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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    309717

    Focusing on gender: an assessment of gender integration in UNFPA materials.

    Pozdorovkina E; El-Solh CF; Mellon C; Leidl P

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], [2006]. 70 p.

    Achieving gender equality and equity through the empowerment of women is a crucial strategic goal of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). As population and development thinking has evolved to include a sound understanding of gender, so, too, have the UNFPA mandate, policies, programmes and organizational structure. Numerous publications and training materials produced by UNFPA organizational units have aimed at facilitating an understanding of gender-related concepts. Yet, the subject of gender remains challenging for UNFPA staff. Many reviews and evaluations mention the need for more clarity and practical guidance on gender mainstreaming (see glossary) in programming. This assessment set out to help meet that need. Its objectives were as follows: To assess the quality, packaging and design of gender-related messages being communicated to UNFPA staff; To assess the utility and utilization of these materials by interviewing stakeholders in UNFPA headquarters and the field; To identify good practices to improve the communication of gender concepts and their mainstreaming into all UNFPA materials; and To promote a common understanding of what should be done at the organizational level to institutionalize strengths and achievements in current practice. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    302658

    Meeting on African Children Without Family Care, Windhoek, 30 November 2002. Final report.

    Meeting on African Children Without Family Care (2002: Windhoek)

    Windhoek, Namibia, Family Health International [FHI], 2002. 15 p.

    This workshop followed the November 25-29 Eastern and Southern Africa Workshop on Children Affected by HIV/AIDS. Approximately 50 people, representing 17 countries, attended the one-day workshop, which was convened by the UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Office in Nairobi with the support and co-operation of USAID and Family Health International. The objectives of this workshop were to: Share knowledge, information and experience relating to alternative forms of care for children without family care (orphans and other vulnerable children in each country who are living in institutional care, on the street, child headed households etc.) with a major focus on how to strengthen and greatly increase better care for such children in Africa; Identify issues of common concern relating to alternative care, and discuss possible solutions; Enable delegates to incorporate this information into country-level action; and Consider possible next steps. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    095880

    Short-term training in the demographic aspects of population ageing and its implications for socio-economic development, policies and plans. Report of the Expert Group Meeting held in Malta, 6-9 December 1993.

    United Nations. International Institute on Ageing

    Valletta, Malta, United Nations, International Institute on Ageing, 1994. 127 p.

    The International Institute on Aging (INIA), an autonomous body within the UN, was established by the UN Secretary General in 1988 in order to fulfill the training needs on aging within developing countries. INIA developed training courses on Social Gerontology, Geriatrics, Income Security, and Physical Therapy and has trained 485 persons from 76 countries. This INIA expert group meeting report presents background papers and presentations from a workshop held on December 6-9, 1993, and recommendations. Nine papers by separate authors are reported in this article. The topics include 1) demographic aspects of population aging and the implications for socioeconomic development, 2) demographic trends in aging and economic conditions in Poland, 3) consideration of aging issues among a young population in Mexico, 4) the demographic and socioeconomic implications of aging in China, 5) the demographic implications of aging among Mediterranean countries, 6) the social implications of aging in developing countries, 7) the demography of aging and economic implications, 8) selected aspects of population aging and the implications for socioeconomic development, and 9) essentials of short-term training in the demography of aging. Training courses should be directed to anyone involved in planning, formulating, and implementing national/regional policy and in research design on population aging. Courses should also apply to those who directly influence socioeconomic decision making processes related to aging issues. Applicants for training should have a statistical or demographic background, working knowledge of computers, work in or planned work in the field of aging, and proficiency in the language in which the course is taught. It is recommended that courses offer a variety of educational techniques and off-site visits and that the training group not exceed 20 persons. Participants should represent no more than two geographic regions, and the materials used in the course should be compiled and given to INIA upon course completion.
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  4. 4
    117789

    ICPD follow-up: post ICPD shifts in policy and programme direction in Thailand.

    UNFPA COUNTRY SUPPORT TEAM FOR EAST AND SOUTH-EAST ASIA NEWSLETTER. 1996 Aug; 4(2):11-2.

    This news brief identifies workshops and meetings related to the implementation of the ICPD Program of Action in Thailand and some changes in Thai policy and program direction. The 8th National Economic and Social Development Plan for 1997-2001 uses a people-centered human development approach. The Plan emphasizes extending compulsory primary education to 9 years for all children initially and eventually to 12 years. The second major change is to accelerate the extension of primary health care in rural areas and to carry out a Five-Year National AIDS Prevention and Control plan. The new Plan aims to promote family planning in target groups with high fertility, to improve the quality of family planning methods and services, to promote small family size among target groups, to improve quality of life and community self-sufficiency, to promote family planning as a means of ensuring healthy children and improved quality of life, and to promote the development of agricultural industry in rural areas. The government priority will be to develop rural areas, the skills of rural residents, and small and medium sized cities, in order to slow the flow of migration from rural to large urban areas. Local administration will be upgraded and directed to solving environmental problems. The Plan aims to expand social services and to train rural people to meet the needs of the labor market. Several workshops and seminars were conducted during 1995 and 1996 that related to reproductive health and reproductive rights. In 1994, and shortly following the ICPD, Thailand government officials, members of nongovernmental groups, UN representatives, and media staff participated in seminars on the implementation of the ICPD Plan of Action in Thailand and seminars on Thailand's population and development program.
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  5. 5
    097573
    Peer Reviewed

    Expert Committee on Maternal and Child Health and Family Planning in the 1990s and Beyond: recent trends and advances, World Health Organization, Geneva 7-13, December 1993.

    Thompson A

    MIDWIFERY. 1994 Mar; 10(1):49-50.

    This article provides a description of the World Health Organizations Expert Committee on Maternal and Child Health meeting held in 1993. The last meeting was held before the Alma Ata Declaration on Health For All 18 years ago. The recent meeting aimed to clarify the health and development conditions of women and children worldwide, policies impacting on maternal and child health and family planning (MCH/FP), trends and future program directions, shortcomings in MCH/FP, and strategies for improving MCH/FP through monitoring and evaluation. The committee participants included 10 persons who represented fields in pediatrics, public health, and obstetrics and other representatives of UN agencies. The International Confederation of Midwives and International Council of Nurses was represented. The objective of the eight-day meeting was to produce a report and recommendations. Recommendations were made to broaden the classic MCH/FP model in order to provide more comprehensive services, which are client-determined rather than provider-assigned, and to give a variety of services at health care centers. The "one stop, supermarket" approach is desired. This approach requires an appropriate design, equipment, and staffing of health care centers and a multidisciplinary and multisectoral direction. Attention must be given to adolescent needs, to health promotion and protection of the girl child, and to policy development that includes an integrated approach. The Expert Committee recommended that women's health issues be combined with family planning, HIV/AIDS prevention, pregnancy, childbirth, and perinatal health. The role of the midwife was identified as instrumental in first referral services and as an effective link to the community. The midwife is viewed as providing the role of educator and supervisor of traditional birth attendants and other primary health care workers and volunteers associated with MCH/FP services. Legislation may need to be changed to allow better use of a midwife's skills in reducing maternal mortality and to develop a flexible, appropriate, community-based approach for continuing and first-level education. The final document includes a listing of available instruments and conventions on the rights of the child and the elimination of discrimination against women.
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