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Your search found 17 Results

  1. 1
    374572

    Reporting on gender-based violence in the Syria crisis: facilitator’s guide.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2016 Apr. 78 p.

    This training manual enables a journalist or other trainer to conduct a two- or three-day training workshop. The first part of the curriculum begins with training and group discussion about basic concepts and principles that will help participants develop a clear understanding of the meaning of the term ‘gender-based violence’. The programme continues with detailed information about the consequences of gender-based violence and the survivor support services needed. The trainer will also cover the causes and contributing factors, shining a light on prevention and how best to develop effective prevention strategies. The second part of the curriculum focuses on the ethical principles of reporting on gender-based violence, including what to do and what to avoid. It also includes tips for the journalists to consider during interviews and when to report on gender-based violence related issues.
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  2. 2
    337844

    Health in all policies: training manual.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2015. [271] p.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) calls on enhanced global efforts to improve health in some of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable communities by tackling the root causes of disease and health inequalities. In order to address this and to spur up action, raise awareness and facilitate implementation of a Health in All Policies (HiAP) approach WHO launched this week a Health in All Policies training manual. This manual is a training resource to increase understanding of the importance of Health in All Policies among health and other professionals. The material will form the basis of 2- and 3-day workshops, which will: build capacity to promote, implement and evaluate HiAP; encourage engagement and collaboration across sectors; facilitate the exchange of experiences and lessons learned; promote regional and global collaboration on HiAP; and promote dissemination of skills to develop training courses for trainers.
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  3. 3
    337115

    Road-mapping a total market approach for family planning and reproductive health commodity security. Workshop materials.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; PATH

    Seattle, Washington, PATH, 2013. [40] p.

    To meet the challenge of sustaining reproductive health commodity security in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the United Nations Population Fund and PATH developed workshops to increase awareness about total market approaches and develop an action plan for the region. These workshop materials are from two regional workshops that were held in April 2013.
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  4. 4
    327448

    Strengthening the Education Sector Response to HIV and AIDS in the Caribbean. UNESCO / WB partnership in support of CARICOM strategy in education and HIV and AIDS.

    Bundy DA; Fontani P; Ruiz Devesa D; O'Connell TE; Babb J

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2007 Dec 14. 29 p.

    This report presents the findings and outcomes of the three joint UNESCO/WB missions to Guyana, Jamaica and St. Lucia, and elaborates on next steps identified for action at both national and regional levels. The report also sets these findings and next steps within the broader context of the Caribbean plan for action and presents in its appendices, sample resources to guide the development of a comprehensive response to HIV & AIDS by the education sector.
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  5. 5
    326030

    Workshop report: Appraising HIV / AIDS Prevention Curricular Materials and Teaching-Learning Resources, Geneva, Switzerland, 9-11 June 2003.

    UNESCO. International Bureau of Education

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNESCO, International Bureau of Education, 2003 Jul 14. 11 p. (IBE/2003/RP/HV/01)

    The IBE organized this workshop as part of UNESCO's common effort to make existing curriculum documents and teaching-learning materials for HIV/AIDS education easily accessible, and to identify and disseminate good practices and lessons learned, with the aim of improving the overall success of education as principal means of combating the epidemic. Three objectives have been identified for this workshop: discuss and improve the set of appraisal criteria prepared by the IBE to assess curricular materials and teaching-learning resources for HIV/AIDS prevention in schools; apply the proposed appraisal criterial to analyze concrete curriculum materials and teaching learning resources brought by the participants and identify good practices and lessons learned; formulate follow-up actions and recommendations for future collaboration among participants for identification and promotion of promising approaches and good practice. Presentations of the participants the first day and discussions on important issues and challenges that the education sector faces in designing and implementing HIV/AIDS prevention in schools provided valuable information, but also crucial questions on how to continue the work. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    321122

    Engaging faith-based organizations in HIV prevention. A training manual for programme managers.

    Toure A; Melek M; Jato M; Kane M; Kajungu R

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2007. [53] p.

    The influence behind faith-based organizations is not difficult to discern. In many developing countries, FBOs not only provide spiritual guidance to their followers; they are often the primary providers for a variety of local health and social services. Situated within communities and building on relationships of trust, these organizations have the ability to influence the attitudes and behaviours of their fellow community members. Moreover, they are in close and regular contact with all age groups in society and their word is respected. In fact, in some traditional communities, religious leaders are often more influential than local government officials or secular community leaders. Many of the case studies researched for the UNFPA publication Culture Matters showed that the involvement of faith-based organizations in UNFPA-supported projects enhanced negotiations with governments and civil society on culturally sensitive issues. Gradually, these experiences are being shared across countries andacross regions, which has facilitated interfaith dialogue on the most effective approaches to prevent the spread of HIV. Such dialogue has also helped convince various faith-based organizations that joining together as a united front is the most effective way to fight the spread of HIV and lessen the impact of AIDS. This manual is a capacity-building tool to help policy makers and programmers identify, design and follow up on HIV prevention programmes undertaken by FBOs. The manual can also be used by development practitioners partnering with FBOs to increase their understanding of the role of FBOs in HIV prevention, and to design plans for partnering with FBOs to halt the spread of the virus. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    315100

    Guidelines for adaptation of the WHO Orientation Programme on Adolescent Health for Health Care Providers in Europe and Central Asia.

    Brann C

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], Division for Arab States, Europe and Central Asia, 2006. 25 p.

    The Orientation Programme on Adolescent Health for Health Care Providers (OP) was developed by the Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development, WHO in 2003. The aim of the OP is to orient health care providers to the special characteristics of adolescence and to appropriate approaches in addressing some adolescent-specific health needs and problems. The OP aims to strengthen the abilities of the health care providers to respond to adolescents more effectively and with greater sensitivity. The OP can significantly contribute to building national and regional capacity on adolescent health and development. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    297792

    If only. Zambia.

    Mangoye VL

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2004 Jul. 15 p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of workshops supported by UNESCO and UNFPA. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and medial professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessment of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine-tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    297791

    Arrange my marriage, arrange my death. Zambia.

    Phiri S

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2004 Jul. 13 p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of workshops supported by UNESCO and UNFPA. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and medial professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessment of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine-tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    282153

    Open your eyes or be blind forever. Namibia.

    Ashipala-Hako AN

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Division of Basic Education, Literacy and Non-Formal Education Section, 2003 Sep. [25] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social, cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    282151

    The wicked healer. Namibia.

    Shatilweh RN

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Division of Basic Education, Literacy and Non-Formal Education Section, 2003 Jul. [18] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops partially funded by the Danish Development Agency (DANIDA). The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is a health as well as a social, cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    282150

    Take care of those you love. Namibia.

    Asino E

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Division of Basic Education, Literacy and Non-Formal Education Section, 2003 Sep. [13] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social, cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    195818

    Talking about AIDS in schools: an AIDS workshop design for school principals, administrators and teachers.

    UNESCO; Rotary International

    New Delhi, India, UNESCO, 1997 May. [30] p.

    As the lead United Nations agency for education, UNESCO's aim in the field of AIDS preventive education is to encourage the development of effective educational strategies, internationally and regionally. These strategies have been adapted to various sociocultural contexts in ways which provide the means for young people to protect themselves from HIV infection. The complex nature of the problems connected with HIV/AIDS calls for a knowledge of the sociocultural, ethnic and scientific aspects of the disease, as well as mastery of communication techniques. In addition, AIDS prevention through education goes hand in hand with the ethics of human relations and with the struggle for human rights, for it is often fear and ignorance that lead to ostracism of, and discrimination against, people living with HIV/AIDS. Over the past years, UNESCO New Delhi has worked extensively for the promotion of HIV/AIDS preventive education within the formal school system in South Asia. Addressed mainly to educational decision-makers, UNESCO's approach enjoys the whole-hearted co-operation of the Ministers of Education, specialised institutes and non-governmental organisations such as professional teachers' organisations parent-teacher associations. The rapid spread of HIV/AIDS and the increasing evidence that younger people, including adolescents risk getting infected with HIV makes it imperative that they be educated on how to protect themselves. Schools have an important role to play in disseminating education to a large number of young people. This advocacy workshop design has been developed to initiated a process in New Delhi schools, by which preventive education on AIDS/STD for adolescents will have acceptance and the full support of school principals, administrators, teachers and parents of secondary school students. We would like to acknowledge the crucial support of the Chanakyapuri Rotary Club - District 3010 for introducing this approach to Rotary Interact member schools, and the Naz Foundation (India) Trust for providing the essential training resources. We believe that preventive education on HIV/AIDS can help young people acquire health-related knowledge, values, skills and practices, to be able to pursue a healthy lifestyle and also to work as agents of change for the health of their communities. School-based AIDS preventive education will continue to have our highest consideration. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    080183

    Integration of population education in APPEAL. Volume Two. Population education in universal primary education.

    UNESCO. Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific [PROAP]

    Bangkok, Thailand, UNESCO, PROAP, 1992. [3], 100 p. (Population Education Programme Service)

    As part of the goal to integrate population education into primary school curriculum and literacy programs, workshops were held in 1989 and 1991. The noteworthy teaching materials for primary education included in this document were generated from the experiences in Indonesia and Pakistan. Workshop participants completed questionnaires on various aspects of population education and then visits were made to 3 primary schools in SD Jayagiri, SD Negeri Lembang V, and SD Negeri Cibodas, Indonesia; observations were made and teachers and principals identified their needs. A similar process led to the production of materials for Pakistan after visits to a Muslim community about 4 km from Islamabad and to Saidpur, Pakistan. The materials from Indonesia focused on core messages and submessages on small family size for family welfare, delayed marriage, responsible parenthood, population planning for environmental and resource conservation and development, reorientation of beliefs, and improved status for women. Each core unit had a submessage, objective, content, method or format, target audience, and learning activity. For example, the core message on small family size for family welfare contains the message that a family needs a budget. The objective is to develop an awareness of the relationship between family needs and family income. The content is to stress the limits to expenditures within family resources and a comparison of sharing available resources in a large family. The method or format is a script for radio directed to out-of-school children and class VI. Dialogue is presented in a scene about purchasing food at a local market. The noteworthy curriculum materials from Pakistan focuses on their problems, their population, family, teachings of the Holy Prophet Muhammad, implications of population growth, living things and their environment, and Shimim's story. Each issue has a class time, subject, core message, and instructional objective. In Shimim's story, the social studies class is devoted for 45 minutes to the core message about elders as an asset to the family and society. Reading material is provided and the teacher directs questions about the material and tests students with true/false questions.
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  15. 15
    080182

    Integration of population education in APPEAL. Volume One. Guidelines for curriculum and materials development.

    UNESCO. Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific [PROAP]

    Bangkok, Thailand, UNESCO, PROAP, 1992. [3], 67 p. (Population Education Programme Service)

    As part of an effort to integrate population education messages into the Asia-Pacific Program of Education for All (APPEAL), two workshops were held, one in Indonesia in 1989 and one in Islamabad, Pakistan, in 1991. The objectives were 1) to exchange experiences on integrating population education messages for in-school and out-of-school programs; 2) to develop alternative program designs for integrating population education into primary education and literacy programs; and 3) to develop prototype materials. This article provides a summary of discussions occurring during the two workshops. Volume II and III reflect prototypes of outstanding instructional materials developed during the workshops; volume II is directed to primary education and volume III to literacy and continuing education programs. The issues discussed in this document include population core messages developed in Indonesia and Pakistan, and guidelines and instruments in curriculum and materials development. The focus of curriculum development is on special considerations in integrating population education, learning requirements, problems in use of population education materials, guidelines for determining curriculum needs and developing and using materials, and steps in developing integrated curricula and preparing and using materials. Linkages are possible with different sectors. Sample evaluation instruments are provided as well as reference materials lists (papers, brochures, reports). Some experiences with teaching-learning materials development are indicated. Basic considerations in preparing for development of population education are the national policy, concepts of population education, societal needs, program targets, core messages, and limitations. The recommendation is for the establishment of a single coordinating group to implement primary and continuing education and literacy programs for population education. Some of the problems noted were conceptualization of population education, nonavailability of experts, nonidentification of core messages, shortages of trained teachers and materials, overloading of curriculum, decision making, and employment of unsuitable or unqualified personnel in population education.
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  16. 16
    134665

    Integrating HIV-related content into a competency-based curriculum.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 1993. vi, 44 p. (HIV / AIDS Reference Library for Nurses Vol. 6)

    The current challenge represented by the AIDS epidemic demands the involvement and continued commitment of nurses. Nursing services are required in the areas of human resources management, community development, and the provision of health and social services. This booklet, prepared by the World Health Organization's Western Pacific Region, outlines curricula that will ensure nurses have the basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to promote the prevention of HIV infection and provide clinical care to AIDS patients. The first section covers the integration of HIV/AIDS content into the basic nursing curriculum and presents a competency-based approach to curriculum development. The second section presents curriculum guidelines for formal education after the basic program, while the third suggests guidelines for planning continuing education through workshops and seminars. This is the sixth in a series of booklets that comprise the HIV/AIDS Reference Library for Nurses.
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  17. 17
    110804

    Report on WHO's first course to train consultants for Management of Childhood Illness, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, November 13 to December 2, 1995.

    Pond B

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, 1995. [5] p. (Trip Report; BASICS Technical Directive: 000 HT 53 014; USAID Contract No. HRN-6006-C-00-3031-00)

    The World Health Organization's Division of Diarrheal and Acute Respiratory Disease Control (WHO-CDR) and its partners have prepared the Management of Childhood Illness course, which trains health workers in optimal outpatient management of the leading causes of child death: pneumonia, diarrhea, malnutrition, measles, and malaria. During November 13-24, 1995, WHO-CDR held a training course in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, for consultants in Management of Childhood Illness. Following the course, a subset of the consultants participated in a series of workshops on preparations for introducing the course and adapting it to correspond to national policies. WHO-CDR has officially released the materials for training in integrated outpatient management of childhood illness. They include the training materials for participants, the Course Director's Guide, the Facilitator's Guides, three videos, a paper entitled Where Referral Is Not Possible, the Adaptation Guide, and a document entitled Initial Planning by Countries for Integrated Management of Childhood Illness. Preparation needs for use of the course include adaptation of the course to correspond to national policies, organization of training sites, and training of highly qualified facilitators. Complementary training materials are needed for health workers with less formal education, for instruction in inpatient management, and for training private-for-profit health workers. Training must correspond to system-wide changes (e.g., in drug supply and in supervision). The project must extend to the home and community to improve the care for sick children. Training specialists, communications specialists, public health managers, policy makers, and parents of sick children need to be included so as to expand understanding of and support for the initiative in order to complete the unfinished tasks.
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