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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    331627

    Developing and testing strategies for increasing awareness of the IUDas a contraceptive option.

    Vernon R; Khan ME; Birungi H; Askew I; Stones W

    [Washington, D.C.], Population Council, Frontiers in Reproductive Health, 2007 Dec. 21 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-98-00012-00)

    Much of the programmatic and research experience gained over the past two decades has focused on increasing understanding of supply-side factors that limit the provision and use of the IUD, for example, developing training programs, demonstrating the ability of lower level medical staff to provide the method, and assessing the interaction between IUDs, STIs and, more recently, HIV. There is now sufficient empirical evidence from a range of settings to allow program managers and technical assistance organizations to develop guidelines and plans for strengthening the systems necessary to support country-level introduction or 'rehabilitation'; of the IUD within a program offering a range of contraceptive choices. The objectives were: To conduct a meeting of researchers and program managers from three continents and several international organizations to review reasons for under-utilization of the IUD and recent experiences in increasing awareness about the IUD; To develop proposals for operations research projects to test the most promising interventions to introduce and expand access to IUD services and to implement the projects with national partner organizations; To disseminate results of the successful strategies. (Excerpts]
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  2. 2
    327448

    Strengthening the Education Sector Response to HIV and AIDS in the Caribbean. UNESCO / WB partnership in support of CARICOM strategy in education and HIV and AIDS.

    Bundy DA; Fontani P; Ruiz Devesa D; O'Connell TE; Babb J

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2007 Dec 14. 29 p.

    This report presents the findings and outcomes of the three joint UNESCO/WB missions to Guyana, Jamaica and St. Lucia, and elaborates on next steps identified for action at both national and regional levels. The report also sets these findings and next steps within the broader context of the Caribbean plan for action and presents in its appendices, sample resources to guide the development of a comprehensive response to HIV & AIDS by the education sector.
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  3. 3
    322581

    Implementing the UN learning strategy on HIV / AIDS: sixteen case studies.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007 Mar. 97 p. (UNAIDS/07.08E; JC1311E)

    In April 2003, the Committee of Cosponsoring Organizations of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) approved a Learning Strategy to help UN system staff develop competence on HIV and AIDS. The goals of the Learning Strategy are: to develop the knowledge and competence of the UN and its staff so that they are able to best support national responses to HIV and AIDS; and to ensure that all UN staff members are able to make informed decisions to protect themselves from HIV and, if they are infected or affected by HIV, to ensure that they know where to turn for the best possible care and treatment. This includes ensuring that staff members fully understand the UN's HIV and AIDS workplace policies and how they are implemented. To support UN country teams to implement the Learning Strategy, Learning Facilitators were selected at country level and trained in a series of regional workshops. The Learning Facilitators were then expected to ensure - along with the country teams-that the standards of the Learning Strategy were realized. This report is comprised of UN HIV/AIDS Learning Strategy case studies from sixteen countries: Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, India, Indonesia, Macedonia, Madagascar, Morocco, Nigeria, the Pan American Health Organization headquarters (United States), Pakistan, Paraguay, Vienna (Austria), Viet Nam, and Yemen. It presents each country's unique experience in implementing the strategy since its adoption in 2003. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    321122

    Engaging faith-based organizations in HIV prevention. A training manual for programme managers.

    Toure A; Melek M; Jato M; Kane M; Kajungu R

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2007. [53] p.

    The influence behind faith-based organizations is not difficult to discern. In many developing countries, FBOs not only provide spiritual guidance to their followers; they are often the primary providers for a variety of local health and social services. Situated within communities and building on relationships of trust, these organizations have the ability to influence the attitudes and behaviours of their fellow community members. Moreover, they are in close and regular contact with all age groups in society and their word is respected. In fact, in some traditional communities, religious leaders are often more influential than local government officials or secular community leaders. Many of the case studies researched for the UNFPA publication Culture Matters showed that the involvement of faith-based organizations in UNFPA-supported projects enhanced negotiations with governments and civil society on culturally sensitive issues. Gradually, these experiences are being shared across countries andacross regions, which has facilitated interfaith dialogue on the most effective approaches to prevent the spread of HIV. Such dialogue has also helped convince various faith-based organizations that joining together as a united front is the most effective way to fight the spread of HIV and lessen the impact of AIDS. This manual is a capacity-building tool to help policy makers and programmers identify, design and follow up on HIV prevention programmes undertaken by FBOs. The manual can also be used by development practitioners partnering with FBOs to increase their understanding of the role of FBOs in HIV prevention, and to design plans for partnering with FBOs to halt the spread of the virus. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    321375
    Peer Reviewed

    The introduction of confidential enquiries into maternal deaths and near-miss case reviews in the WHO European region.

    Bacci A; Lewis G; Baltag V; Bertran AP

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2007 Sep; 15(30):145-152.

    Most maternal deaths can be averted with known, effective interventions but countries require information about which women are dying and why, and what can been done to prevent such deaths in future. This paper describes the introduction of two approaches to reviewing maternal deaths and severe obstetric complications in 12 countries in transition in the WHO European Region - national-level confidential enquiries into maternal deaths and facility-based near-miss case reviews. Initially, two regional meetings involving stakeholders from 12 countries were held in 2004-2005, followed by national meetings in seven of the countries. The Republic of Moldova was the first to pilot the review process, preceded by a technical workshop to make detailed plans, provide training in how to facilitate and carry out a review, finalise clinical guidelines against which the findings of the confidential enquiry and near-miss case review could be judged, and a range of other preparatory work. To date, near-miss case reviews have been carried out in the three main referral hospitals in Moldova, and a national committee appointed by the Ministry of Health to conduct the confidential enquiry has met twice. Several other countries have begun a similar process, but progress may remain slow due to continuing fears of punitive actions against health professionals who have a mother or baby die in their care. (author's)
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  6. 6
    320992
    Peer Reviewed

    Surgical services in low-income and middle-income countries.

    Spiegel DA; Gosselin RA

    Lancet. 2007 Sep 22; 370(9592):1013-1015.

    Although substantial progress has been made in addressing the burden of communicable and vaccine-preventable diseases in low-income and middle-income countries, the burden of diseases that are surgically treatable is increasing and has been neglected. Both morbidity and mortality from surgically preventable (eg, elective hernia repair) or treatable (eg, strangulated hernia) disorders can be greatly decreased through simple surgical interventions. Why should a child die from appendicitis, or a mother and child succumb to obstructed labour, when simple surgical procedures can save their lives? Why should patients suffer permanent disability because of congenital abnormalities, fractures, burns, or the sequelae of acute infections such as septic arthritis or osteomyelitis? Many complications of HIV infection (eg, abscesses, fistulas, Kaposi sarcoma) are also amenable to simple surgical interventions. Available epidemiological information and experiential evidence lend support to the conclusion that basic surgical and anaesthetic services should be integrated into primary health-care packages. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    316679
    Peer Reviewed

    Access to sexual and reproductive health services: Rights, priorities, commitments and actions.

    Edouard L; Shaw D

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2007 Jun; 97(3):227-228.

    The Alliance for Women's Health is a FIGO-based interagency consortium, comprising the World Health Organization, United Nations Population Fund, World Bank, UNICEF, International Planned Parenthood Federation, International Confederation of Midwives and International Pediatric Association. In conjunction with the XVIII World Congress of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Kuala Lumpur in November 2006, the Alliance held a precongress workshop examining access in five priority emerging issues: human papillomavirus vaccine/cervical cancer screening, emergency contraception, adolescent reproductive health, emergency obstetric care and sexually transmitted infections. Reports from the five working groups, published in this and subsequent issues of the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, provide current evidence-based recommendations on improving access to sexual and reproductive health services supported by applicable rights. The World Bank presented a framework for the discussion during theopening plenary session. The importance of sexual and reproductive health services is well recognized and was articulated in the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development which was held in Cairo in 1994. However, the inclusion of universal access to reproductive health as a target for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) only occurred in October 2006 after prolonged negotiations reflecting the reluctance, in circles of influence, to provide support where there are certain sociopolitical sensitivities. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    310571
    Peer Reviewed

    Cluster randomised trial of an active, multifaceted educational intervention based on the WHO Reproductive Health Library to improveobstetric practices.

    Gulmezoglu AM; Langer A; Piaggio G; Lumbiganon P; Villar J

    BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 2007 Jan; 114(1):16-23.

    We conducted a trial to evaluate the effect of an active, multifaceted educational strategy to promote the use of the WHO Reproductive Health Library (RHL) on obstetric practices. Design: Cluster randomised trial. The trial was assigned the International Standardised Randomised Controlled Trial Number ISRCTN14055385. Settings: Twenty-two hospitals in Mexico City and 18 in the Northeast region of Thailand. The intervention consisted primarily of three interactive workshops using RHL over a period of 6 months. The focus of the workshops was to provide access to knowledge and enable its use. A computer and support for using both the computer and RHL were provided at each hospital. The control hospitals did not receive any intervention. The main outcome measures were changes in ten selected clinical practices as recommended in RHL starting approximately four to six months after the third workshop. Clinical practice data were collected at each hospital from 1000 consecutively delivered women or for a 6-month period whichever was reached sooner. The active, multifaceted educational intervention we employed did not affect the ten targeted practices in a consistent and substantive way. Iron/folate supplementation, uterotonic use after birth and breastfeeding on demand were already frequently practiced, and we were unable to measure external cephalic version. Of the remaining six practices, selective, as opposed to routine episiotomy policy increased in the intervention group (difference in adjusted mean rate = 5.3%; 95% CI -0.1 to 10.7%) in Thailand, and there was a trend towards an increased use of antibiotics at caesarean section in Mexico (difference in adjusted mean rate = 19.0%; 95% CI: -8.0 to 46.0%). There were no differences in the use of labour companionship, magnesium sulphate use for eclampsia, corticosteroids for women delivering before 34 weeks and vacuum extraction. RHL awareness (24.8- 65.5% in Mexico and 33.9-83.3% in Thailand) and use (4.8-34.9% in Mexico and 15.5-76.4% in Thailand) increased substantially after the intervention in both countries. The multifaceted, active strategy to provide health workers with the knowledge and skills to use RHL to improve their practice led to increased access to and use of RHL, however, no consistent or substantive changes in clinical practices were detected within 4-6 months after the third workshop. (author's)
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