP's STARH Program in Indonesia. The assessment focused on the following areas: the comprehensibility, usability, and acceptability of the DMT among providers and clients; how the DMT can facilitate or hinder the family planning (FP) counseling process; how the DMT can help clients make appropriate decisions in order to solve problems regarding FP; how providers integrate the flipchart into their daily work; and changes needed to increase the impact of the DMT on the FP decision-making process and client-provider communication. WHO, the Population Information Program at CCP (now the INFO Project), and INTRAH developed a normative model of client-provider communication to provide a theoretical foundation for improving FP counseling. Drawing upon this model, the Promoting Family Planning team of the Department of Reproductive Health and Research at the WHO and CCP created the DMT in a flipchart format. The tool seeks to improve the quality of counseling by: promoting informed choice and participation by clients during family planning service delivery; facilitating providers' application of evidence-based best practices in client-provider interaction; and providing the technical information clients need in order to make optimal choices and to use contraceptive methods. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    073671

    Selected UNFPA-funded projects executed by the WHO/South East Asian regional office (SEARO).

    Sobrevilla L; Deville W; Reddy N

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [1992]. v, 69, [2] p. (Evaluation Report)

    In 1991, a mission in India, Bhutan and Nepal evaluated UNFPA/WHO South East Asian Regional Office (SEARO) maternal and child health/family planning (MCH/FP) projects. The Regional Advisory Team in MCH/FP Project (RT) placed more emphasis on the MCH component than the FP component. It included all priority areas identified in 1984, but did not include management until 1988. In fact, it delayed recruiting a technical officer and recruited someone who was unqualified and who performed poorly. SEARO improved cooperation between RT and community health units and named the team leader as regional adviser for family health. The RT team did not promote itself very well, however, Member countries and UNFPA did request technical assistance from RT for MCH/FP projects, especially operations research. RT also set up fruitful intercountry workshops. The team did not put much effort in training, adolescent health, and transfer of technology, though. Further RT project management was still weak. Overall SEARO had been able to follow the policies of governments, but often its advisors did not follow UNFPA guidelines when helping countries plan the design and strategy of country projects. Delays in approval were common in all the projects reviewed by the mission. Furthermore previous evaluations also identified this weakness. In addition, a project in Bhutan addressed mothers' concerns but ignored other women's roles such as managers of households and wage earners. Besides, little was done to include women's participation in health sector decision making at the basic health unit and at the central health ministry. In Nepal, institution building did not include advancement for women or encourage proactive role roles of qualified women medical professionals. In Bhutan, but not Nepal, fellowships and study tours helped increase the number of trained personnel attending intercountry activities.
    Add to my documents.